Ask Difference

Host vs. Reception — What's the Difference?

Host vs. Reception — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Host and Reception

ADVERTISEMENT

Compare with Definitions

Host

One who receives or entertains guests in a social or official capacity.

Reception

The action or process of receiving something sent, given, or inflicted
Sensation is not the passive reception of stimuli

Host

A person who manages an inn or hotel.

Reception

A formal social occasion held to welcome someone or to celebrate an event
A wedding reception

Host

One that furnishes facilities and resources for a function or event
The city chosen as host for the Olympic Games.
ADVERTISEMENT

Reception

The process of receiving broadcast signals
A microchip that will allow parents to block reception of violent programmes

Host

The emcee or interviewer on a radio or television program.

Reception

The area in a hotel or organization where guests and visitors are greeted and dealt with
Wait for me downstairs in reception
The reception desk

Host

An organism on which or in which another organism lives.

Reception

The first class in an infant or primary school
My son is in reception
The reception class

Host

A cell that has been infected by a virus or other infective agent.

Reception

An act of catching a pass
His 49 receptions included six touchdowns

Host

(Medicine) The recipient of a transplanted tissue or organ.

Reception

The act or process of receiving or of being received.

Host

A computer or other device providing data or services that a remote computer can access by means of a network or modem.

Reception

(Football) The act or an instance of catching a forward pass.

Host

A computer that is connected to a TCP/IP network such as the internet.

Reception

A welcome, greeting, or acceptance
A friendly reception.

Host

An army.

Reception

A social function, especially one intended to provide a welcome or greeting
A wedding reception.

Host

A great number; a multitude.

Reception

Mental approval or acceptance
The reception of a new theory.

Host

The consecrated bread or wafer of the Eucharist.

Reception

Conversion of transmitted electromagnetic signals into perceptible forms, such as sound or light, by means of antennas and electronic equipment.

Host

To serve as host to or at
"the garden party he had hosted last spring" (Saturday Review).

Reception

The condition or quality of the signals so received.

Host

To provide software that offers data or services, hardware, or both over a computer network.

Reception

The act of receiving.

Host

One which receives or entertains a guest, socially, commercially, or officially.
A good host is always considerate of the guest’s needs.

Reception

The act or ability to receive radio or similar signals.
We have poor TV reception in the valley.
The new system provides exceptional quality of the reception signal.

Host

One that provides a facility for an event.

Reception

A social engagement, usually to formally welcome someone.
After the wedding we proceeded to the reception.

Host

A person or organization responsible for running an event.
Our company is host of the annual conference this year.

Reception

A reaction; the treatment received on first talking to a person, arriving at a place, etc.
The ambassador's jokes met a cold reception.

Host

A moderator or master of ceremonies for a performance.
The host was terrible, but the acts themselves were good.

Reception

The desk of a hotel or office where guests are received.

Host

Any computer attached to a network.

Reception

The school year, or part thereof, between preschool and Year 1, when children are introduced to formal education.

Host

(ecology) A cell or organism which harbors another organism or biological entity, usually a parasite.
Viruses depend on the host that they infect in order to be able to reproduce.

Reception

(law) The conscious adoption or transplantation of legal phenomena from a different culture.

Host

An organism bearing certain genetic material, with respect to its cells.
The so-called junk DNA is known, so far, to provide no apparent benefit to its host.

Reception

(American football) The act of catching a pass.

Host

A paid male companion offering conversation and in some cases sex, as in certain types of bar in Japan.

Reception

(linguistics) Reading viewed as the active process of receiving a text in any medium (written, spoken, signed, multimodal, nonverbal), consisting of several steps, such as ideation, comprehension, reconstruction, interpretation.

Host

A multitude of people arrayed as an army; used also in religious senses, as: Heavenly host (of angels)

Reception

The act of receiving; receipt; admission; as, the reception of food into the stomach; the reception of a letter; the reception of sensation or ideas; reception of evidence.

Host

A large number of items; a large inventory.
The dealer stocks a host of parts for my Model A.

Reception

The state of being received.

Host

(Christianity) The consecrated bread of the Eucharist.

Reception

The act or manner of receiving, especially of receiving visitors; entertainment; hence, an occasion or ceremony of receiving guests; as, a hearty reception; an elaborate reception.
What reception a poem may find.

Host

To perform the role of a host.
Our company will host the annual conference this year.
I was terrible at hosting that show.
I’ll be hosting tonight. I hope I’m not terrible.

Reception

Acceptance, as of an opinion or doctrine.
Philosophers who have quitted the popular doctrines of their countries have fallen into as extravagant opinions as even common reception countenanced.

Host

To lodge at an inn.

Reception

A retaking; a recovery.

Host

To run software made available to a remote user or process.
Kremvax hosts a variety of services.

Reception

The manner in which something is greeted;
She did not expect the cold reception she received from her superiors

Host

The consecrated wafer, believed to be the body of Christ, which in the Mass is offered as a sacrifice; also, the bread before consecration.

Reception

A formal party of people; as after a wedding

Host

An army; a number of men gathered for war.
A host so great as covered all the field.

Reception

Quality or fidelity of a received broadcast

Host

Any great number or multitude; a throng.
And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God.
All at once I saw a crowd,A host, of golden daffodils.

Reception

The act of receiving

Host

One who receives or entertains another, whether gratuitously or for compensation; one from whom another receives food, lodging, or entertainment; a landlord.
Time is like a fashionable host,That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand.

Reception

(American football) the act of catching a pass in football;
The tight end made a great reception on the 20 yard line

Host

Any animal or plant affording lodgment or subsistence to a parasitic or commensal organism. Thus a tree is a host of an air plant growing upon it.

Host

To give entertainment to.

Host

To lodge at an inn; to take up entertainment.

Host

A person who invites guests to a social event (such as a party in his or her own home) and who is responsible for them while they are there

Host

A vast multitude

Host

An animal or plant that nourishes and supports a parasite; the host does not benefit and is often harmed by the association

Host

A person who acts as host at formal occasions (makes an introductory speech and introduces other speakers)

Host

Archaic terms for army

Host

Any organization that provides resources and facilities for a function or event;
Atlanta was chosen to be host for the Olympic Games

Host

(medicine) recipient of transplanted tissue or organ from a donor

Host

The owner or manager of an inn

Host

A technical name for the bread used in the service of Mass or Holy Communion

Host

(computer science) a computer that provides client stations with access to files and printers as shared resources to a computer network

Host

Be the host of or for;
We hosted 4 couples last night

Share Your Discovery

Share via Social Media
Embed This Content
Embed Code
Share Directly via Messenger
Link
Previous Comparison
Skysurfing vs. Skydiving
Next Comparison
Oleograph vs. Canvas

Popular Comparisons

Trending Comparisons

New Comparisons

Trending Terms