VS.

Hoist vs. Tackle

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Hoistverb

(transitive) To raise; to lift; to elevate (especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, said of a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight).

Tacklenoun

A device for grasping an object and an attached means of moving it, as a rope and hook.

Hoistverb

To lift a trophy or similar prize into the air in celebration of a victory.

Tacklenoun

A block and tackle.

Hoistverb

To lift someone up to be flogged.

Tacklenoun

Equipment (rod, reel, line, lure, etc.) used when angling.

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Hoistverb

(intransitive) To be lifted up.

Tacklenoun

equipment, gear, gadgetry.

Hoistverb

To extract (code) from a loop construct as part of optimization.

Tacklenoun

A play where a player attempts to take control over the ball from an opponent, as in rugby or football.

Hoistverb

To steal, to rob.

Tacklenoun

A play where a defender brings the ball carrier to the ground.

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Hoistnoun

A hoisting device, such as pulley or crane.

Tacklenoun

(countable) Any instance in which one person intercepts another and forces them to the ground.

Hoistnoun

The act of hoisting; a lift.

‘Give me a hoist over that wall.’;

Tacklenoun

(American football) An offensive line position between a guard and an end: offensive tackle; a person playing that position.

Hoistnoun

The perpendicular height of a flag, as opposed to the fly, or horizontal length, when flying from a staff.

Tacklenoun

(American football) A defensive position between two defensive ends: defensive tackle; a person playing that position.

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Hoistnoun

The vertical edge of a flag which is next to the staff.

Tacklenoun

(slang) A man's genitalia.

Hoistnoun

The height of a fore-and-aft sail, next the mast or stay.

Tackleverb

To force a person to the ground with the weight of one's own body, usually by jumping on top or slamming one's weight into him or her.

Hoistverb

To raise; to lift; to elevate; esp., to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight.

‘They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails.’; ‘Hoisting him into his father's throne.’;

Tackleverb

To face or deal with, attempting to overcome or fight down.

‘The government's measures to tackle crime were insufficient.’;

Hoistnoun

That by which anything is hoisted; the apparatus for lifting goods.

Tackleverb

(sports) To attempt to take away a ball.

Hoistnoun

The act of hoisting; a lift.

Tackleverb

To bring a ball carrier to the ground.

Hoistnoun

The perpendicular height of a flag, as opposed to the fly, or horizontal length when flying from a staff.

Tackleverb

To "hit on" or pursue a person that one is interested in.

Hoist

Hoisted.

‘'T is the sport to have the enginerHoist with his own petar.’;

Tacklenoun

Apparatus for raising or lowering heavy weights, consisting of a rope and pulley blocks; sometimes, the rope and attachments, as distinct from the block, in which case the full appratus is referred to as a block and tackle.

Hoistnoun

lifting device for raising heavy or cumbersome objects

Tacklenoun

Any instruments of action; an apparatus by which an object is moved or operated; gear; as, fishing tackle, hunting tackle; formerly, specifically, weapons.

Hoistverb

raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help;

‘hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car’;

Tacklenoun

The rigging and apparatus of a ship; also, any purchase where more than one block is used.

Hoistverb

move from one place to another by lifting;

‘They hoisted the patient onto the operating table’;

Tacklenoun

An act of tackling{4}; as, brought down by a tackle by a lineman.

Hoistverb

raise;

‘hoist the flags’; ‘hoist a sail’;

Tacklenoun

One of two linemen on a football team, occupying a position between the guard and an end; also, the position played by such a tackle.

Tackleverb

To supply with tackle.

Tackleverb

To fasten or attach, as with a tackle; to harness; as, to tackle a horse into a coach or wagon.

Tackleverb

To seize; to lay hold of; to grapple; as, a wrestler tackles his antagonist; a dog tackles the game.

‘The greatest poetess of our day has wasted her time and strength in tackling windmills under conditions the most fitted to insure her defeat.’;

Tackleverb

To cause the ball carrier to fall to the ground, thus ending the forward motion of the ball and the play.

Tackleverb

To begin to deal with; as, to tackle the problem.

Tacklenoun

the person who plays that position on a football team;

‘the right tackle is a straight A student’;

Tacklenoun

gear consisting of ropes etc. supporting a ship's masts and sails

Tacklenoun

gear used in fishing

Tacklenoun

a position on the line of scrimmage;

‘it takes a big man to play tackle’;

Tacklenoun

(American football) grasping an opposing player with the intention of stopping by throwing to the ground

Tackleverb

accept as a challenge;

‘I'll tackle this difficult task’;

Tackleverb

put a harness;

‘harness the horse’;

Tackleverb

seize and throw down an opponent player, who usually carries the ball

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