VS.

Hitch vs. Hobble

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Hitchnoun

A sudden pull.

Hobblenoun

One of the short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.

Hitchnoun

Any of various knots used to attach a rope to an object other than another rope.

Hobblenoun

An unsteady, off-balance step.

Hitchnoun

A fastener or connection point, as for a trailer.

‘His truck sported a heavy-duty hitch for his boat.’;

Hobblenoun

A difficult situation; a scrape.

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Hitchnoun

(informal) A problem, delay or source of difficulty.

Hobblenoun

An odd job; a piece of casual work.

Hitchnoun

A hidden or unfavorable condition or element; a catch.

‘The deal sounds too good to be true. What's the hitch?’;

Hobbleverb

To fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.

Hitchnoun

A period of time spent in the military.

‘She served two hitches in Vietnam.’;

Hobbleverb

To walk lame, or unevenly.

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Hitchverb

(transitive) To pull with a jerk.

‘She hitched her jeans up and then tightened her belt.’;

Hobbleverb

(figurative) To move roughly or irregularly.

Hitchverb

(transitive) To attach, tie or fasten.

‘He hitched the bedroll to his backpack and went camping.’;

Hobbleverb

To perplex; to embarrass.

Hitchverb

(informal) To marry oneself to; especially to get hitched.

Hobbleverb

To walk lame, bearing chiefly on one leg; to walk with a hitch or hop, or with crutches.

‘The friar was hobbling the same way too.’;

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Hitchverb

contraction of hitchhike, to thumb a ride.

‘to hitch a ride’;

Hobbleverb

To move roughly or irregularly; - said of style in writing.

‘The hobbling versification, the mean diction.’;

Hitchverb

(intransitive) To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.

Hobbleverb

To fetter by tying the legs; to hopple; to clog.

Hitchverb

(intransitive) To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; said of something obstructed or impeded.

Hobbleverb

To perplex; to embarrass.

Hitchverb

(UK) To strike the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.

Hobblenoun

An unequal gait; a limp; a halt; as, he has a hobble in his gait.

Hitchverb

To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.

‘Atoms . . . which at length hitched together.’;

Hobblenoun

Same as Hopple.

Hitchverb

To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; - said of something obstructed or impeded.

‘Slides into verse, and hitches in a rhyme.’; ‘To ease themselves . . . by hitching into another place.’;

Hobblenoun

Difficulty; perplexity; embarrassment.

Hitchverb

To hit the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.

Hobblenoun

a shackle for the ankles or feet

Hitchverb

To hitchhike; - mostly used in the phrase to hitch a ride; as, he hitched his way home; he hitched a ride home.

Hobblenoun

the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg

Hitchverb

To hook; to catch or fasten as by a hook or a knot; to make fast, unite, or yoke; as, to hitch a horse, or a halter; hitch your wagon to a star.

Hobbleverb

walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury;

‘The old woman hobbles down to the store every day’;

Hitchverb

To move with hitches; as, he hitched his chair nearer.

Hobbleverb

hamper the action or progress of;

‘The chairman was hobbled by the all-powerful dean’;

Hitchnoun

A catch; anything that holds, as a hook; an impediment; an obstacle; an entanglement.

Hobbleverb

strap the foreleg and hind leg together on each side (of a horse) in order to keep the like-sided legs moving in unison;

‘hobble race horses’;

Hitchnoun

The act of catching, as on a hook, etc.

Hitchnoun

A stop or sudden halt; a stoppage; an impediment; a temporary obstruction; an obstacle; as, a hitch in one's progress or utterance; a hitch in the performance.

Hitchnoun

A sudden movement or pull; a pull up; as, the sailor gave his trousers a hitch.

Hitchnoun

A knot or noose in a rope which can be readily undone; - intended for a temporary fastening; as, a half hitch; a clove hitch; a timber hitch, etc.

Hitchnoun

A small dislocation of a bed or vein.

Hitchnoun

a period of time spent in military service

Hitchnoun

the state of inactivity following an interruption;

‘the negotiations were in arrest’; ‘held them in check’; ‘during the halt he got some lunch’; ‘the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow’; ‘he spent the entire stop in his seat’;

Hitchnoun

an unforeseen obstacle

Hitchnoun

a connection between a vehicle and the load that it pulls

Hitchnoun

a knot that can be undone by pulling against the strain that holds it

Hitchnoun

any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome

Hitchnoun

the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg

Hitchverb

to hook or entangle;

‘One foot caught in the stirrup’;

Hitchverb

walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury;

‘The old woman hobbles down to the store every day’;

Hitchverb

jump vertically, with legs stiff and back arched;

‘the yung filly bucked’;

Hitchverb

travel by getting free rides from motorists

Hitchverb

connect to a vehicle:

‘hitch the trailer to the car’;

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