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Hierarchy vs. Ladder — What's the Difference?

Hierarchy vs. Ladder — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Hierarchy and Ladder

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Hierarchy

A hierarchy (from Greek: ἱεραρχία, hierarkhia, 'rule of a high priest', from hierarkhes, 'president of sacred rites') is an arrangement of items (objects, names, values, categories, etc.) that are represented as being "above", "below", or "at the same level as" one another. Hierarchy is an important concept in a wide variety of fields, such as philosophy, architecture, design, mathematics, computer science, organizational theory, systems theory, systematic biology, and the social sciences (especially political philosophy).

Ladder

A ladder is a vertical or inclined set of rungs or steps. There are two types: rigid ladders that are self-supporting or that may be leaned against a vertical surface such as a wall, and rollable ladders, such as those made of rope or aluminium, that may be hung from the top.

Hierarchy

A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above
A career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.

Ladder

A piece of equipment consisting of a series of bars or steps between two upright lengths of wood, metal, or rope, used for climbing up or down something.

Hierarchy

Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades
Classification by hierarchy.
Discounting the effects of hierarchy.
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Ladder

A vertical strip of unravelled fabric in tights or stockings
One of Sally's stockings developed a ladder

Hierarchy

A body of persons having authority
"his relations with Hitler and the Nazi hierarchy" (John Kenneth Galbraith).

Ladder

(with reference to tights or stockings) develop or cause to develop a ladder
The first time I put them on, one of the stockings laddered
I laddered my tights as I arrived this morning

Hierarchy

A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

Ladder

An often portable structure consisting of two long sides crossed by parallel rungs, used to climb up and down.

Hierarchy

One of three main divisions of angels in traditional Christian angelology.

Ladder

Something that resembles this device, especially a run in a stocking.

Hierarchy

A body of authoritative officials organized in nested ranks.

Ladder

A means of moving higher or lower, as in a hierarchy
Used his accomplishments as a ladder to success.

Hierarchy

A social, religious, economic or political system or organization in which people or groups of people are ranked with some superior to others based on their status, authority or some other trait.

Ladder

A series of ranked stages or levels
High on the executive ladder.

Hierarchy

Any group of objects ranked so that every one but the topmost is subordinate to a specified one above it.

Ladder

A fish ladder.

Hierarchy

Dominion or authority in sacred things.

Ladder

An athletic workout in which one does progressively longer intervals followed by progressively shorter intervals.

Hierarchy

A body of officials disposed organically in ranks and orders each subordinate to the one above it; a body of ecclesiastical rulers.

Ladder

One of the intervals in such a workout.

Hierarchy

A form of government administered in the church by patriarchs, metropolitans, archbishops, bishops, and, in an inferior degree, by priests.

Ladder

To run, as a stocking does.

Hierarchy

A rank or order of holy beings.
Standards and gonfalons . . . for distinction serveOf hierarchies, of orders, and degrees.

Ladder

A frame, usually portable, of wood, metal, or rope, used for ascent and descent, consisting of two side pieces to which are fastened rungs (cross strips or rounds acting as steps).

Hierarchy

Any group of objects ranked so that every one but the topmost is subordinate to a specified one above it; also, the entire set of ordering relations between such objects. The ordering relation between each object and the one above is called a hierarchical relation.

Ladder

(figuratively) A series of stages by which one progresses to a better position.

Hierarchy

A series of ordered groupings of people or things within a system;
Put honesty first in her hierarchy of values

Ladder

(figuratively) The hierarchy or ranking system within an organization, such as the corporate ladder.

Hierarchy

The organization of people at different ranks in an administrative body

Ladder

A length of unravelled fabric in a knitted garment, especially in nylon stockings; a run.

Ladder

In the game of go, a sequence of moves following a zigzag pattern and ultimately leading to the capture of the attacked stones.

Ladder

To arrange or form into a shape of a ladder.

Ladder

To ascend (a building, a wall, etc.) using a ladder.

Ladder

Of a knitted garment: to develop a ladder as a result of a broken thread.
Oh damn it, I've laddered my tights!

Ladder

To close in on a target with successive salvos, increasing or decreasing the shot range as necessary.

Ladder

A frame usually portable, of wood, metal, or rope, for ascent and descent, consisting of two side pieces to which are fastened cross strips or rounds forming steps.
Some the engines play,And some, more bold, mount ladders to the fire.

Ladder

That which resembles a ladder in form or use;
Lowliness is young ambition's ladder.

Ladder

Steps consisting of two parallel members connected by rungs; for climbing up or down

Ladder

Ascending stages by which somebody or something can progress;
He climbed the career ladder

Ladder

A row of unravelled stitches;
She got a run in her stocking

Ladder

Come unraveled or undone as if by snagging;
Her nylons were running

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