VS.

Herald vs. Pursuivant

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Heraldnoun

A messenger, especially one bringing important news.

‘The herald blew his trumpet and shouted that the King was dead.’;

Pursuivantnoun

(archaic) A follower

Heraldnoun

A harbinger, giving signs of things to come.

‘Daffodils are heralds of Spring.’;

Pursuivantnoun

(heraldry) A functionary of lower rank than a herald, but discharging similar duties; called also pursuivant at arms; an attendant of the heralds, e.g. in the College of Arms.

Heraldnoun

(heraldry) An official whose speciality is heraldry, especially one between the ranks of pursuivant and king-of-arms.

‘Rouge Dragon is a herald at the College of Arms.’;

Pursuivantnoun

(freemasonry) A Grand Lodge Officer who guards the inner door during a meeting of the Grand Lodge

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Heraldnoun

(entomology) A moth of the species Scoliopteryx libatrix.

Pursuivantnoun

A royal messenger, (particularly) one with the authority to execute warrants.

Heraldverb

(transitive) To proclaim or announce an event.

‘Daffodils herald the Spring.’;

Pursuivantnoun

A warrant officer.

Heraldverb

To greet something with excitement; to hail.

‘The film was heralded by critics.’;

Pursuivantnoun

A functionary of lower rank than a herald, but discharging similar duties; - called also pursuivant at arms; an attendant of the heralds. Also used figuratively.

‘The herald Hope, forerunning Fear,And Fear, the pursuivant of Hope.’;

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Heraldnoun

An officer whose business was to denounce or proclaim war, to challenge to battle, to proclaim peace, and to bear messages from the commander of an army. He was invested with a sacred and inviolable character.

Pursuivantnoun

The king's messenger; a state messenger.

‘One pursuivant who attempted to execute a warrant there was murdered.’;

Heraldnoun

In the Middle Ages, the officer charged with the above duties, and also with the care of genealogies, of the rights and privileges of noble families, and especially of armorial bearings. In modern times, some vestiges of this office remain, especially in England. See Heralds' College (below), and King-at-Arms.

Pursuivantverb

To pursue.

‘Their navy was pursuivanted after with a horrible tempest.’;

Heraldnoun

A proclaimer; one who, or that which, publishes or announces; as, the herald of another's fame.

Pursuivant

A pursuivant or, more correctly, pursuivant of arms, is a junior officer of arms. Most pursuivants are attached to official heraldic authorities, such as the College of Arms in London or the Court of the Lord Lyon in Edinburgh.

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Heraldnoun

A forerunner; a a precursor; a harbinger.

‘It was the lark, the herald of the morn.’;

Heraldnoun

Any messenger.

Heraldverb

To introduce, or give tidings of, as by a herald; to proclaim; to announce; to foretell; to usher in.

Heraldnoun

(formal) a person who announces important news;

‘the chieftain had a herald who announced his arrival with a trumpet’;

Heraldnoun

an indication of the approach of something or someone

Heraldverb

foreshadow or presage

Heraldverb

praise vociferously;

‘The critics hailed the young pianist as a new Rubinstein’;

Heraldverb

greet enthusiastically or joyfully

Herald

A herald, or a herald of arms, is an officer of arms, ranking between pursuivant and king of arms. The title is commonly applied more broadly to all officers of arms.

Herald Illustrations

Pursuivant Illustrations

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