VS.

Help vs. Succour

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Helpnoun

(uncountable) Action given to provide assistance; aid.

‘I need some help with my homework.’;

Succournoun

(uncountable) Aid, assistance, or relief given to one in distress; ministration.

Helpnoun

Something or someone which provides assistance with a task.

‘He was a great help to me when I was moving house.’; ‘I've printed out a list of math helps.’;

Succournoun

Aid or assistance in the form of military equipment and soldiers, especially reinforcements sent to support military action.

Helpnoun

Documentation provided with computer software, etc. and accessed using the computer.

‘I can't find anything in the help about rotating an image.’;

Succournoun

Protection, refuge, shelter; (countable) a place providing such protection, refuge or shelter.

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Helpnoun

One or more people employed to help in the maintenance of a house or the operation of a farm or enterprise.

‘The help is coming round this morning to clean.’; ‘Most of the hired help is seasonal, for the harvest.’;

Succourverb

(transitive) To give aid, assistance, or help.

Helpnoun

(uncountable) Correction of deficits, as by psychological counseling or medication or social support or remedial training.

‘His suicide attempts were a cry for help.’; ‘He really needs help in handling customer complaints.’; ‘“He’s a real road-rager.” / “Yup, he really needs help, maybe anger management.”’;

Succourverb

To provide aid or assistance in the form of military equipment and soldiers; in particular, for helping a place under siege.

Helpverb

(transitive) To provide assistance to (someone or something).

‘He helped his grandfather cook breakfast.’;

Succourverb

To protect, to shelter; to provide a refuge.

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Helpverb

(transitive) To assist (a person) in getting something, especially food or drink at table; used with to.

‘It is polite to help your guests to food before serving yourself.’; ‘Help yourself to whatever's in the fridge.’;

Succournoun

assistance in time of difficulty;

‘the contributions provided some relief for the victims’;

Helpverb

(transitive) To contribute in some way to.

‘The white paint on the walls helps make the room look brighter.’; ‘If you want to get a job, it helps to have some prior experience.’;

Succourverb

help in a difficult situation

Helpverb

(intransitive) To provide assistance.

‘She was struggling with the groceries, so I offered to help.’; ‘Please, help!’;

Helpverb

(transitive) To avoid; to prevent; to refrain from; to restrain (oneself). Usually used in nonassertive contexts with can.

‘We couldn’t help noticing that you were late.’; ‘We couldn’t help but notice that you were late.’; ‘She’s trying not to smile, but she can’t help herself.’; ‘Can I help it if I'm so beautiful?’; ‘Can I help it that I fell in love with you?’; ‘Are they going to beat us?’; ‘Not if I can help it!’;

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Helpinterjection

A cry of distress or an urgent request for assistance

Helpverb

To furnish with strength or means for the successful performance of any action or the attainment of any object; to aid; to assist; as, to help a man in his work; to help one to remember; - the following infinitive is commonly used without to; as, "Help me scale yon balcony."

Helpverb

To furnish with the means of deliverance from trouble; as, to help one in distress; to help one out of prison.

Helpverb

To furnish with relief, as in pain or disease; to be of avail against; - sometimes with of before a word designating the pain or disease, and sometimes having such a word for the direct object.

‘The true calamus helps coughs.’;

Helpverb

To change for the better; to remedy.

‘Cease to lament for what thou canst not help.’;

Helpverb

To prevent; to hinder; as, the evil approaches, and who can help it?

Helpverb

To forbear; to avoid.

‘I can not help remarking the resemblance betwixt him and our author.’;

Helpverb

To wait upon, as the guests at table, by carving and passing food.

‘The god of learning and of lightWould want a god himself to help him out.’;

Helpverb

To lend aid or assistance; to contribute strength or means; to avail or be of use; to assist.

‘A generous present helps to persuade, as well as an agreeable person.’;

Helpnoun

Strength or means furnished toward promoting an object, or deliverance from difficulty or distress; aid; ^; also, the person or thing furnishing the aid; as, he gave me a help of fifty dollars.

‘Give us help from trouble, for vain is the help of man.’; ‘God is . . . a very present help in trouble.’; ‘Virtue is a friend and a help to nature.’;

Helpnoun

Remedy; relief; as, there is no help for it.

Helpnoun

A helper; one hired to help another; also, thew hole force of hired helpers in any business.

Helpnoun

Specifically, a domestic servant, man or woman.

Helpnoun

the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose;

‘he gave me an assist with the housework’; ‘could not walk without assistance’; ‘rescue party went to their aid’; ‘offered his help in unloading’;

Helpnoun

a resource;

‘visual aids in teaching’; ‘economic assistance to depressed areas’;

Helpnoun

a means of serving;

‘of no avail’; ‘there's no help for it’;

Helpnoun

a person who contributes to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose;

‘my invaluable assistant’; ‘they hired additional help to finish the work’;

Helpverb

give help or assistance; be of service;

‘Everyone helped out during the earthquake’; ‘Can you help me carry this table?’; ‘She never helps around the house’;

Helpverb

be of use;

‘This will help to prevent accidents’;

Helpverb

improve the condition of;

‘These pills will help the patient’;

Helpverb

abstain from doing; always used with a negative;

‘I can't help myself--I have to smoke’; ‘She could not help watching the sad spectacle’;

Helpverb

contribute to the furtherance of;

‘This money will help the development of literacy in developing countries’;

Helpverb

improve; change for the better;

‘New slipcovers will help the old living room furniture’;

Helpverb

help to some food; help with food or drink;

‘I served him three times, and after that he helped himself’;

Helpverb

take or use;

‘She helped herself to some of the office supplies’;

Helpverb

make it easier or possible for (someone) to do something by offering them one's services or resources

‘the teenager helped out in the corner shop’; ‘she helped him find a buyer’; ‘they helped her with domestic chores’;

Helpverb

improve (a situation or problem); be of benefit to

‘legislation to fit all new cars with catalytic converters will help’; ‘upbeat comments about prospects helped confidence’;

Helpverb

assist (someone) to move

‘I helped her up’;

Helpverb

assist someone to put on or take off (a garment)

‘she would help him off with his coat’;

Helpverb

serve someone with (food or drink)

‘may I help you to some more meat?’; ‘she helped herself to a biscuit’;

Helpverb

take something without permission

‘he helped himself to the wages she had brought home’;

Helpverb

cannot or could not avoid

‘he couldn't help laughing’; ‘I'm sorry to put you to any inconvenience, but it can't be helped’;

Helpverb

cannot or could not stop oneself from doing something

‘she couldn't help herself; she burst into tears’;

Helpnoun

the action of helping someone to do something

‘I asked for help from my neighbours’;

Helpnoun

the fact of being useful

‘the skimpy manual isn't much help for beginners’;

Helpnoun

a person or thing that helps

‘he was a great help’; ‘she's been given financial help with travel’;

Helpnoun

a domestic employee

‘she has taught herself to cook since the defection of the last of the village helps’; ‘the help cleaned up the leftover food and half-drunk cocktails’;

Helpnoun

giving assistance to a computer user in the form of displayed instructions

‘a help menu’;

Helpinterjection

used as an appeal for urgent assistance

‘Help! I'm drowning!’;

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