VS.

Hedge vs. Edge

Published:
Views: 175

Hedgenoun

A thicket of bushes or other shrubbery, especially one planted as a fence between two portions of land, or to separate the parts of a garden.

‘He trims the hedge once a week.’;

Edgenoun

The boundary line of a surface.

Hedgenoun

A barrier (often consisting of a line of persons or objects) to protect someone or something from harm.

Edgenoun

(geometry) A one-dimensional face of a polytope. In particular, the joining line between two vertices of a polygon; the place where two faces of a polyhedron meet.

Hedgenoun

A mound of earth, stone- or turf-faced, often topped with bushes, used as a fence between any two portions of land.

Edgenoun

An advantage.

‘I have the edge on him.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Hedgenoun

(pragmatics) A non-committal or intentionally ambiguous statement.

‘weasel word’;

Edgenoun

The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe; that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc.

Hedgenoun

(finance) Contract or arrangement reducing one's exposure to risk (for example the risk of price movements or interest rate movements).

‘The asset class acts as a hedge.’; ‘A hedge is an investment position intended to offset potential losses/gains that may be incurred by a companion investment. In simple language, a hedge is used to reduce any substantial losses/gains suffered by an individual or an organization.’;

Edgenoun

A sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; an extreme verge.

‘The cup is right on the edge of the table.’; ‘He is standing on the edge of a precipice.’;

Hedgenoun

Used attributively, with figurative indication of a person's upbringing, or professional activities, taking place by the side of the road; third-rate.

Edgenoun

Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hedgeverb

(transitive) To enclose with a hedge or hedges.

‘to hedge a field or garden’;

Edgenoun

The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part (of a period of time)

‘in the edge of evening’;

Hedgeverb

(transitive) To obstruct or surround.

Edgenoun

(cricket) A shot where the ball comes off the edge of the bat, often unintentionally.

Hedgeverb

To offset the risk associated with.

Edgenoun

(graph theory) A connected pair of vertices in a graph.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hedgeverb

(ambitransitive) To avoid verbal commitment.

‘He carefully hedged his statements with weasel words.’;

Edgenoun

In male masturbation, a level of sexual arousal that is maintained just short of reaching the point of inevitability, or climax; see also edging.

Hedgeverb

(intransitive) To construct or repair a hedge.

Edgeverb

(transitive) To move an object slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

‘He edged the book across the table.’;

Hedgeverb

To reduce one's exposure to risk.

Edgeverb

(intransitive) To move slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

‘He edged away from her.’;

Hedgenoun

A thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden.

‘The roughest berry on the rudest hedge.’; ‘Through the verdant mazeOf sweetbrier hedges I pursue my walk.’;

Edgeverb

(usually in the form 'just edge') To win by a small margin.

Hedgeverb

To inclose or separate with a hedge; to fence with a thickly set line or thicket of shrubs or small trees; as, to hedge a field or garden.

Edgeverb

To hit the ball with an edge of the bat, causing a fine deflection.

Hedgeverb

To obstruct, as a road, with a barrier; to hinder from progress or success; - sometimes with up and out.

‘I will hedge up thy way with thorns.’; ‘Lollius Urbius . . . drew another wall . . . to hedge out incursions from the north.’;

Edgeverb

(transitive) To trim the margin of a lawn where the grass meets the sidewalk, usually with an electric or gas-powered lawn edger.

Hedgeverb

To surround for defense; to guard; to protect; to hem (in).

Edgeverb

(transitive) To furnish with an edge; to construct an edging.

Hedgeverb

To surround so as to prevent escape.

‘That is a law to hedge in the cuckoo.’;

Edgeverb

To furnish with an edge, as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.

Hedgeverb

To protect oneself against excessive loss in an activity by taking a countervailing action; as, to hedge an investment denominated in a foreign currency by buying or selling futures in that currency; to hedge a donation to one political party by also donating to the opposed political party.

Edgeverb

(figurative) To make sharp or keen; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.

Hedgeverb

To shelter one's self from danger, risk, duty, responsibility, etc., as if by hiding in or behind a hedge; to skulk; to slink; to shirk obligations.

‘I myself sometimes, leaving the fear of God on the left hand and hiding mine honor in my necessity, am fain to shuffle, to hedge and to lurch.’;

Edgeverb

To delay one's orgasm so as to remain almost at the point of orgasm.

Hedgeverb

To reduce the risk of a wager by making a bet against the side or chance one has bet on.

Edgenoun

The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument; as, the edge of an ax, knife, sword, or scythe.

‘He which hath the sharp sword with two edges.’; ‘Slander,Whose edge is sharper than the sword.’;

Hedgeverb

To use reservations and qualifications in one's speech so as to avoid committing one's self to anything definite.

‘The Heroic Stanzas read much more like an elaborate attempt to hedge between the parties than . . . to gain favor from the Roundheads.’;

Edgenoun

Any sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; extreme verge; as, the edge of a table, a precipice.

‘Upon the edge of yonder coppice.’; ‘In worst extremes, and on the perilous edgeOf battle.’; ‘Pursue even to the very edge of destruction.’;

Hedgenoun

a fence formed by a row of closely planted shrubs or bushes

Edgenoun

Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.

‘The full edge of our indignation.’; ‘Death and persecution lose all the ill that they can have, if we do not set an edge upon them by our fears and by our vices.’;

Hedgenoun

any technique designed to reduce or eliminate financial risk; for example, taking two positions that will offset each other if prices change

Edgenoun

The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part; as, in the edge of evening.

Hedgenoun

an intentionally noncommittal or ambiguous statement;

‘when you say `maybe' you are just hedging’;

Edgeverb

To furnish with an edge as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.

‘To edge her champion's sword.’;

Hedgeverb

avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues);

‘He dodged the issue’; ‘she skirted the problem’; ‘They tend to evade their responsibilities’; ‘he evaded the questions skillfully’;

Edgeverb

To shape or dress the edge of, as with a tool.

Hedgeverb

hinder or restrict with or as if with a hedge;

‘The animals were hedged in’;

Edgeverb

To furnish with a fringe or border; as, to edge a dress; to edge a garden with box.

‘Hills whose tops were edged with groves.’;

Hedgeverb

enclose or bound in with or as it with a hedge or hedges;

‘hedge the property’;

Edgeverb

To make sharp or keen, figuratively; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.

‘By such reasonings, the simple were blinded, and the malicious edged.’;

Hedgeverb

minimize loss or risk;

‘diversify your financial portfolio to hedge price risks’; ‘hedge your bets’;

Edgeverb

To move by little and little or cautiously, as by pressing forward edgewise; as, edging their chairs forwards.

Hedge

A hedge or hedgerow is a line of closely spaced shrubs and sometimes trees, planted and trained to form a barrier or to mark the boundary of an area, such as between neighbouring properties. Hedges used to separate a road from adjoining fields or one field from another, and of sufficient age to incorporate larger trees, are known as hedgerows.

Edgeverb

To move sideways; to move gradually; as, edge along this way.

Edgeverb

To sail close to the wind.

‘I must edge up on a point of wind.’;

Edgenoun

the boundary of a surface

Edgenoun

a sharp side formed by the intersection of two surfaces of an object;

‘he rounded the edges of the box’;

Edgenoun

a line determining the limits of an area

Edgenoun

the attribute of urgency;

‘his voice had an edge to it’;

Edgenoun

a slight competitive advantage;

‘he had an edge on the competition’;

Edgenoun

a strip near the boundary of an object;

‘he jotted a note on the margin of the page’;

Edgeverb

advance slowly, as if by inches;

‘He edged towards the car’;

Edgeverb

provide with a border or edge;

‘edge the tablecloth with embroidery’;

Edgeverb

lie adjacent to another or share a boundary;

‘Canada adjoins the U.S.’; ‘England marches with Scotland’;

Edgeverb

provide with an edge;

‘edge a blade’;

Edgenoun

the outside limit of an object, area, or surface

‘she perched on the edge of a desk’; ‘a willow tree at the water's edge’;

Edgenoun

an area next to a steep drop

‘the cliff edge’;

Edgenoun

the point immediately before something unpleasant or momentous occurs

‘the economy was teetering on the edge of recession’;

Edgenoun

the sharpened side of the blade of a cutting implement or weapon

‘a knife with a razor-sharp edge’;

Edgenoun

the line along which two surfaces of a solid meet.

Edgenoun

an intense, sharp, or striking quality

‘a flamenco singer brings a primitive edge to the music’; ‘there was an edge of menace in his voice’;

Edgenoun

a quality or factor which gives superiority over close rivals

‘his cars have the edge over his rivals'’;

Edgeverb

provide with a border or edge

‘the pool is edged with paving’;

Edgeverb

move or cause to move gradually or furtively in a particular direction

‘Hazel quietly edged him away from the others’; ‘she tried to edge away from him’;

Edgeverb

give an intense or sharp quality to

‘the bitterness that edged her voice’;

Edgeverb

strike (the ball) with the edge of the bat; strike a ball delivered by (the bowler) with the edge of the bat

‘Haynes edged to slip’; ‘he edged a ball into his pad’;

Edgeverb

ski with one's weight on the edges of one's skis

‘you will be edging early, controlling a parallel turn’;

Hedge Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons