VS.

Heave vs. Throw

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  • Heave (verb)

    To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing).

    "We heaved the chest-of-drawers on to the second-floor landing."

  • Heave (verb)

    To throw, cast.

    "They heaved rocks into the pond."

    "The cap'n hove the body overboard."

  • Heave (verb)

    To rise and fall.

    "Her chest heaved with emotion."

  • Heave (verb)

    To utter with effort.

    "She heaved a sigh and stared out of the window."

  • Heave (verb)

    To pull up with a rope or cable.

    "Heave up the anchor there, boys!"

  • Heave (verb)

    To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards.

  • Heave (verb)

    To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.

  • Heave (verb)

    To displace (a vein, stratum).

  • Heave (verb)

    To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions.

    "The wind heaved the waves."

  • Heave (verb)

    To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation.

    "to heave the ship ahead"

  • Heave (verb)

    To retch, to make an effort to vomit; to vomit.

    "The smell of the old cheese was enough to make you heave."

  • Heave (verb)

    To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.

  • Heave (verb)

    To rob; to steal from; to plunder.

  • Heave (noun)

    An effort to raise something, such as a weight or one's own body, or to move something heavy.

  • Heave (noun)

    An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, etc.

  • Heave (noun)

    A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.

  • Heave (noun)

    The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare pitch.

  • Heave (noun)

    An effort to vomit; retching.

  • Heave (noun)

    Broken wind in horses.

  • Heave (noun)

    A forceful shot in which the ball follows a high trajectory

  • Throw (verb)

    To hurl; to cause an object to move rapidly through the air.

    "throw a shoe; throw a javelin; the horse threw its rider"

  • Throw (verb)

    To eject or cause to fall off.

    "eject|throw off"

  • Throw (verb)

    To move to another position or condition; to displace.

    "throw the switch"

    "displace|relocate"

  • Throw (verb)

    To make (a pot) by shaping clay as it turns on a wheel.

  • Throw (verb)

    to deliver (the ball) illegally by straightening the bowling arm during delivery.

  • Throw (verb)

    To send (an error) to an exception-handling mechanism in order to interrupt normal processing.

    "If the file is read-only, the method throws an invalid-operation exception."

  • Throw (verb)

    To intentionally lose a game.

    "The tennis player was accused of taking bribes to throw the match."

    "take a dive"

  • Throw (verb)

    To confuse or mislead.

    "The deliberate red herring threw me at first."

  • Throw (verb)

    To send desperately.

    "Their sergeant threw the troops into pitched battle."

  • Throw (verb)

    To imprison.

    "The magistrate ordered the suspect to be thrown into jail."

  • Throw (verb)

    To organize an event, especially a party.

  • Throw (verb)

    To roll (a die or dice).

  • Throw (verb)

    To cause a certain number on the die or dice to be shown after rolling it.

  • Throw (verb)

    To discard.

  • Throw (verb)

    To lift the opponent off the ground and bring him back down, especially into a position behind the thrower.

  • Throw (verb)

    To change in order to give the illusion that the voice is that of someone else.

  • Throw (verb)

    To show sudden emotion, especially anger.

  • Throw (verb)

    To project or send forth.

  • Throw (verb)

    To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.

  • Throw (verb)

    To twist two or more filaments of (silk, etc.) so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.

  • Throw (verb)

    To select (a pitcher); to assign a pitcher to a given role (such as starter or reliever).

  • Throw (verb)

    To install (a bridge).

  • Throw (verb)

    To twist or turn.

    "a thrown nail"

  • Throw (verb)

    To give birth to.

  • Throw (noun)

    The flight of a thrown object.

    "What a great throw by the quarterback!"

  • Throw (noun)

    The act of throwing something.

    "With an accurate throw, he lassoed the cow."

    "The gambler staked everything on one throw of the dice."

  • Throw (noun)

    One's ability to throw.

    "He's got a girl's throw."

    "He's always had a pretty decent throw."

  • Throw (noun)

    A distance travelled; displacement.

    "the throw of the piston"

  • Throw (noun)

    A piece of fabric used to cover a bed, sofa or other soft furnishing.

  • Throw (noun)

    A single instance, occurrence, venture, or chance.

    "Football tickets are expensive at fifty bucks a throw."

  • Throw (noun)

    Pain, especially pain associated with childbirth; throe.

  • Throw (noun)

    The act of giving birth in animals, especially in cows.

  • Throw (noun)

    A moment, time, occasion.

  • Throw (noun)

    A period of time; a while.

Wiktionary
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  • Heave

    To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; - often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land.

  • Heave

    To throw; to cast; - obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.

  • Heave

    To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; - mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.

  • Heave

    To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.

  • Heave

    To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom.

  • Heave (verb)

    To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.

  • Heave (verb)

    To rise and fall with alternate motions, as the lungs in heavy breathing, as waves in a heavy sea, as ships on the billows, as the earth when broken up by frost, etc.; to swell; to dilate; to expand; to distend; hence, to labor; to struggle.

  • Heave (verb)

    To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.

  • Heave (verb)

    To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit.

  • Heave (noun)

    An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.

  • Heave (noun)

    An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like.

  • Heave (noun)

    A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.

  • Throw (noun)

    Pain; especially, pain of travail; throe.

  • Throw (noun)

    Time; while; space of time; moment; trice.

  • Throw (noun)

    The act of hurling or flinging; a driving or propelling from the hand or an engine; a cast.

  • Throw (noun)

    A stroke; a blow.

  • Throw (noun)

    The distance which a missile is, or may be, thrown; as, a stone's throw.

  • Throw (noun)

    A cast of dice; the manner in which dice fall when cast; as, a good throw.

  • Throw (noun)

    An effort; a violent sally.

  • Throw (noun)

    The extreme movement given to a sliding or vibrating reciprocating piece by a cam, crank, eccentric, or the like; travel; stroke; as, the throw of a slide valve. Also, frequently, the length of the radius of a crank, or the eccentricity of an eccentric; as, the throw of the crank of a steam engine is equal to half the stroke of the piston.

  • Throw (noun)

    A potter's wheel or table; a jigger. See 2d Jigger, 2 (a).

  • Throw (noun)

    A turner's lathe; a throwe.

  • Throw (noun)

    The amount of vertical displacement produced by a fault; - according to the direction it is designated as an upthrow, or a downthrow.

  • Throw

    To fling, cast, or hurl with a certain whirling motion of the arm, to throw a ball; - distinguished from to toss, or to bowl.

  • Throw

    To fling or cast in any manner; to drive to a distance from the hand or from an engine; to propel; to send; as, to throw stones or dust with the hand; a cannon throws a ball; a fire engine throws a stream of water to extinguish flames.

  • Throw

    To drive by violence; as, a vessel or sailors may be thrown upon a rock.

  • Throw

    To cause to take a strategic position; as, he threw a detachment of his army across the river.

  • Throw

    To overturn; to prostrate in wrestling; as, a man throws his antagonist.

  • Throw

    To cast, as dice; to venture at dice.

  • Throw

    To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.

  • Throw

    To divest or strip one's self of; to put off.

  • Throw

    To form or shape roughly on a throwing engine, or potter's wheel, as earthen vessels.

  • Throw

    To give forcible utterance to; to cast; to vent.

  • Throw

    To bring forth; to produce, as young; to bear; - said especially of rabbits.

  • Throw

    To twist two or more filaments of, as silk, so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; - sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.

  • Throw (verb)

    To perform the act of throwing or casting; to cast; specifically, to cast dice.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Heave (noun)

    an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling);

    "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"

  • Heave (noun)

    (geology) a horizontal dislocation

  • Heave (noun)

    the act of lifting something with great effort

  • Heave (noun)

    an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting;

    "a bad case of the heaves"

  • Heave (noun)

    the act of raising something;

    "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"

    "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up"

  • Heave (noun)

    throwing something heavy (with great effort);

    "he gave it a mighty heave"

    "he was not good at heaving passes"

  • Heave (verb)

    utter a sound, as with obvious effort;

    "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do"

  • Heave (verb)

    throw with great effort

  • Heave (verb)

    rise and move, as in waves or billows;

    "The army surged forward"

  • Heave (verb)

    lift or elevate

  • Heave (verb)

    nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position;

    "The vessel hove into sight"

  • Heave (verb)

    breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted;

    "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily"

  • Heave (verb)

    bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat;

    "The highway buckled during the heatwave"

  • Heave (verb)

    make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit

  • Throw (noun)

    the act of throwing (propelling something through the air with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist);

    "the catcher made a good throw to second base"

  • Throw (noun)

    a single chance or instance;

    "he couldn't afford $50 a throw"

  • Throw (noun)

    the maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam

  • Throw (noun)

    the distance that something can be thrown;

    "it is just a stone's throw from here"

  • Throw (noun)

    bedclothes consisting of a lightweight cloth covering (an afghan or bedspread) that is casually thrown over something

  • Throw (noun)

    the throwing of an object in order to determine an outcome randomly;

    "he risked his fortune on a throw of the dice"

  • Throw (verb)

    project through the air;

    "throw a frisbee"

  • Throw (verb)

    move violently, energetically, or carelessly;

    "She threw herself forwards"

  • Throw (verb)

    get rid of;

    "he shed his image as a pushy boss"

    "shed your clothes"

  • Throw (verb)

    place or put with great energy;

    "She threw the blanket around the child"

    "thrust the money in the hands of the beggar"

  • Throw (verb)

    convey or communicate; of a smile, a look, a physical gesture;

    "Throw a glance"

    "She gave me a dirty look"

  • Throw (verb)

    cause to go on or to be engaged or set in operation;

    "switch on the light"

    "throw the lever"

  • Throw (verb)

    put or send forth;

    "She threw the flashlight beam into the corner"

    "The setting sun threw long shadows"

    "cast a spell"

    "cast a warm light"

  • Throw (verb)

    to put into a state or activity hastily, suddenly, or carelessly;

    "Jane threw dinner together"

    "throw the car into reverse"

  • Throw (verb)

    cause to be confused emotionally

  • Throw (verb)

    utter with force; utter vehemently;

    "hurl insults"

    "throw accusations at someone"

  • Throw (verb)

    organize or be responsible for;

    "hold a reception"

    "have, throw, or make a party"

    "give a course"

  • Throw (verb)

    make on a potter's wheel;

    "she threw a beautiful teapot"

  • Throw (verb)

    cause to fall off;

    "The horse threw its unexperienced rider"

  • Throw (verb)

    throw (a die) out onto a flat surface;

    "Throw a six"

  • Throw (verb)

    be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly;

    "These questions confuse even the experts"

    "This question completely threw me"

    "This question befuddled even the teacher"

Princeton's WordNet
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