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Heave vs. Lift — What's the Difference?

Heave vs. Lift — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Heave and Lift

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Heave

To raise or lift, especially with great effort or force
Heaved the box of books onto the table.

Lift

To direct or carry from a lower to a higher position; raise
Lift one's eyes.
Lifted the suitcase.

Heave

To throw (a heavy object) with great effort; hurl
Heave the shot.
Heaved a brick through the window.

Lift

To transport by air
The helicopter lifted the entire team to the meet.

Heave

To throw or toss
Heaved his backpack into the corner.
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Lift

To revoke by taking back; rescind
Lifted the embargo.

Heave

To give out or utter with effort or pain
Heaved a sigh.
Heaved a groan.

Lift

To bring an end to (a blockade or siege) by removing forces.

Heave

To vomit (something).

Lift

To cease (artillery fire) in an area.

Heave

To raise or haul up by means of a rope, line, or cable
Hove the anchor up and set sail.

Lift

To raise in condition, rank, or esteem
Work that lifted her in the eyes of her colleagues.

Heave

To move (a ship) in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling
Hove the ship astern.

Lift

To uplift; elate
Your telephone call really lifted my spirits.

Heave

To make rise or swell
The wind heaving huge waves.
An exhausted dog heaving its chest.

Lift

To remove (plants) from the ground for transplanting.

Heave

(Geology) To displace or move (a vein, lode, or stratum, for example).

Lift

To project or sound in loud, clear tones
Lifted their voices in song.

Heave

To rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge
The sidewalk froze and heaved.

Lift

(Informal) To steal; pilfer
A thief lifted my wallet.

Heave

To rise and fall in turn, as waves.

Lift

(Informal) To copy from something already published; plagiarize
Lifted whole paragraphs from the encyclopedia.

Heave

To gag or vomit.

Lift

To pay off or clear (a debt or mortgage, for example).

Heave

To pant; gasp
Heave for air.

Lift

To perform cosmetic surgery on (the face, for example), especially in order to remove wrinkles or sagging skin.

Heave

To move in a certain direction or to a specified position
The frigate hove alongside.

Lift

(Sports) To hit (a golf ball) very high into the air.

Heave

To pull at or haul a rope or cable
The brig is heaving around on the anchor.

Lift

To pick up (a golf ball) to place it in a better lie.

Heave

To push at a capstan bar or lever.

Lift

To shoot or flip (a puck) so that it rises sharply off the ice.

Heave

The act or effort of raising or lifting something
With a great heave hauled the fish onto the deck.

Lift

To rise; ascend.

Heave

An act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance
A heave of 63 feet.

Lift

To yield to upward pressure
These windows lift easily.

Heave

A horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault.

Lift

To disappear or disperse by or as if by rising
By afternoon the smog had lifted.

Heave

An upward movement of a surface, especially when caused by swelling and expansion of clay, removal of overburden, or freezing of subsurface water.

Lift

To stop temporarily
The rain lifted by morning.

Heave

An upward movement, especially of a ship or aircraft.

Lift

To become elevated; soar
Their spirits lifted when help came.

Heave

The act or an instance of gagging or vomiting.

Lift

The act or process of rising or raising to a higher position.

Heave

Heaves (used with a sing. or pl. verb) See recurrent airway obstruction.

Lift

Power or force available for raising
The lift of a pump.

Heave

(transitive) To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing).
We heaved the chest-of-drawers on to the second-floor landing.

Lift

An organized effort or a flight transporting supplies or people by airplane; an airlift.

Heave

(transitive) To throw, cast.
They heaved rocks into the pond.
The cap'n hove the body overboard.

Lift

The extent or height to which something is raised or rises; the amount of elevation.

Heave

(intransitive) To rise and fall.
Her chest heaved with emotion.

Lift

The distance or space through which something is raised or rises.

Heave

(transitive) To utter with effort.
She heaved a sigh and stared out of the window.

Lift

A rise or an elevation in the level of the ground.

Heave

To pull up with a rope or cable.
Heave up the anchor there, boys!

Lift

An elevation of the spirits
The good news gave us a lift.

Heave

To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards.

Lift

A raised, high, or erect position, as of a part of the body
The lift of his chin.

Heave

(intransitive) To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.

Lift

A machine or device designed to pick up, raise, or carry something.

Heave

To displace (a vein, stratum).

Lift

One of the layers of leather, rubber, or other material making up the heel of a shoe.

Heave

To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions.
The wind heaved the waves.

Lift

Chiefly British A passenger or cargo elevator.

Heave

To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation.
To heave the ship ahead

Lift

A ride in a vehicle given to help someone reach a destination
Gave my friend a lift into town.

Heave

(intransitive) To retch, to make an effort to vomit; to vomit.
The smell of the old cheese was enough to make you heave.

Lift

Assistance or help
Gave her a lift with her heavy packages.

Heave

(intransitive) To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.

Lift

A set of pumps used in a mine.

Heave

To rob; to steal from; to plunder.

Lift

The component of the total aerodynamic force acting on an airfoil or on an entire aircraft or winged missile perpendicular to the relative wind and normally exerted in an upward direction, opposing the pull of gravity.

Heave

An effort to raise something, such as a weight or one's own body, or to move something heavy.

Lift

(ambitransitive) To raise or rise.
The fog eventually lifted, leaving the streets clear.
You never lift a finger to help me!

Heave

An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, etc.

Lift

To steal.

Heave

A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.

Lift

To source directly without acknowledgement; to plagiarise.

Heave

(nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare pitch.

Lift

To arrest (a person).

Heave

An effort to vomit; retching.

Lift

(transitive) To remove (a ban, restriction, etc.).

Heave

Broken wind in horses.

Lift

(transitive) To alleviate, to lighten (pressure, tension, stress, etc.)

Heave

(cricket) A forceful shot in which the ball follows a high trajectory

Lift

(transitive) to cause to move upwards.

Heave

To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; - often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land.
One heaved ahigh, to be hurled down below.
Here a little child I stand,Heaving up my either hand.

Lift

To lift weights; to weight-lift.
She lifts twice a week at the gym.

Heave

To throw; to cast; - obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.

Lift

To try to raise something; to exert the strength for raising or bearing.

Heave

To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; - mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.

Lift

To elevate or improve in rank, condition, etc.; often with up.

Heave

To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.
The wretched animal heaved forth such groans.

Lift

(obsolete) To bear; to support.

Heave

To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom.
The glittering, finny swarmsThat heave our friths, and crowd upon our shores.

Lift

To collect, as moneys due; to raise.

Heave

To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.
And the huge columns heave into the sky.
Where heaves the turf in many a moldering heap.
The heaving sods of Bunker Hill.

Lift

(programming) To transform (a function) into a corresponding function in a different context.

Heave

To rise and fall with alternate motions, as the lungs in heavy breathing, as waves in a heavy sea, as ships on the billows, as the earth when broken up by frost, etc.; to swell; to dilate; to expand; to distend; hence, to labor; to struggle.
Frequent for breath his panting bosom heaves.
The heaving plain of ocean.

Lift

(finance) To buy a security or other asset previously offered for sale.

Heave

To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.
The Church of England had struggled and heaved at a reformation ever since Wyclif's days.

Lift

To take (hounds) off the existing scent and move them to another spot.

Heave

To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit.

Lift

An act of lifting or raising.

Heave

An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.
After many strains and heavesHe got up to his saddle eaves.

Lift

The act of transporting someone in a vehicle; a ride; a trip.
He gave me a lift to the bus station.

Heave

An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like.
There's matter in these sighs, these profound heaves,You must translate.
None could guess whether the next heave of the earthquake would settle . . . or swallow them.

Lift

Mechanical device for vertically transporting goods or people between floors in a building.
Take the lift to the fourth floor.

Heave

A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.

Lift

An upward force, such as the force that keeps aircraft aloft.

Heave

An upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling);
The heaving of waves on a rough sea

Lift

(measurement) The difference in elevation between the upper pool and lower pool of a waterway, separated by lock.

Heave

(geology) a horizontal dislocation

Lift

A thief.

Heave

The act of lifting something with great effort

Lift

(dance) The lifting of a dance partner into the air.

Heave

An involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting;
A bad case of the heaves

Lift

Permanent construction with a built-in platform that is lifted vertically.

Heave

The act of raising something;
He responded with a lift of his eyebrow
Fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up

Lift

(figurative) An improvement in mood.

Heave

Throwing something heavy (with great effort);
He gave it a mighty heave
He was not good at heaving passes

Lift

The amount or weight to be lifted.
What's the maximum lift of this crane?

Heave

Utter a sound, as with obvious effort;
She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do

Lift

The space or distance through which anything is lifted.

Heave

Throw with great effort

Lift

A rise; a degree of elevation.
The lift of a lock in canals

Heave

Rise and move, as in waves or billows;
The army surged forward

Lift

A liftgate.

Heave

Lift or elevate

Lift

(nautical) A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below, and used for raising or supporting the end of the yard.

Heave

Nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position;
The vessel hove into sight

Lift

(engineering) One of the steps of a cone pulley.

Heave

Breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted;
The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily

Lift

(shoemaking) A layer of leather in the heel of a shoe.

Heave

Bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat;
The highway buckled during the heatwave

Lift

(horology) That portion of the vibration of a balance during which the impulse is given.

Heave

Make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit

Lift

Air.

Lift

The sky; the heavens; firmament; atmosphere.

Lift

The sky; the atmosphere; the firmament.

Lift

Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted.

Lift

The space or distance through which anything is lifted; as, a long lift.

Lift

Help; assistance, as by lifting.
The goat gives the fox a lift.

Lift

That by means of which a person or thing lifts or is lifted

Lift

A rise; a degree of elevation; as, the lift of a lock in canals.

Lift

A lift gate. See Lift gate, below.

Lift

A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below; - used for raising or supporting the end of the yard.

Lift

One of the steps of a cone pulley.

Lift

A layer of leather in the heel.

Lift

That portion of the vibration of a balance during which the impulse is given.

Lift

A brightening of the spirits; encouragement; as, the campaign workers got a lift from the President's endorsement.

Lift

To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support or holding in the higher place; - said of material things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair or a burden.

Lift

To raise, elevate, exalt, improve, in rank, condition, estimation, character, etc.; - often with up.
The Roman virtues lift up mortal man.
Lest, being lifted up with pride.

Lift

To bear; to support.

Lift

To collect, as moneys due; to raise.

Lift

To steal; to carry off by theft (esp. cattle); as, to lift a drove of cattle.
He ne'er lift up his hand but conquered.

Lift

To try to raise something; to exert the strength for raising or bearing.
Strained by lifting at a weight too heavy.

Lift

To rise; to become or appear raised or elevated; as, the fog lifts; the land lifts to a ship approaching it.

Lift

To steal; also, to live by theft.

Lift

The act of giving temporary assistance

Lift

The component of the aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil that opposes gravity

Lift

The event of something being raised upward;
An elevation of the temperature in the afternoon
A raising of the land resulting from volcanic activity

Lift

A wave that lifts the surface of the water or ground

Lift

A powered conveyance that carries skiers up a hill

Lift

A device worn in a shoe or boot to make the wearer look taller or to correct a shortened leg

Lift

One of the layers forming the heel of a shoe or boot

Lift

Lifting device consisting of a platform or cage that is raised and lowered mechanically in a vertical shaft in order to move people from one floor to another in a building

Lift

Plastic surgery to remove wrinkles and other signs of aging from your face; an incision is made near the hair line and skin is pulled back and excess tissue is excised;
Some actresses have more than one face lift

Lift

Transportation of people or goods by air (especially when other means of access are unavailable)

Lift

A ride in a car;
He gave me a lift home

Lift

The act of raising something;
He responded with a lift of his eyebrow
Fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up

Lift

Raise from a lower to a higher position;
Raise your hands
Lift a load

Lift

Take hold of something and move it to a different location;
Lift the box onto the table

Lift

Move upwards;
Lift one's eyes

Lift

Move upward;
The fog lifted
The smoke arose from the forest fire
The mist uprose from the meadows

Lift

Make audible;
He lifted a war whoop

Lift

Annul by recalling or rescinding;
He revoked the ban on smoking
Lift an embargo
Vacate a death sentence

Lift

Make off with belongings of others

Lift

Raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help;
Hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car

Lift

Invigorate or heighten;
Lift my spirits
Lift his ego

Lift

Raise in rank or condition;
The new law lifted many people from poverty

Lift

Take off or away by decreasing;
Lift the pressure

Lift

Rise up;
The building rose before them

Lift

Pay off (a mortgage)

Lift

Take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property

Lift

Take illegally;
Rustle cattle

Lift

Fly people or goods to or from places not accessible by other means;
Food is airlifted into Bosnia

Lift

Take (root crops) out of the ground;
Lift potatoes

Lift

Call to stop the hunt or to retire, as of hunting dogs

Lift

Rise upward, as from pressure or moisture;
The floor is lifting slowly

Lift

Put an end to;
Lift a ban
Raise a siege

Lift

Remove (hair) by scalping

Lift

Remove from a seedbed or from a nursery;
Lift the tulip bulbs

Lift

Remove from a surface;
The detective carefully lifted some fingerprints from the table

Lift

Perform cosmetic surgery on someone's face

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