VS.

Heads vs. Up

Published:
Views: 99

Headsinterjection

A shouted warning that something is falling from above, mind your heads.

Upadverb

Away from the surface of the Earth or other planet; in opposite direction to the downward pull of gravity.

‘I looked up and saw the airplane overhead.’;

Headsnoun

plural of head.

Upadverb

(intensifier) Used as an aspect marker to indicate a completed action or state Thoroughly, completely.

‘I will mix up the puzzle pieces.’; ‘Tear up the contract.’; ‘He really messed up.’; ‘Please type up our monthly report.’;

Headsnoun

(nautical) That part of older sailing ships forward of the forecastle and around the beak, used by the crew as their lavatory; still used as the word for toilets on a ship.

Upadverb

To or from one's possession or consideration.

‘I picked up some milk on the way home.’; ‘The committee will take up your request.’; ‘She had to give up her driver's license after the accident.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Headsnoun

The side of a coin that bears the picture of the head of state or similar.

‘Heads, I win.’;

Upadverb

North.

‘I will go up to New York to visit my family this weekend.’;

Headsnoun

clipping of headphones

‘Pass me the heads, I wanna listen.’;

Upadverb

To a higher level of some quantity or notional quantity, such as price, volume, pitch, happiness, etc.

‘Gold has gone up with the uncertainty in the world markets.’; ‘Turn it up, I can barely hear it.’; ‘Listen to your voice go up at the end of a question.’; ‘Cheer up, the weekend's almost here.’;

Headsnoun

Draft scheme of a bill before it is formally introduced to a parliament.

Upadverb

(rail transport) Traditional term for the direction leading to the principal terminus, towards milepost zero.

ADVERTISEMENT

Headsnoun

Tiles laid at the eaves of a house.

Upadverb

(sailing) Against the wind or current.

Headsnoun

(slang) High-grade marijuana.

Upadverb

(Cartesian graph) In a positive vertical direction.

Upadverb

(cricket) Relatively close to the batsman.

‘The bowler pitched the ball up.’;

Upadverb

Without additional ice.

‘Would you like that drink up or on ice?’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Upadverb

Towards Cambridge or Oxford.

‘She's going up to read Classics this September.’;

Upadverb

To or in a position of equal advance or equality; not short of, back of, less advanced than, away from, etc.; usually followed by to or with.

‘I was up to my chin in water.’; ‘A stranger came up and asked me for directions.’;

Upadverb

To or in a state of completion; completely; wholly; quite.

‘Drink up. The pub is closing.’; ‘Can you sum up your research?’; ‘The comet burned up in the atmosphere.’; ‘I need to sew up the hole in this shirt.’;

Upadverb

Aside, so as not to be in use.

‘to lay up riches; put up your weapons’;

Uppreposition

Toward the top of.

‘The cat went up the tree.’; ‘They walk up the steps.’;

Uppreposition

Toward the center, source, or main point of reference; toward the end at which something is attached.

‘The information made its way up the chain of command to the general.’; ‘I felt something crawling up my arm.’;

Uppreposition

Further along (in any direction).

‘Go up the street until you see the sign.’;

Uppreposition

From south to north of

Uppreposition

From the mouth towards the source (of a river or waterway).

Uppreposition

(vulgar slang) Of a man: having sex with.

‘Phwoar, look at that bird. I'd love to be up her.’;

Uppreposition

(colloquial) At (a given place, especially one imagined to be higher or more remote from a central location).

Upadjective

Awake.

‘I can’t believe it’s 3 a.m. and you’re still up.’;

Upadjective

Finished, to an end

‘Time is up!’;

Upadjective

In a good mood.

‘I’m feeling up today.’;

Upadjective

Willing; ready.

‘If you are up for a trip, let’s go.’;

Upadjective

Next in a sequence.

‘Smith is up to bat.’;

Upadjective

Happening; new.

‘What is up with that project at headquarters?’;

Upadjective

Facing upwards; facing toward the top.

‘Put the notebook face up on the table.’; ‘Take a break and put your feet up.’;

Upadjective

Larger; greater in quantity.

‘Sales are up from last quarter.’;

Upadjective

Ahead; leading; winning.

‘The home team were up by two goals at half-time.’;

Upadjective

Standing.

‘Get up and give her your seat.’;

Upadjective

On a higher level.

‘The new ground is up.’;

Upadjective

Available; made public.

‘The new notices are up as of last Tuesday.’;

Upadjective

Said of the higher-ranking pair in a two pair.

‘AAKK = aces up’; ‘QQ33 = queens up’;

Upadjective

Well-informed; current.

‘I’m not up on the latest news. What’s going on?’;

Upadjective

(computing) Functional; working.

‘Is the server back up?’;

Upadjective

(of a railway line or train) Traveling towards a major terminus.

‘The London train is on the up line.’;

Upadjective

Headed, or designated to go, upward, as an escalator, stairway, elevator etc.

Upadjective

(bar tending) Chilled and strained into a stemmed glass.

‘A Cosmopolitan is typically served up.’;

Upadjective

(slang) Erect.

Upadjective

(of the Sun or Moon) Above the horizon, in the sky (i.e. during daytime or night-time)

Upadjective

well-known; renowned

Upnoun

(uncountable) The direction opposed to the pull of gravity.

‘Up is a good way to go.’;

Upnoun

(countable) A positive thing.

‘I hate almost everything about my job. The only up is that it's so close to home.’;

Upnoun

An upstairs room of a two story house.

‘She lives in a two-up two-down.’;

Upverb

To increase or raise.

‘If we up the volume, we'll be able to make out the details.’; ‘We upped anchor and sailed away.’;

Upverb

To promote.

‘It wasn’t long before they upped him to Vice President.’;

Upverb

(intransitive) To act suddenly, usually with another verb.

‘He just upped and quit.’; ‘He upped and punched that guy.’;

Upverb

(intransitive) To ascend; to climb up.

Upverb

To upload.

‘100 new apps and games have just been upped.’;

Upadverb

Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of gravity; toward or in a higher place or position; above; - the opposite of down.

‘But up or down,By center or eccentric, hard to tell.’;

Upadverb

From a lower to a higher position, literally or figuratively; as, from a recumbent or sitting position; from the mouth, toward the source, of a river; from a dependent or inferior condition; from concealment; from younger age; from a quiet state, or the like; - used with verbs of motion expressed or implied.

‘But they presumed to go up unto the hilltop.’; ‘I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up.’; ‘Up rose the sun, and up rose Emelye.’; ‘We have wrought ourselves up into this degree of Christian indifference.’;

Upadverb

In a higher place or position, literally or figuratively; in the state of having arisen; in an upright, or nearly upright, position; standing; mounted on a horse; in a condition of elevation, prominence, advance, proficiency, excitement, insurrection, or the like; - used with verbs of rest, situation, condition, and the like; as, to be up on a hill; the lid of the box was up; prices are up.

‘And when the sun was up, they were scorched.’; ‘Those that were up themselves kept others low.’; ‘Helen was up - was she?’; ‘Rebels there are up,And put the Englishmen unto the sword.’; ‘His name was up through all the adjoining provinces, even to Italy and Rome; many desiring to see who he was that could withstand so many years the Roman puissance.’; ‘Thou hast fired me; my soul's up in arms.’; ‘Grief and passion are like floods raised in little brooks by a sudden rain; they are quickly up.’; ‘A general whisper ran among the country people, that Sir Roger was up.’; ‘Let us, then, be up and doing,With a heart for any fate.’;

Upadverb

To or in a position of equal advance or equality; not short of, back of, less advanced than, away from, or the like; - usually followed by to or with; as, to be up to the chin in water; to come up with one's companions; to come up with the enemy; to live up to engagements.

‘As a boar was whetting his teeth, up comes a fox to him.’;

Upadverb

To or in a state of completion; completely; wholly; quite; as, in the phrases to eat up; to drink up; to burn up; to sum up; etc.; to shut up the eyes or the mouth; to sew up a rent.

Upadverb

Aside, so as not to be in use; as, to lay up riches; put up your weapons.

‘Up, up, my friend! and quit your books,Or surely you 'll grow double.’;

Uppreposition

From a lower to a higher place on, upon, or along; at a higher situation upon; at the top of.

‘In going up a hill, the knees will be most weary; in going down, the thihgs.’;

Uppreposition

From the coast towards the interior of, as a country; from the mouth towards the source of, as a stream; as, to journey up the country; to sail up the Hudson.

Uppreposition

Upon.

Upnoun

The state of being up or above; a state of elevation, prosperity, or the like; - rarely occurring except in the phrase ups and downs.

‘They had their ups and downs of fortune.’;

Upadjective

Inclining up; tending or going up; upward; as, an up look; an up grade; the up train.

Upverb

raise;

‘up the ante’;

Upadjective

being or moving higher in position or greater in some value; being above a former position or level;

‘the anchor is up’; ‘the sun is up’; ‘he lay face up’; ‘he is up by a pawn’; ‘the market is up’; ‘the corn is up’;

Upadjective

getting higher or more vigorous;

‘its an up market’; ‘an improving economy’;

Upadjective

extending or moving toward a higher place;

‘the up staircase’; ‘a general upward movement of fish’;

Upadjective

(usually followed by `on' or `for') in readiness;

‘he was up on his homework’; ‘had to be up for the game’;

Upadjective

open;

‘the windows are up’;

Upadjective

(used of computers) operating properly;

‘how soon will the computers be up?’;

Upadjective

used up;

‘time is up’;

Upadjective

out of bed;

‘are they astir yet?’; ‘up by seven each morning’;

Upadverb

spatially or metaphorically from a lower to a higher position;

‘look up!’; ‘the music surged up’; ‘the fragments flew upwards’; ‘prices soared upwards’; ‘upwardly mobile’;

Upadverb

to a higher intensity;

‘he turned up the volume’;

Upadverb

nearer to the speaker;

‘he walked up and grabbed my lapels’;

Upadverb

to a more central or a more northerly place;

‘was transferred up to headquarters’; ‘up to Canada for a vacation’;

Upadverb

to a later time;

‘they moved the meeting date up’; ‘from childhood upward’;

Heads Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons