VS.

Hawk vs. Kite

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Hawknoun

A diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae, smaller than an eagle.

‘It is illegal to hunt hawks or other raptors in many parts of the world.’;

Kitenoun

A bird of prey of the family Accipitridae.

‘A pair of kites built a nest on the cliff.’;

Hawknoun

Any diurnal predatory terrestrial bird of similar size and and appearance to the accipitrid hawks, such as a falcon

Kitenoun

Any bird of the subfamily Milvinae, with long wings and weak legs, feeding mostly on carrion and spending long periods soaring; specifically, the red kite (Milvus milvus) and the black kite (Milvus migrans).

Hawknoun

(politics) An advocate of aggressive political positions and actions; a warmonger.

Kitenoun

A bird of the genus Elanus, having thin pointed wings, that preys on rodents and hunts by hovering; also, any bird of related genera in the subfamily Elaninae.

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Hawknoun

(game theory) An uncooperative or purely-selfish participant in an exchange or game, especially when untrusting, acquisitive or treacherous. Refers specifically to the Prisoner's Dilemma, alias the Hawk-Dove game.

Kitenoun

Some species in the subfamily Perninae.

Hawknoun

A plasterer's tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard.

Kitenoun

(figuratively) A rapacious person.

Hawknoun

A noisy effort to force up phlegm from the throat.

Kitenoun

A lightweight toy or other device, traditionally flat and shaped like a triangle with a segment of a circle attached to its base or like a quadrilateral (see sense 9), carried on the wind and tethered and controlled from the ground by one or more lines.

‘On windy spring days, we would fly kites.’;

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Hawkverb

(transitive) To hunt with a hawk.

Kitenoun

A tethered object which deflects its position in a medium by obtaining lift and drag in reaction with its relative motion in the medium.

Hawkverb

(intransitive) To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk.

‘to hawk at flies’;

Kitenoun

(astrology) A planetary configuration wherein one planet of a grand trine is in opposition to an additional fourth planet.

Hawkverb

(transitive) To sell; to offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle.

‘The vendors were hawking their wares from little tables lining either side of the market square.’;

Kitenoun

A blank cheque; a fraudulent cheque, such as one issued even though there are insufficient funds to honour it, or one that has been altered without authorization.

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Hawkverb

To cough up something from one's throat.

Kitenoun

An accommodation bill.

Hawkverb

To try to cough up something from one's throat; to clear the throat loudly.

‘Grandpa sat on the front porch, hawking and wheezing, as he packed his pipe with cheap tobacco.’;

Kitenoun

A rider who is good at climbs but less good at descents.

Hawknoun

One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the family Falconidæ. They differ from the true falcons in lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.

Kitenoun

(geometry) A polygon resembling the shape of a traditional toy kite (sense 3): a quadrilateral having two pairs of edges of equal length, the edges of each pair touching each other at one end.

‘Four-sided figures without parallel sides include trapezoids and kites.’;

Hawknoun

An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.

Kitenoun

An aeroplane or aircraft.

Hawknoun

A small board, with a handle on the under side, to hold mortar.

Kitenoun

In a square-rigged ship: originally a sail positioned above a topsail; later a lightweight sail set above the topgallants, such as a studding sail or a jib topsail.

Hawkverb

To catch, or attempt to catch, birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry.

‘A falconer Henry is, when Emma hawks.’;

Kitenoun

A supplementary sail to a mainsail.

Hawkverb

To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk; - generally with at; as, to hawk at flies.

‘A falcon, towering in her pride of place,Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed.’;

Kitenoun

The brill (Scophthalmus rhombus), a type of flatfish.

Hawkverb

To clear the throat with an audible sound by forcing an expiratory current of air through the narrow passage between the depressed soft palate and the root of the tongue, thus aiding in the removal of foreign substances.

Kitenoun

A (usually concealed) letter or oral message, especially one passed illegally into, within, or out of a prison.

Hawkverb

To raise by hawking, as phlegm.

Kitenoun

The stomach; the belly.

Hawkverb

To offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.

‘His works were hawked in every street.’;

Kitenoun

(Egyptology) A measure of weight equivalent to 0.1 deben (about 0.32 ounces or 9.1 grams).

Hawknoun

diurnal bird of prey typically having short rounded wings and a long tail

Kiteverb

(transitive) To cause (something) to move upwards rapidly like a toy kite; also to cause (something, such as costs) to increase rapidly.

‘Rising interest rates have kited the cost of housing.’;

Hawknoun

an advocate of an aggressive policy on foreign relations

Kiteverb

To tamper with a medical prescription, increasing the number of pills or other items.

Hawknoun

a square board with a handle underneath; used by masons to hold or carry mortar

Kiteverb

To keep ahead of (an enemy) in order to attack repeatedly from a distance, without exposing oneself to danger.

Hawkverb

sell or offer for sale from place to place

Kiteverb

(ambitransitive) To (cause to) glide in the manner of a bird.

‘The wind kited us toward shore.’;

Hawkverb

hunt with hawks;

‘the Arabs like to hawk in the desert’;

Kiteverb

To write or present (a cheque) on an account with insufficient funds, either to defraud or expecting that funds will become available by the time the cheque clears.

‘He was convicted of kiting checks and sentenced to two years in prison.’;

Hawkverb

clear mucus or food from one's throat;

‘he cleared his throat before he started to speak’;

Kiteverb

To steal.

Hawk

Hawks are a group of medium-sized diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae. Hawks are widely distributed and vary greatly in size.

Kiteverb

Usually preceded by an inflection of go: to fly a toy kite.

‘I’m going kiting this weekend.’;

Kiteverb

(intransitive) To travel by kite, as when kitesurfing.

‘We spent the afternoon kiting around the bay.’;

Kiteverb

To move rapidly; to rush.

Kiteverb

To deflect sideways in the water.

Kiteverb

To pass a (usually concealed) letter or oral message, especially illegally into, within, or out of a prison.

Kitenoun

Any raptorial bird of the subfamily Milvinæ, of which many species are known. They have long wings, adapted for soaring, and usually a forked tail.

Kitenoun

Fig.: One who is rapacious.

‘Detested kite, thou liest.’;

Kitenoun

A light frame of wood or other material covered with paper or cloth, for flying in the air at the end of a string.

Kitenoun

A lofty sail, carried only when the wind is light.

Kitenoun

A quadrilateral, one of whose diagonals is an axis of symmetry.

Kitenoun

Fictitious commercial paper used for raising money or to sustain credit, as a check which represents no deposit in bank, or a bill of exchange not sanctioned by sale of goods; an accommodation check or bill.

Kitenoun

The brill.

Kitenoun

A form of drag to be towed under water at any depth up to about forty fathoms, which on striking bottom is upset and rises to the surface; - called also sentry.

Kitenoun

The belly.

Kiteverb

To raise money by "kites;" as, kiting transactions. See Kite, 6.

Kitenoun

a bank check that has been fraudulently altered to increase its face value

Kitenoun

a bank check drawn on insufficient funds at another bank in order to take advantage of the float

Kitenoun

plaything consisting of a light frame covered with tissue paper; flown in wind at end of a string

Kitenoun

any of several small graceful hawks of the family Accipitridae having long pointed wings and feeding on insects and small animals

Kiteverb

increase the amount (of a check) fraudulently;

‘He kited many checks’;

Kiteverb

get credit or money by using a bad check;

‘The businessman kited millions of dollars’;

Kiteverb

soar or fly like a kite;

‘The pilot kited for a long time over the mountains’;

Kiteverb

fly a kite;

‘Kids were kiting in the park’; ‘They kited the Red Dragon model’;

Kite

A kite is a tethered heavier-than-air or lighter-than-air craft with wing surfaces that react against the air to create lift and drag forces. A kite consists of wings, tethers and anchors.

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