VS.

Hatch vs. Ship

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Hatchnoun

A horizontal door in a floor or ceiling.

Shipnoun

A water-borne vessel generally larger than a boat.

Hatchnoun

An opening in a wall at window height for the purpose of serving food or other items. A pass through.

‘The cook passed the dishes through the serving hatch.’;

Shipnoun

A sailing vessel with three or more square-rigged masts.

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Hatchnoun

A small door in large mechanical structures and vehicles such as aircraft and spacecraft often provided for access for maintenance.

Shipnoun

A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.

Hatchnoun

An opening through the deck of a ship or submarine.

Shipnoun

(cartomancy) The third card of the Lenormand deck.

Hatchnoun

(slang) A gullet.

Shipnoun

(fandom) A fictional romantic relationship between two characters, either real or themselves fictional.

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Hatchnoun

A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.

Shipverb

(transitive) To send by water-borne transport.

Hatchnoun

A floodgate; a sluice gate.

Shipverb

(transitive) To send (a parcel or container) to a recipient (by any means of transport).

‘to ship freight by railroad’;

Hatchnoun

(Scotland) A bedstead.

Shipverb

(ambitransitive) To release a product to vendors; to launch.

‘Our next issue ships early next year.’; ‘The developers had to ship the game two weeks late.’;

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Hatchnoun

(mining) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.

Shipverb

(ambitransitive) To engage to serve on board a vessel.

‘to ship seamen’; ‘I shipped on a man-of-war.’;

Hatchnoun

The act of hatching.

Shipverb

(intransitive) To embark on a ship.

Hatchnoun

Development; disclosure; discovery.

Shipverb

To put in its place.

‘to ship the tiller or rudder’;

Hatchnoun

(poultry) A group of birds that emerged from eggs at a specified time.

‘These pullets are from an April hatch.’;

Shipverb

(transitive) To take in (water) over the sides of a vessel.

‘We were shipping so much water I was sure we would capsize.’;

Hatchnoun

(often as mayfly hatch) The phenomenon, lasting 1–2 days, of large clouds of mayflies appearing in one location to mate, having reached maturity.

Shipverb

(transitive) To pass (from one person to another).

‘Can you ship me the ketchup?’;

Hatchnoun

(informal) A birth, the birth records (in the newspaper) — compare the phrase "hatched, matched, and dispatched."

Shipverb

To go all in.

Hatchverb

(transitive) To close with a hatch or hatches.

Shipverb

(sports) To trade or send a player to another team.

‘Twins ship Delmon Young to Tigers.’;

Hatchverb

(intransitive) (of young animals) To emerge from an egg.

Shipverb

(rugby) To bungle a kick and give the opposing team possession.

Hatchverb

(intransitive) (of eggs) To break open when a young animal emerges from it.

Shipverb

(fandom) To support or approve of a fictional romantic relationship between two characters, either real or themselves fictional, typically in fan fiction.

‘I ship Kirk and Spock in “Star Trek”.’; ‘I ship Peggy and Angie in “Marvel's Agent Carter”.’;

Hatchverb

(transitive) To incubate eggs; to cause to hatch.

Shipnoun

Pay; reward.

‘In withholding or abridging of the ship or the hire or the wages of servants.’;

Hatchverb

(transitive) To devise.

Shipnoun

Any large seagoing vessel.

‘Like a stately ship . . . With all her bravery on, and tackle trim,Sails filled, and streamers waving.’; ‘Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State!’;

Hatchverb

(transitive) To shade an area of (a drawing, diagram, etc.) with fine parallel lines, or with lines which cross each other (cross-hatch).

Shipnoun

Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix.

Hatchverb

To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.

Shipnoun

A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.

Hatchverb

To cross with lines in a peculiar manner in drawing and engraving. See Hatching.

‘Shall win this sword, silvered and hatched.’; ‘Those hatching strokes of the pencil.’;

Shipverb

To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water.

‘The timber was . . . shipped in the bay of Attalia, from whence it was by sea transported to Pelusium.’;

Hatchverb

To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.

‘His weapon hatched in blood.’;

Shipverb

By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad.

Hatchverb

To produce, as young, from an egg or eggs by incubation, or by artificial heat; to produce young from (eggs); as, the young when hatched.

‘As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not.’; ‘For the hens do not sit upon the eggs; but by keeping them in a certain equal heat they [the husbandmen] bring life into them and hatch them.’;

Shipverb

Hence, to send away; to get rid of.

Hatchverb

To contrive or plot; to form by meditation, and bring into being; to originate and produce; to concoct; as, to hatch mischief; to hatch heresy.

‘Fancies hatchedIn silken-folded idleness.’;

Shipverb

To engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen.

Hatchverb

To produce young; - said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; - said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.

Shipverb

To receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea.

Hatchverb

To close with a hatch or hatches.

‘'T were not amiss to keep our door hatched.’;

Shipverb

To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder.

Hatchnoun

The act of hatching.

Shipverb

To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war.

Hatchnoun

Development; disclosure; discovery.

Shipverb

To embark on a ship.

Hatchnoun

The chickens produced at once or by one incubation; a brood.

Shipnoun

a vessel that carries passengers or freight

Hatchnoun

A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set with spikes on the upper edge.

‘In at the window, or else o'er the hatch.’;

Shipverb

transport commercially

Hatchnoun

A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.

Shipverb

hire for work on a ship

Hatchnoun

A flood gate; a sluice gate.

Shipverb

go on board

Hatchnoun

A bedstead.

Shipverb

travel by ship

Hatchnoun

An opening in the deck of a vessel or floor of a warehouse which serves as a passageway or hoistway; a hatchway; also; a cover or door, or one of the covers used in closing such an opening.

Shipverb

place on board a ship;

‘ship the cargo in the hold of the vessel’;

Hatchnoun

An opening into, or in search of, a mine.

Ship

A ship is a large watercraft that travels the world's oceans and other sufficiently deep waterways, carrying goods or passengers, or in support of specialized missions, such as defense, research, and fishing. Ships are generally distinguished from boats, based on size, shape, load capacity, and tradition.

Hatchnoun

the production of young from an egg

Hatchnoun

shading consisting of multiple crossing lines

Hatchnoun

a movable barrier covering a hatchway

Hatchverb

emerge from the eggs;

‘young birds, fish, and reptiles hatch’;

Hatchverb

devise or invent;

‘He thought up a plan to get rich quickly’; ‘no-one had ever thought of such a clever piece of software’;

Hatchverb

inlay with narrow strips or lines of a different substance such as gold or silver, for the purpose of decorating

Hatchverb

draw, cut, or engrave lines, usually parallel, on metal, wood, or paper;

‘hatch the sheet’;

Hatchverb

sit on (eggs);

‘Birds brood’; ‘The female covers the eggs’;

Hatchnoun

a door in an aircraft, spacecraft, or submarine.

Hatchnoun

the rear door of a hatchback car

‘a spare wheel mounted on the rear hatch’;

Hatchnoun

short for hatchback

Hatchnoun

a newly hatched brood

‘a hatch of mayflies’;

Hatchverb

(of an egg) open and produce a young animal

‘eggs need to be put in a warm place to hatch’;

Hatchverb

incubate (an egg).

Hatchverb

(of a young bird, fish, or reptile) emerge from its egg

‘ten little chicks hatched out’;

Hatchverb

cause (a young animal) to emerge from its egg

‘our penguins were hatched and hand-reared here’;

Hatchverb

conspire to devise (a plot or plan)

‘the little plot that you and Sylvia hatched up last night’;

Hatchverb

(in fine art and technical drawing) shade (an area) with closely drawn parallel lines

‘the unused space has been hatched with lines’;

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