VS.

Hatch vs. Latch

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Hatchnoun

A horizontal door in a floor or ceiling.

Latchverb

To close or lock as if with a latch.

Hatchnoun

A trapdoor.

Latchverb

(transitive) To catch; lay hold of.

Hatchnoun

An opening in a wall at window height for the purpose of serving food or other items. A pass through.

‘The cook passed the dishes through the serving hatch.’;

Latchverb

(obsolete) To smear; to anoint.

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Hatchnoun

A small door in large mechanical structures and vehicles such as aircraft and spacecraft often provided for access for maintenance.

Latchnoun

A fastening for a door that has a bar that fits into a notch or slot, and is lifted by a lever or string from either side.

Hatchnoun

An opening through the deck of a ship or submarine.

Latchnoun

A flip-flop electronic circuit

Hatchnoun

(slang) A gullet.

Latchnoun

(obsolete) A latching.

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Hatchnoun

A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.

Latchnoun

(obsolete) A crossbow.

Hatchnoun

A floodgate; a sluice gate.

Latchnoun

(obsolete) That which fastens or holds; a lace; a snare.

Hatchnoun

(Scotland) A bedstead.

Latchnoun

A breastfeeding baby's connection to the breast.

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Hatchnoun

(mining) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.

Latchnoun

(database) A lightweight lock to protect internal structures from being modified by multiple concurrent accesses.

Hatchnoun

The act of hatching.

Latchverb

To smear; to anoint.

Hatchnoun

Development; disclosure; discovery.

Latchverb

To catch so as to hold.

‘Those that remained threw darts at our men, and latching our darts, sent them again at us.’;

Hatchnoun

(poultry) A group of birds that emerged from eggs at a specified time.

‘These pullets are from an April hatch.’;

Latchverb

To catch or fasten by means of a latch.

‘The door was only latched.’;

Hatchnoun

(often as mayfly hatch) The phenomenon, lasting 1–2 days, of large clouds of mayflies appearing in one location to mate, having reached maturity.

Latchnoun

That which fastens or holds; a lace; a snare.

Hatchnoun

(informal) A birth, the birth records (in the newspaper) — compare the phrase "hatched, matched, and dispatched."

Latchnoun

A movable piece which holds anything in place by entering a notch or cavity; specifically, the catch which holds a door or gate when closed, though it be not bolted.

Hatchverb

(transitive) To close with a hatch or hatches.

Latchnoun

A latching.

Hatchverb

(intransitive) (of young animals) To emerge from an egg.

Latchnoun

A crossbow.

Hatchverb

(intransitive) (of eggs) To break open when a young animal emerges from it.

Latchnoun

spring-loaded doorlock that can only be opened from the outside with a key

Hatchverb

(transitive) To incubate eggs; to cause to hatch.

Latchnoun

catch for fastening a door or gate; a bar that can be lowered or slid into a groove

Hatchverb

(transitive) To devise.

Latchverb

fasten with a latch;

‘latch the door’;

Hatchverb

(transitive) To shade an area of (a drawing, diagram, etc.) with fine parallel lines, or with lines which cross each other (cross-hatch).

Latch

A latch or catch (called sneck in Northern England and Scotland) is a type of mechanical fastener that joins two (or more) objects or surfaces while allowing for their regular separation. A latch typically engages another piece of hardware on the other mounting surface.

Hatchverb

To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.

Hatchverb

To cross with lines in a peculiar manner in drawing and engraving. See Hatching.

‘Shall win this sword, silvered and hatched.’; ‘Those hatching strokes of the pencil.’;

Hatchverb

To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.

‘His weapon hatched in blood.’;

Hatchverb

To produce, as young, from an egg or eggs by incubation, or by artificial heat; to produce young from (eggs); as, the young when hatched.

‘As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not.’; ‘For the hens do not sit upon the eggs; but by keeping them in a certain equal heat they [the husbandmen] bring life into them and hatch them.’;

Hatchverb

To contrive or plot; to form by meditation, and bring into being; to originate and produce; to concoct; as, to hatch mischief; to hatch heresy.

‘Fancies hatchedIn silken-folded idleness.’;

Hatchverb

To produce young; - said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; - said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.

Hatchverb

To close with a hatch or hatches.

‘'T were not amiss to keep our door hatched.’;

Hatchnoun

The act of hatching.

Hatchnoun

Development; disclosure; discovery.

Hatchnoun

The chickens produced at once or by one incubation; a brood.

Hatchnoun

A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set with spikes on the upper edge.

‘In at the window, or else o'er the hatch.’;

Hatchnoun

A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.

Hatchnoun

A flood gate; a sluice gate.

Hatchnoun

A bedstead.

Hatchnoun

An opening in the deck of a vessel or floor of a warehouse which serves as a passageway or hoistway; a hatchway; also; a cover or door, or one of the covers used in closing such an opening.

Hatchnoun

An opening into, or in search of, a mine.

Hatchnoun

the production of young from an egg

Hatchnoun

shading consisting of multiple crossing lines

Hatchnoun

a movable barrier covering a hatchway

Hatchverb

emerge from the eggs;

‘young birds, fish, and reptiles hatch’;

Hatchverb

devise or invent;

‘He thought up a plan to get rich quickly’; ‘no-one had ever thought of such a clever piece of software’;

Hatchverb

inlay with narrow strips or lines of a different substance such as gold or silver, for the purpose of decorating

Hatchverb

draw, cut, or engrave lines, usually parallel, on metal, wood, or paper;

‘hatch the sheet’;

Hatchverb

sit on (eggs);

‘Birds brood’; ‘The female covers the eggs’;

Hatchnoun

a door in an aircraft, spacecraft, or submarine.

Hatchnoun

the rear door of a hatchback car

‘a spare wheel mounted on the rear hatch’;

Hatchnoun

short for hatchback

Hatchnoun

a newly hatched brood

‘a hatch of mayflies’;

Hatchverb

(of an egg) open and produce a young animal

‘eggs need to be put in a warm place to hatch’;

Hatchverb

incubate (an egg).

Hatchverb

(of a young bird, fish, or reptile) emerge from its egg

‘ten little chicks hatched out’;

Hatchverb

cause (a young animal) to emerge from its egg

‘our penguins were hatched and hand-reared here’;

Hatchverb

conspire to devise (a plot or plan)

‘the little plot that you and Sylvia hatched up last night’;

Hatchverb

(in fine art and technical drawing) shade (an area) with closely drawn parallel lines

‘the unused space has been hatched with lines’;

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