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Groove vs. Trough — What's the Difference?

Groove vs. Trough — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Groove and Trough

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Groove

A long narrow furrow or channel.

Trough

A long, narrow, generally shallow receptacle for holding water or feed for animals.

Groove

The spiral track cut into a phonograph record for the stylus to follow.

Trough

Any of various similar containers for domestic or industrial use, such as kneading or washing.

Groove

(Informal) An interesting or enjoyable rhythm in a piece of music, especially in jazz or popular music.
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Trough

A gutter under the edge of a roof for carrying off rainwater.

Groove

(Informal) A settled routine
Got into the groove of a nine-to-five job.

Trough

A long, narrow depression, as between waves or ridges.

Groove

A situation or an activity that one enjoys or to which one is especially well suited
Found his groove playing bass in a trio.

Trough

A low point in a business cycle or on a statistical graph.

Groove

A very pleasurable experience.

Trough

(Meteorology) An elongated region of relatively low atmospheric pressure, often associated with a front.

Groove

To cut a groove or grooves in.

Trough

(Physics) A minimum point in a wave or an alternating signal.

Groove

(Baseball) To throw (a pitch) over the middle of home plate, where it is likely to be hit.

Trough

A long, narrow container, open on top, for feeding or watering animals.
One of Hank's chores was to slop the pigs' trough each morning and evening.

Groove

To take great pleasure or satisfaction; enjoy oneself
Just sitting around, grooving on the music.

Trough

Any similarly shaped container.

Groove

To be affected with pleasurable excitement.

Trough

A rectangular container used for washing or rinsing clothes.
Ernest threw his paint brushes into a kind of trough he had fashioned from sheet metal that he kept in the sink.

Groove

To react or interact harmoniously.

Trough

A short, narrow canal designed to hold water until it drains or evaporates.
There was a small trough that the sump pump emptied into; it was filled with mosquito larvae.

Groove

A long, narrow channel or depression; e.g., such a slot cut into a hard material to provide a location for an engineering component, a tyre groove, or a geological channel or depression.

Trough

(Canada) A gutter under the eaves of a building; an eaves trough.
The troughs were filled with leaves and needed clearing.

Groove

A fixed routine.

Trough

A channel for conveying water or other farm liquids (such as milk) from place to place by gravity; any ‘U’ or ‘V’ cross-sectioned irrigation channel.

Groove

The middle of the strike zone in baseball where a pitch is most easily hit.

Trough

A long, narrow depression between waves or ridges; the low portion of a wave cycle.
The buoy bobbed between the crests and troughs of the waves moving across the bay.
The neurologist pointed to a troubling trough in the pattern of his brain-waves.

Groove

(music) A pronounced, enjoyable rhythm.

Trough

(economy) low turning point or a local minimum of a business cycle

Groove

A good feeling (often as in the groove).

Trough

(meteorology) A linear atmospheric depression associated with a weather front.

Groove

(mining) A shaft or excavation.

Trough

To eat in a vulgar style, as if from a trough.
He troughed his way through three meat pies.

Groove

(motorsport) A racing line, a path across the racing circuit's surface that a racecar will usually track on. (Note: There may be multiple grooves on any particular circuit or segment of circuit)

Trough

A long, hollow vessel, generally for holding water or other liquid, especially one formed by excavating a log longitudinally on one side; a long tray; also, a wooden channel for conveying water, as to a mill wheel.

Groove

(transitive) To cut a groove or channel in; to form into channels or grooves; to furrow.

Trough

Any channel, receptacle, or depression, of a long and narrow shape; as, trough between two ridges, etc.

Groove

(intransitive) To perform, dance to, or enjoy rhythmic music.
I was just starting to groove to the band when we had to leave.

Trough

The transverse section of a cyclonic area where the barometric pressure, neither rising nor falling, has reached its lowest point.

Groove

A furrow, channel, or long hollow, such as may be formed by cutting, molding, grinding, the wearing force of flowing water, or constant travel; a depressed way; a worn path; a rut.

Trough

A narrow depression (as in the earth or between ocean waves or in the ocean bed)

Groove

Hence: The habitual course of life, work, or affairs; fixed routine.
The gregarious trifling of life in the social groove.

Trough

A channel along the eaves or on the roof; collects and carries away rainwater

Groove

A shaft or excavation.

Trough

A concave shape with an open top

Groove

To cut a groove or channel in; to form into channels or grooves; to furrow.

Trough

A treasury for government funds

Groove

A long narrow furrow cut either by a natural process (such as erosion) or by a tool (as e.g. a groove in a phonograph record)

Trough

A long narrow shallow receptacle

Groove

A settled and monotonous routine that is hard to escape;
They fell into a conversational rut

Trough

A container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feed

Groove

(anatomy) any furrow or channel on a bodily structure or part

Groove

Make a groove in, or provide with a groove;
Groove a vinyl record

Groove

Hollow out in the form of a furrow or groove;
Furrow soil

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