VS.

Gossip vs. Whisper

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Gossipnoun

(countable) Someone who likes to talk about other people's private or personal business.

‘Be careful what you say to him: he’s a bit of a gossip.’;

Whispernoun

The act of speaking in a quiet voice, especially, without vibration of the vocal cords.

‘I spoke in a near whisper’;

Gossipnoun

(uncountable) Idle talk about someone’s private or personal matters, especially someone not present.

‘According to the latest gossip, their relationship is on the rocks.’; ‘I have a juicy piece of gossip to share with you.’;

Whispernoun

A rumor.

‘There are whispers of rebellion all around.’;

Gossipnoun

(uncountable) Idle conversation in general.

Whispernoun

(figurative) A faint trace or hint (of something).

‘The soup had just a whisper of basil.’;

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Gossipnoun

(uncountable) A genre in contemporary media, usually focused on the personal affairs of celebrities.

‘a gossip columnist’; ‘a gossip blog’;

Whispernoun

A low rustling sound, like that of the wind in leaves.

Gossipnoun

(obsolete) A sponsor; a godfather or godmother; the godparent of one's child.

Whispernoun

(internet) A private message to an individual in a chat room.

Gossipnoun

(obsolete) A familiar acquaintance.

Whisperverb

(intransitive) To speak softly, or under the breath, so as to be heard only by one near at hand; to utter words without sonant breath; to talk without that vibration in the larynx which gives sonorous, or vocal, sound.

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Gossipnoun

(obsolete) Title used with the name of one's child's godparent or of a friend.

Whisperverb

(transitive) To mention privately and confidentially, or in a whisper.

Gossipverb

(intransitive) To talk about someone else's private or personal business, especially in a manner that spreads the information.

Whisperverb

(intransitive) To make a low, sibilant sound.

Gossipverb

(intransitive) To talk idly.

Whisperverb

(intransitive) To speak with suspicion or timorous caution; to converse in whispers, as in secret plotting.

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Gossipverb

(obsolete) To stand godfather to; to provide godparents for.

Whisperverb

To address in a whisper, or low voice.

Gossipverb

(obsolete) To enjoy oneself during festivities, to make merry.

Whisperverb

To prompt secretly or cautiously; to inform privately.

Gossipnoun

A sponsor; a godfather or a godmother.

‘Should a great lady that was invited to be a gossip, in her place send her kitchen maid, 't would be ill taken.’;

Whisperverb

To speak softly, or under the breath, so as to be heard only by one near at hand; to utter words without sonant breath; to talk without that vibration in the larynx which gives sonorous, or vocal, sound. See Whisper, n.

Gossipnoun

A friend or comrade; a companion; a familiar and customary acquaintance.

‘My noble gossips, ye have been too prodigal.’;

Whisperverb

To make a low, sibilant sound or noise.

‘The hollow, whispering breeze.’;

Gossipnoun

One who runs house to house, tattling and telling news; an idle tattler.

‘The common chat of gossips when they meet.’;

Whisperverb

To speak with suspicion, or timorous caution; to converse in whispers, as in secret plotting.

‘All that hate me whisper together against me.’;

Gossipnoun

The tattle of a gossip; groundless rumor.

‘Bubbles o'er like a city with gossip, scandal, and spite.’;

Whisperverb

To utter in a low and nonvocal tone; to say under the breath; hence, to mention privately and confidentially, or in a whisper.

‘They might buzz and whisper it one to another.’;

Gossipverb

To stand sponsor to.

Whisperverb

To address in a whisper, or low voice.

‘And whisper one another in the ear.’; ‘Where gentlest breezes whisper souls distressed.’;

Gossipverb

To make merry.

Whisperverb

To prompt secretly or cautiously; to inform privately.

Gossipverb

To prate; to chat; to talk much.

Whispernoun

A low, soft, sibilant voice or utterance, which can be heard only by those near at hand; voice or utterance that employs only breath sound without tone, friction against the edges of the vocal cords and arytenoid cartilages taking the place of the vibration of the cords that produces tone; sometimes, in a limited sense, the sound produced by such friction as distinguished from breath sound made by friction against parts of the mouth. See Voice, n., 2, and Guide to Pronunciation, 5, 153, 154.

‘The inward voice or whisper can not give a tone.’; ‘Soft whispers through the assembly went.’;

Gossipverb

To run about and tattle; to tell idle tales.

Whispernoun

A cautious or timorous speech.

Gossipnoun

light informal conversation for social occasions

Whispernoun

Something communicated in secret or by whispering; a suggestion or insinuation.

Gossipnoun

a report (often malicious) about the behavior of other people;

‘the divorce caused much gossip’;

Whispernoun

A low, sibilant sound.

Gossipnoun

a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others

Whispernoun

speaking softly without vibration of the vocal cords

Gossipverb

wag one's tongue; speak about others and reveal secrets or intimacies;

‘She won't dish the dirt’;

Whispernoun

the light noise like the noise of silk clothing or leaves blowing in the wind

Gossipverb

talk socially without exchanging too much information;

‘the men were sitting in the cafe and shooting the breeze’;

Whisperverb

speak softly; in a low voice

Gossip

Gossip is idle talk or rumour, especially about the personal or private affairs of others; the act is also known as dishing or tattling.Gossip is a topic of research in evolutionary psychology, which has found gossip to be an important means for people to monitor cooperative reputations and so maintain widespread indirect reciprocity. Indirect reciprocity is a social interaction in which one actor helps another and is then benefited by a third party.

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