VS.

Gossip vs. Tattle

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Gossipnoun

(countable) Someone who likes to talk about other people's private or personal business.

‘Be careful what you say to him: he’s a bit of a gossip.’;

Tattleverb

(intransitive) To chatter; to gossip.

Gossipnoun

(uncountable) Idle talk about someone’s private or personal matters, especially someone not present.

‘According to the latest gossip, their relationship is on the rocks.’; ‘I have a juicy piece of gossip to share with you.’;

Tattleverb

Often said of children: to report incriminating information about another person, or a person's wrongdoing; to tell on somebody.

Gossipnoun

(uncountable) Idle conversation in general.

Tattleverb

To speak like a baby or young child; to babble, to prattle; to speak haltingly; to stutter.

Gossipnoun

(uncountable) A genre in contemporary media, usually focused on the personal affairs of celebrities.

‘a gossip columnist’; ‘a gossip blog’;

Tattlenoun

(countable) A tattletale.

Gossipnoun

(obsolete) A sponsor; a godfather or godmother; the godparent of one's child.

Tattlenoun

Often said of children: a piece of incriminating information or an account of wrongdoing that is said about another person.

Gossipnoun

(obsolete) A familiar acquaintance.

Tattlenoun

(uncountable) Idle talk; gossip; (countable) an instance of such talk or gossip.

Gossipnoun

(obsolete) Title used with the name of one's child's godparent or of a friend.

Tattleverb

To prate; to talk idly; to use many words with little meaning; to chat.

‘The tattling quality of age, which is always narrative.’;

Gossipverb

(intransitive) To talk about someone else's private or personal business, especially in a manner that spreads the information.

Tattleverb

To tell tales; to communicate secrets; to be a talebearer; as, a tattling girl.

Gossipverb

(intransitive) To talk idly.

Tattlenoun

Idle talk or chat; trifling talk; prate.

‘[They] told the tattle of the day.’;

Gossipverb

(obsolete) To stand godfather to; to provide godparents for.

Tattlenoun

disclosing information or giving evidence about another

Gossipverb

(obsolete) To enjoy oneself during festivities, to make merry.

Tattleverb

speak (about unimportant matters) rapidly and incessantly

Gossipnoun

A sponsor; a godfather or a godmother.

‘Should a great lady that was invited to be a gossip, in her place send her kitchen maid, 't would be ill taken.’;

Tattleverb

divulge confidential information or secrets;

‘Be careful--his secretary talks’;

Gossipnoun

A friend or comrade; a companion; a familiar and customary acquaintance.

‘My noble gossips, ye have been too prodigal.’;

Tattleverb

gossip idly

‘according to some tattling sources, he never quite gave her up’;

Gossipnoun

One who runs house to house, tattling and telling news; an idle tattler.

‘The common chat of gossips when they meet.’;

Tattleverb

report another's wrongdoing; tell tales

‘I would tattle on her whenever I had hard evidence’; ‘he never tattled or told tales’;

Gossipnoun

The tattle of a gossip; groundless rumor.

‘Bubbles o'er like a city with gossip, scandal, and spite.’;

Tattlenoun

gossip; idle talk

‘for each story of mine, a titbit of town tattle must be exchanged’;

Gossipverb

To stand sponsor to.

Gossipverb

To make merry.

Gossipverb

To prate; to chat; to talk much.

Gossipverb

To run about and tattle; to tell idle tales.

Gossipnoun

light informal conversation for social occasions

Gossipnoun

a report (often malicious) about the behavior of other people;

‘the divorce caused much gossip’;

Gossipnoun

a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others

Gossipverb

wag one's tongue; speak about others and reveal secrets or intimacies;

‘She won't dish the dirt’;

Gossipverb

talk socially without exchanging too much information;

‘the men were sitting in the cafe and shooting the breeze’;

Gossip

Gossip is idle talk or rumour, especially about the personal or private affairs of others; the act is also known as dishing or tattling.Gossip is a topic of research in evolutionary psychology, which has found gossip to be an important means for people to monitor cooperative reputations and so maintain widespread indirect reciprocity. Indirect reciprocity is a social interaction in which one actor helps another and is then benefited by a third party.

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