VS.

Gavel vs. Javel

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Gavelnoun

(historical) Rent.

Javelnoun

(obsolete) A vagabond.

Gavelnoun

(obsolete) Usury; interest on money.

Javelnoun

A vagabond.

Gavelnoun

(historical) An old Saxon and Welsh form of tenure by which an estate passed, on the holder's death, to all the sons equally.

Gavelnoun

A wooden mallet, used by a courtroom judge (not UK), or by a committee chairman, struck against a sounding block to quieten those present, or by an auctioneer to accept the highest bid at auction.

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Gavelnoun

The legal system as a whole (not UK).

Gavelnoun

A mason's setting maul.

Gavelnoun

A small heap of grain, not tied up into a bundle.

Gavelverb

To use a gavel.

‘The judge gavelled for order in the courtroom after the defendant burst out with a confession.’;

Gavelnoun

A gable.

Gavelnoun

A small heap of grain, not tied up into a bundle.

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Gavelnoun

The mallet of the presiding officer in a legislative body, public assembly, court, masonic body, etc.

Gavelnoun

A mason's setting maul.

Gavelnoun

Tribute; toll; custom. [Obs.] See Gabel.

Gavelnoun

a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judge

Gavelnoun

a small hammer with which an auctioneer, a judge, or the chair of a meeting hits a surface to call for attention or order.

Gavelverb

bring (a hearing or person) to order by use of a gavel

‘he gavelled the convention to order’;

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Gavel

A gavel is a small ceremonial mallet commonly made of hardwood, typically fashioned with a handle. It can be used to call for attention or to punctuate rulings and proclamations and is a symbol of the authority and right to act officially in the capacity of a presiding officer.

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