VS.

Fruitful vs. Flourish

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Fruitfuladjective

Favourable to the growth of fruit or useful vegetation; not barren.

Flourishverb

(intransitive) To thrive or grow well.

‘The barley flourished in the warm weather.’;

Fruitfuladjective

Being productive in any sense; yielding benefits.

‘The extra work in the office turned out to be fruitful after all—I got promoted’;

Flourishverb

(intransitive) To prosper or fare well.

‘The town flourished with the coming of the railway.’; ‘The cooperation flourished as the customers rushed in the business.’;

Fruitfuladjective

Full of fruit; producing fruit abundantly; bearing results; prolific; fertile; liberal; bountiful; as, a fruitful tree, or season, or soil; a fruitful wife.

‘Be fruitful and multiply and replenish the earth.’; ‘[Nature] By disburdening growsMore fruitful.’; ‘The great fruitfulness of the poet's fancy.’;

Flourishverb

(intransitive) To be in a period of greatest influence.

‘His writing flourished before the war.’;

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Fruitfuladjective

productive or conducive to producing in abundance;

‘be fruitful and multiply’;

Flourishverb

(transitive) To develop; to make thrive; to expand.

Fruitfuladjective

productive of profit;

‘a profitable enterprise’; ‘a fruitful meeting’;

Flourishverb

(transitive) To make bold, sweeping movements with.

‘They flourished the banner as they stormed the palace.’;

Flourishverb

(intransitive) To make bold and sweeping, fanciful, or wanton movements, by way of ornament, parade, bravado, etc.; to play with fantastic and irregular motion.

Flourishverb

(intransitive) To use florid language; to indulge in rhetorical figures and lofty expressions.

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Flourishverb

(intransitive) To make ornamental strokes with the pen; to write graceful, decorative figures.

Flourishverb

(transitive) To adorn with beautiful figures or rhetoric; to ornament with anything showy; to embellish.

Flourishverb

(intransitive) To execute an irregular or fanciful strain of music, by way of ornament or prelude.

Flourishverb

To boast; to vaunt; to brag.

Flourishnoun

A dramatic gesture such as the waving of a flag.

‘With many flourishes of the captured banner, they marched down the avenue.’;

Flourishnoun

An ornamentation.

‘His signature ended with a flourish.’;

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Flourishnoun

(music) A ceremonious passage such as a fanfare.

‘The trumpets blew a flourish as they entered the church.’;

Flourishnoun

(architecture) A decorative embellishment on a building.

Flourishverb

To grow luxuriantly; to increase and enlarge, as a healthy growing plant; a thrive.

‘A tree thrives and flourishes in a kindly . . . soil.’;

Flourishverb

To be prosperous; to increase in wealth, honor, comfort, happiness, or whatever is desirable; to thrive; to be prominent and influental; specifically, of authors, painters, etc., to be in a state of activity or production.

‘When all the workers of iniquity do flourish.’; ‘Bad men as frequently prosper and flourish, and that by the means of their wickedness.’; ‘We sayOf those that held their heads above the crowd,They flourished then or then.’;

Flourishverb

To use florid language; to indulge in rhetorical figures and lofty expressions; to be flowery.

‘They dilate . . . and flourish long on little incidents.’;

Flourishverb

To make bold and sweeping, fanciful, or wanton movements, by way of ornament, parade, bravado, etc.; to play with fantastic and irregular motion.

‘Impetuous spreadThe stream, and smoking flourished o'er his head.’;

Flourishverb

To make ornamental strokes with the pen; to write graceful, decorative figures.

Flourishverb

To execute an irregular or fanciful strain of music, by way of ornament or prelude.

‘Why do the emperor's trumpets flourish thus?’;

Flourishverb

To boast; to vaunt; to brag.

Flourishverb

To adorn with flowers orbeautiful figures, either natural or artificial; to ornament with anything showy; to embellish.

Flourishverb

To embellish with the flowers of diction; to adorn with rhetorical figures; to grace with ostentatious eloquence; to set off with a parade of words.

‘Sith that the justice of your title to himDoth flourish the deceit.’;

Flourishverb

To move in bold or irregular figures; to swing about in circles or vibrations by way of show or triumph; to brandish.

‘And flourishes his blade in spite of me.’;

Flourishverb

To develop; to make thrive; to expand.

‘Bottoms of thread . . . which with a good needle, perhaps may be flourished into large works.’;

Flourishnoun

A flourishing condition; prosperity; vigor.

‘The Roman monarchy, in her highest flourish, never had the like.’;

Flourishnoun

Decoration; ornament; beauty.

‘The flourish of his sober youthWas the pride of naked truth.’;

Flourishnoun

Something made or performed in a fanciful, wanton, or vaunting manner, by way of ostentation, to excite admiration, etc.; ostentatious embellishment; ambitious copiousness or amplification; parade of words and figures; show; as, a flourish of rhetoric or of wit.

‘He lards with flourishes his long harangue.’;

Flourishnoun

A fanciful stroke of the pen or graver; a merely decorative figure.

‘The neat characters and flourishes of a Bible curiously printed.’;

Flourishnoun

A fantastic or decorative musical passage; a strain of triumph or bravado, not forming part of a regular musical composition; a cal; a fanfare.

‘A flourish, trumpets! strike alarum, drums!’;

Flourishnoun

The waving of a weapon or other thing; a brandishing; as, the flourish of a sword.

Flourishnoun

a showy gesture;

‘she entered with a great flourish’;

Flourishnoun

an ornamental embellishment in writing

Flourishnoun

a display of ornamental speech or language

Flourishnoun

the act of waving

Flourishnoun

(music) a short lively tune played on brass instruments;

‘he entered to a flourish of trumpets’; ‘her arrival was greeted with a rousing fanfare’;

Flourishverb

grow stronger;

‘The economy was booming’;

Flourishverb

gain in wealth

Flourishverb

move or swing back and forth;

‘She waved her gun’;

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