VS.

Foster vs. Surrogate

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Fosteradjective

Providing parental care to children not related to oneself.

‘foster parents’;

Surrogatenoun

A substitute (usually of a person, position or role).

‘A mixture of horseradish and mustard often serves as a surrogate for wasabi.’;

Fosteradjective

Receiving such care.

‘a foster child’;

Surrogatenoun

A person or animal that acts as a substitute for the social or pastoral role of another, such as a surrogate parent.

Fosteradjective

Related by such care.

‘We are a foster family.’;

Surrogatenoun

A deputy for a bishop in granting licences for marriage.

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Fosternoun

A foster parent.

‘Some fosters end up adopting.’;

Surrogatenoun

A politician or person of influence campaigning for a presidential candidate.

Fosternoun

(uncountable) The care given to another; guardianship.

Surrogatenoun

A judicial officer of limited jurisdiction, who administers matters of probate and intestate succession and, in some cases, adoptions.

Fosterverb

(transitive) To nurture or bring up offspring, or to provide similar parental care to an unrelated child.

Surrogatenoun

(computing) Any of a range of Unicode codepoints which are used in pairs in UTF-16 to represent characters beyond the Basic Multilingual Plane.

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Fosterverb

(transitive) To cultivate and grow something.

‘Our company fosters an appreciation for the arts.’;

Surrogatenoun

(economics) An ersatz good.

Fosterverb

(transitive) To nurse or cherish something.

Surrogatenoun

(databases) surrogate key.

Fosterverb

To be nurtured or trained up together.

Surrogateadjective

Of, concerning, relating to or acting as a substitute.

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Fosterverb

To feed; to nourish; to support; to bring up.

‘Some say that ravens foster forlorn children.’;

Surrogateverb

(transitive) To replace or substitute something with something else; to appoint a successor.

Fosterverb

To cherish; to promote the growth of; to encourage; to sustain and promote; as, to foster genius.

Surrogatenoun

A deputy; a delegate; a substitute.

Fosterverb

To be nourished or trained up together.

Surrogatenoun

The deputy of an ecclesiastical judge, most commonly of a bishop or his chancellor, especially a deputy who grants marriage licenses.

Fosteradjective

Relating to nourishment; affording, receiving, or sharing nourishment or nurture; - applied to father, mother, child, brother, etc., to indicate that the person so called stands in the relation of parent, child, brother, etc., as regards sustenance and nurture, but not by tie of blood.

Surrogatenoun

In some States of the United States, an officer who presides over the probate of wills and testaments and yield the settlement of estates.

Fosternoun

A forester.

Surrogatenoun

a surrogate mother.

Fosternoun

United States songwriter whose songs embody the sentiment of the South before the American Civil War (1826-1864)

Surrogateverb

To put in the place of another; to substitute.

Fosterverb

promote the growth of;

‘Foster our children's well-being and education’;

Surrogatenoun

someone who takes the place of another person

Fosterverb

bring up under fosterage; of children

Surrogatenoun

a person appointed to represent or act on behalf of others

Fosterverb

help develop, help grow;

‘nurture his talents’;

Surrogateadjective

providing or receiving nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal ties;

‘foster parent’; ‘foster child’; ‘foster home’; ‘surrogate father’;

Fosteradjective

providing or receiving nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal ties;

‘foster parent’; ‘foster child’; ‘foster home’; ‘surrogate father’;

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