VS.

Forpass vs. Cross

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Forpassverb

To go by; pass, go past; pass unnoticed; cross.

Crossnoun

A geometrical figure consisting of two straight lines or bars intersecting each other such that at least one of them is bisected by the other.

‘Put a cross for a wrong answer and a tick for a right one.’;

Forpassverb

To go beyond, exceed; surpass.

Crossnoun

(heraldry) Any geometric figure having this or a similar shape, such as a cross of Lorraine or a Maltese cross.

Forpassverb

To pass by or along; to pass over.

Crossnoun

A wooden post with a perpendicular beam attached and used (especially in the Roman Empire) to execute criminals (by crucifixion).

‘Criminals were commonly executed on a wooden cross.’;

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Crossnoun

(usually with the) The cross on which Christ was crucified.

Crossnoun

(Christianity) A hand gesture made in imitation of the shape of the Cross.

‘She made the cross after swearing.’;

Crossnoun

(Christianity) A modified representation of the crucifixion stake, worn as jewellery or displayed as a symbol of religious devotion.

‘She was wearing a cross on her necklace.’;

Crossnoun

(figurative, from Christ's bearing of the cross) A difficult situation that must be endured.

‘It's a cross I must bear.’;

Crossnoun

The act of going across; the act of passing from one side to the other

‘A quick cross of the road.’;

Crossnoun

(biology) An animal or plant produced by crossbreeding or cross-fertilization.

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Crossnoun

(by extension) A hybrid of any kind.

Crossnoun

(boxing) A hook thrown over the opponent's punch.

Crossnoun

(football) A pass in which the ball travels from by one touchline across the pitch.

Crossnoun

A place where roads intersect and lead off in four directions; a crossroad (common in UK and Irish place names such as Gerrards Cross).

Crossnoun

A monument that marks such a place. (Also common in UK or Irish place names such as Charing Cross)

Crossnoun

(obsolete) A coin stamped with the figure of a cross, or that side of such a piece on which the cross is stamped; hence, money in general.

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Crossnoun

Church lands.

Crossnoun

A line drawn across or through another line.

Crossnoun

(surveying) An instrument for laying of offsets perpendicular to the main course.

Crossnoun

A pipe-fitting with four branches whose axes usually form a right angle.

Crossnoun

(Rubik's Cube) Four edge cubies of one side that are in their right places, forming the shape of a cross.

Crossnoun

(cartomancy) The thirty-sixth Lenormand card.

Crossadjective

Transverse; lying across the main direction.

‘At the end of each row were cross benches which linked the rows.’;

Crossadjective

(archaic) Opposite, opposed to.

‘His actions were perversely cross to his own happiness.’;

Crossadjective

Opposing, adverse; being contrary to what one would hope or wish for.

Crossadjective

Bad-tempered, angry, annoyed.

‘She was rather cross about missing her train on the first day of the job.’; ‘Please don't get cross at me. (or) Please don't get cross with me.’;

Crossadjective

Made in an opposite direction, or an inverse relation; mutually inverse; interchanged.

‘cross interrogatories’; ‘cross marriages, as when a brother and sister marry persons standing in the same relation to each other’;

Crosspreposition

(archaic) across

‘She walked cross the mountains.’;

Crosspreposition

cross product of the previous vector and the following vector.

‘The Lorentz force is q times v cross B.’;

Crossverb

To make or form a cross.

Crossverb

To place across or athwart; to cause to intersect.

‘She frowned and crossed her arms.’;

Crossverb

To lay or draw something across, such as a line.

‘to cross the letter t’;

Crossverb

To mark with an X.

‘Cross the box which applies to you.’;

Crossverb

To write lines at right angles.W

Crossverb

To make the sign of the cross over oneself.

Crossverb

To move relatively.

Crossverb

(transitive) To go from one side of (something) to the other.

‘Why did the chicken cross the road?’; ‘You need to cross the street at the lights.’;

Crossverb

(intransitive) To travel in a direction or path that will intersect with that of another.

‘Ships crossing from starboard have right-of-way.’;

Crossverb

(transitive) To pass, as objects going in an opposite direction at the same time.

Crossverb

(sports) Relative movement by a player or of players.

Crossverb

(social) To oppose.

Crossverb

(transitive) To contradict (another) or frustrate the plans of.

‘"You'll rue the day you tried to cross me, Tom Hero!" bellowed the villain.’;

Crossverb

To interfere and cut off; to debar.

Crossverb

(legal) To conduct a cross examination; to question a hostile witness.

Crossverb

(biology) To cross-fertilize or crossbreed.

‘They managed to cross a sheep with a goat.’;

Crossverb

To stamp or mark a cheque in such a way as to prevent it being cashed, thus requiring it to be deposited into a bank account.

Crossnoun

A gibbet, consisting of two pieces of timber placed transversely upon one another, in various forms, as a T, or +, with the horizontal piece below the upper end of the upright, or as an X. It was anciently used in the execution of criminals.

‘Nailed to the crossBy his own nation.’;

Crossnoun

The sign or mark of the cross, made with the finger, or in ink, etc., or actually represented in some material; the symbol of Christ's death; the ensign and chosen symbol of Christianity, of a Christian people, and of Christendom.

‘The custom of making the sign of the cross with the hand or finger, as a means of conferring blessing or preserving from evil, is very old.’; ‘Before the cross has waned the crescent's ray.’; ‘Tis where the cross is preached.’;

Crossnoun

Affiction regarded as a test of patience or virtue; trial; disappointment; opposition; misfortune.

‘Heaven prepares a good man with crosses.’;

Crossnoun

A piece of money stamped with the figure of a cross, also, that side of such a piece on which the cross is stamped; hence, money in general.

‘I should bear no cross if I did bear you; for I think you have no money in your purse.’;

Crossnoun

An appendage or ornament or anything in the form of a cross; a badge or ornamental device of the general shape of a cross; hence, such an ornament, even when varying considerably from that form; thus, the Cross of the British Order of St. George and St. Michael consists of a central medallion with seven arms radiating from it.

Crossnoun

A monument in the form of a cross, or surmounted by a cross, set up in a public place; as, a market cross; a boundary cross; Charing Cross in London.

‘Dun-Edin's Cross, a pillared stone,Rose on a turret octagon.’;

Crossnoun

A common heraldic bearing, of which there are many varieties. See the Illustration, above.

Crossnoun

The crosslike mark or symbol used instead of a signature by those unable to write.

‘Five Kentish abbesses . . . .subscribed their names and crosses.’;

Crossnoun

Church lands.

Crossnoun

A line drawn across or through another line.

Crossnoun

A mixing of breeds or stock, especially in cattle breeding; or the product of such intermixture; a hybrid of any kind.

‘Toning down the ancient Viking into a sort of a cross between Paul Jones and Jeremy Diddler.’;

Crossnoun

An instrument for laying of offsets perpendicular to the main course.

Crossnoun

A pipe-fitting with four branches the axes of which usually form's right angle.

Crossadjective

Not parallel; lying or falling athwart; transverse; oblique; intersecting.

‘The cross refraction of the second prism.’;

Crossadjective

Not accordant with what is wished or expected; interrupting; adverse; contrary; thwarting; perverse.

‘The cross and unlucky issue of my design.’; ‘The article of the resurrection seems to lie marvelously cross to the common experience of mankind.’; ‘We are both love's captives, but with fates so cross,One must be happy by the other's loss.’;

Crossadjective

Characterized by, or in a state of, peevishness, fretfulness, or ill humor; as, a cross man or woman.

‘He had received a cross answer from his mistress.’;

Crossadjective

Made in an opposite direction, or an inverse relation; mutually inverse; interchanged; as, cross interrogatories; cross marriages, as when a brother and sister marry persons standing in the same relation to each other.

Crosspreposition

Athwart; across.

‘A fox was taking a walk one night cross a village.’;

Crossverb

To put across or athwart; to cause to intersect; as, to cross the arms.

Crossverb

To lay or draw something, as a line, across; as, to cross the letter t.

Crossverb

To pass from one side to the other of; to pass or move over; to traverse; as, to cross a stream.

‘A hunted hare . . . crosses and confounds her former track.’;

Crossverb

To pass, as objects going in an opposite direction at the same time.

Crossverb

To run counter to; to thwart; to obstruct; to hinder; to clash or interfere with.

‘In each thing give him way; cross him in nothing.’; ‘An oyster may be crossed in love.’;

Crossverb

To interfere and cut off; to debar.

‘To cross me from the golden time I look for.’;

Crossverb

To make the sign of the cross upon; - followed by the reflexive pronoun; as, he crossed himself.

Crossverb

To cancel by marking crosses on or over, or drawing a line across; to erase; - usually with out, off, or over; as, to cross out a name.

Crossverb

To cause to interbreed; - said of different stocks or races; to mix the breed of.

Crossverb

To lie or be athwart.

Crossverb

To move or pass from one side to the other, or from place to place; to make a transit; as, to cross from New York to Liverpool.

Crossverb

To be inconsistent.

‘Men's actions do not always cross with reason.’;

Crossverb

To interbreed, as races; to mix distinct breeds.

‘If two individuals of distinct races cross, a third is invariably produced different from either.’;

Crossnoun

a wooden structure consisting of an upright post with a transverse piece

Crossnoun

marking consisting of crossing lines

Crossnoun

a cross as an emblem of Christianity; used in heraldry

Crossnoun

any affliction that causes great suffering;

‘that is his cross to bear’; ‘he bears his afflictions like a crown of thorns’;

Crossnoun

an organism that is the offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock; especially offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties or breeds or species;

‘a mule is a cross between a horse and a donkey’;

Crossnoun

(genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids

Crossverb

travel across or pass over;

‘The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day’;

Crossverb

meet at a point

Crossverb

hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of;

‘What ultimately frustrated every challenger was Ruth's amazing September surge’; ‘foil your opponent’;

Crossverb

fold so as to resemble a cross;

‘she crossed her legs’;

Crossverb

to cover or extend over an area or time period;

‘Rivers traverse the valley floor’; ‘The parking lot spans 3 acres’; ‘The novel spans three centuries’;

Crossverb

meet and pass;

‘the trains crossed’;

Crossverb

trace a line through or across;

‘cross your `t'’;

Crossverb

breed animals or plants using parents of different races and varieties;

‘cross a horse and a donkey’; ‘Mendel tried crossbreeding’; ‘these species do not interbreed’;

Crossadjective

extending or lying across; in a crosswise direction; at right angles to the long axis;

‘cross members should be all steel’; ‘from the transverse hall the stairway ascends gracefully’; ‘transversal vibrations’; ‘transverse colon’;

Crossadjective

perversely irritable

Crossnoun

a mark, object, or figure formed by two short intersecting lines or pieces (+ or ×)

‘place a cross against the preferred choice’;

Crossnoun

a cross (×) used to show that something is incorrect or unsatisfactory

‘the class sat quiet, waiting anxiously for the verdict—a tick or a large cross’;

Crossnoun

a cross-shaped decoration awarded for personal valour or indicating rank in some orders of knighthood

‘the Military Cross’;

Crossnoun

the constellation Crux.

Crossnoun

an upright post with a transverse bar, as used in antiquity for crucifixion.

Crossnoun

the cross on which Christ was crucified

‘the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross’;

Crossnoun

a cross as an emblem of Christianity

‘she wore a cross around her neck’;

Crossnoun

short for sign of the cross (see sign)

Crossnoun

a staff surmounted by a cross carried in religious processions and on ceremonial occasions before an archbishop.

Crossnoun

something unavoidable that has to be endured

‘she's just a cross we have to bear’;

Crossnoun

an animal or plant resulting from cross-breeding; a hybrid

‘a Galloway and shorthorn cross’;

Crossnoun

a mixture or compromise of two things

‘the system is a cross between a monorail and a conventional railway’;

Crossnoun

a pass of the ball across the field towards the centre close to one's opponents' goal

‘Beckham's low cross was turned into the net by Cole’;

Crossnoun

a blow given with a crosswise movement of the fist

‘a right cross’;

Crossverb

go or extend across or to the other side of (an area, stretch of water, etc.)

‘a shadow of apprehension crossed her face’; ‘two paths crossed the field’; ‘we crossed over the bridge’; ‘she has crossed the Atlantic twice’;

Crossverb

go across or climb over (an obstacle or boundary)

‘he attempted to cross the border into Jordan’; ‘we crossed over a stile’;

Crossverb

(especially of an artist or an artistic style or work) begin to appeal to a different audience, especially a wider one

‘a talented animator who crossed over to live action’;

Crossverb

pass in an opposite or different direction; intersect

‘the two lines cross at 90°’;

Crossverb

cause to intersect or lie crosswise

‘Michele sat back and crossed her arms’; ‘cross the cables in opposing directions’;

Crossverb

(of a letter) be dispatched before receipt of another from the person being written to

‘our letters crossed’;

Crossverb

draw a line or lines across; mark with a cross

‘voters should ask one question before they cross today's ballot paper’;

Crossverb

mark or annotate (a cheque), typically by drawing a pair of parallel lines across it, to indicate that it must be paid into a named bank account

‘a crossed cheque’;

Crossverb

delete a name or item on a list as being no longer required or involved

‘Liz crossed off the days on the calendar’;

Crossverb

delete an incorrect or inapplicable word or phrase by drawing a line through it

‘cross out any portions which do not apply’;

Crossverb

(of a person) make the sign of the cross in front of one's chest as a sign of Christian reverence or to invoke divine protection

‘Beatie crossed herself quickly at the mention of the dead’;

Crossverb

pass (the ball) across the field towards the centre when attacking

‘he could not get to the line to cross the ball’; ‘Powell crossed from the left’;

Crossverb

cause (an animal of one species, breed, or variety) to breed with one of another species, breed, or variety

‘many animals of the breed were crossed with the closely related Guernsey’;

Crossverb

cross-fertilize (a plant)

‘a hybrid tea was crossed with a polyantha rose’;

Crossverb

oppose or stand in the way of (someone)

‘no one dared cross him’;

Crossadjective

annoyed

‘he seemed to be very cross about something’;

Cross

A cross is a geometrical figure consisting of two intersecting lines or bars, usually perpendicular to each other. The lines usually run vertically and horizontally.

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