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Forgive vs. Excuse

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Forgiveverb

(transitive) To pardon; to waive any negative feeling or desire for punishment, retribution, or compensation.

‘Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace.’;

Excuseverb

(transitive) To forgive; to pardon.

‘I excused him his transgressions.’;

Forgiveverb

(intransitive) To accord forgiveness.

‘Only the brave know how to forgive...A coward never forgave; it is not in his nature. - Laurence Sterne’;

Excuseverb

(transitive) To allow to leave, or release from any obligation.

‘May I be excused from the table?’; ‘I excused myself from the proceedings to think over what I'd heard.’;

Forgiveverb

To give wholly; to make over without reservation; to resign.

‘To them that list the world's gay shows I leave,And to great ones such folly do forgive.’;

Excuseverb

(transitive) To provide an excuse for; to explain, with the aim of alleviating guilt or negative judgement.

‘You know he shouldn't have done it, so don't try to excuse his behavior!’;

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Forgiveverb

To give up resentment or claim to requital on account of (an offense or wrong); to remit the penalty of; to pardon; - said in reference to the act forgiven.

‘And their sins should be forgiven them.’; ‘He forgive injures so readily that he might be said to invite them.’;

Excuseverb

To relieve of an imputation by apology or defense; to make apology for as not seriously evil; to ask pardon or indulgence for.

Forgiveverb

To cease to feel resentment against, on account of wrong committed; to give up claim to requital from or retribution upon (an offender); to absolve; to pardon; - said of the person offending.

‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.’; ‘I as free forgive you, as I would be fforgiven.’;

Excusenoun

Explanation designed to avoid or alleviate guilt or negative judgment; a plea offered in extenuation of a fault.

‘Tell me why you were late – and I don't want to hear any excuses!’;

Forgiveverb

stop blaming or grant forgiveness;

‘I forgave him his infidelity’; ‘She cannot forgive him for forgetting her birthday’;

Excusenoun

(legal) A defense to a criminal or civil charge wherein the accused party admits to doing acts for which legal consequences would normally be appropriate, but asserts that special circumstances relieve that party of culpability for having done those acts.

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Forgiveverb

absolve from payment;

‘I forgive you your debt’;

Excusenoun

, poor or lame}} An example of something that is substandard or of inferior quality.

‘That thing is a poor excuse for a gingerbread man. Hasn't anyone taught you how to bake?’; ‘He's a sorry excuse of a doctor.’;

Forgiveverb

stop feeling angry or resentful towards (someone) for an offence, flaw, or mistake

‘I'll never forgive David for the way he treated her’;

Excuseverb

To free from accusation, or the imputation of fault or blame; to clear from guilt; to release from a charge; to justify by extenuating a fault; to exculpate; to absolve; to acquit.

‘A man's persuasion that a thing is duty, will not excuse him from guilt in practicing it, if really and indeed it be against Gog's law.’;

Forgiveverb

no longer feel angry about or wish to punish (an offence, flaw, or mistake)

‘he had never found it easy to forgive and forget’; ‘I was willing to forgive all her faults for the sake of our friendship’;

Excuseverb

To pardon, as a fault; to forgive entirely, or to admit to be little censurable, and to overlook; as, we excuse irregular conduct, when extraordinary circumstances appear to justify it.

‘I must excuse what can not be amended.’;

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Forgiveverb

cancel (a debt)

‘he proposed that their debts should be forgiven’;

Excuseverb

To regard with indulgence; to view leniently or to overlook; to pardon.

‘And in our own (excuse some courtly stains.)No whiter page than Addison remains.’;

Forgiveverb

used in polite expressions as a request to excuse one's foibles, ignorance, or impoliteness

‘you will have to forgive my suspicious mind’;

Excuseverb

To free from an impending obligation or duty; hence, to disengage; to dispense with; to release by favor; also, to remit by favor; not to exact; as, to excuse a forfeiture.

‘I pray thee have me excused.’;

Excuseverb

To relieve of an imputation by apology or defense; to make apology for as not seriously evil; to ask pardon or indulgence for.

‘Think ye that we excuse ourselves to you?’;

Excusenoun

The act of excusing, apologizing, exculpating, pardoning, releasing, and the like; acquittal; release; absolution; justification; extenuation.

‘Pleading so wisely in excuse of it.’;

Excusenoun

That which is offered as a reason for being excused; a plea offered in extenuation of a fault or irregular deportment; apology; as, an excuse for neglect of duty; excuses for delay of payment.

‘Hence with denial vain and coy excuse.’;

Excusenoun

That which excuses; that which extenuates or justifies a fault.

‘If eyes were made for seeing.Then beauty is its own excuse for being.’;

Excusenoun

a defense of some offensive behavior or some failure to keep a promise etc.;

‘he kept finding excuses to stay’; ‘every day he had a new alibi for not getting a job’; ‘his transparent self-justification was unacceptable’;

Excusenoun

a note explaining an absence;

‘he had to get his mother to write an excuse for him’;

Excusenoun

a poor example;

‘it was an apology for a meal’; ‘a poor excuse for an automobile’;

Excuseverb

accept an excuse for;

‘Please excuse my dirty hands’;

Excuseverb

grant exemption or release to;

‘Please excuse me from this class’;

Excuseverb

serve as a reason or cause or justification of;

‘Your need to sleep late does not excuse your late arrival at work’; ‘Her recent divorce amy explain her reluctance to date again’;

Excuseverb

defend, explain, clear away, or make excuses for by reasoning;

‘rationalize the child's seemingly crazy behavior’; ‘he rationalized his lack of success’;

Excuseverb

ask for permission to be released from an engagement

Excuseverb

excuse, overlook, or make allowances for; be lenient with;

‘excuse someone's behavior’; ‘She condoned her husband's occasional infidelities’;

Excuse

In jurisprudence, an excuse is a defense to criminal charges that is distinct from an exculpation. Justification and excuse are different defenses in a criminal case (See Justification and excuse).

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