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Fool vs. Blooter

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Foolnoun

(pejorative) A person with poor judgment or little intelligence.

‘You were a fool to cross that busy road without looking.’; ‘The village fool threw his own shoes down the well.’;

Blooternoun

A babbler, a bumbling idiot, a fool.

Foolnoun

(historical) A jester; a person whose role was to entertain a sovereign and the court (or lower personages).

Blooternoun

(slang) A kick of a ball which is hard and, often, also wild.

Foolnoun

(informal) Someone who derives pleasure from something specified.

Blooternoun

(slang) A ball kicked in such a way.

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Foolnoun

Buddy, dude, person.

Blooternoun

An unattractive woman.

Foolnoun

(cooking) A type of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or cream.

‘an apricot fool; a gooseberry fool’;

Blooterverb

(slang) To do poor work, to botch (a job).

Foolnoun

A particular card in a tarot deck, representing a jester.

Blooterverb

To talk foolishly, to babble.

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Foolverb

To trick; to deceive

Blooterverb

To shriek, to cry in a shrill manner.

Foolverb

To act in an idiotic manner; to act foolishly

Blooterverb

(slang) To kick a ball in a hard and usually wild manner.

Fooladjective

(informal) foolish

Blooterverb

(slang) To smash; to bludgeon.

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Foolnoun

A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; - commonly called gooseberry fool.

Blooterverb

hit or kick (something) hard and wildly

‘he blootered the ball over the bar’;

Foolnoun

One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding; an idiot; a natural.

Foolnoun

A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt.

‘Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools.’; ‘Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other.’;

Foolnoun

One who acts contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person.

‘The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.’;

Foolnoun

One who counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.

‘Can they think me . . . their fool or jester?’;

Foolverb

To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth.

‘Is this a time for fooling?’;

Foolverb

To infatuate; to make foolish.

‘For, fooled with hope, men favor the deceit.’;

Foolverb

To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to fool one out of his money.

‘You are fooled, discarded, and shook offBy him for whom these shames ye underwent.’;

Foolnoun

a person who lacks good judgment

Foolnoun

a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of

Foolnoun

a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the middle ages

Foolverb

make a fool or dupe of

Foolverb

spend frivolously and unwisely;

‘Fritter away one's inheritance’;

Foolverb

fool or hoax;

‘The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone’; ‘You can't fool me!’;

Foolverb

indulge in horseplay;

‘Enough horsing around--let's get back to work!’; ‘The bored children were fooling about’;

Foolnoun

a person who acts unwisely or imprudently; a silly person

‘I felt a bit of a fool’;

Foolnoun

a person who is duped or imposed on

‘he is the fool of circumstances’;

Foolnoun

a jester or clown, especially one retained in a royal or noble household.

Foolnoun

a cold dessert made of pureed fruit mixed or served with cream or custard

‘raspberry fool with cream’;

Foolverb

trick or deceive (someone); dupe

‘don't be fooled into paying out any more of your hard-earned cash’; ‘she tried to fool herself that she had stopped loving him’;

Foolverb

act in a joking, frivolous, or teasing way

‘some lads in the pool were fooling around’;

Foolverb

engage in casual or extramarital sexual activity.

Fooladjective

foolish; silly

‘that damn fool waiter’;

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