VS.

Fly vs. Swap

Published:
Views: 4
Wikipedia
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Fly (noun)

    Any insect of the order Diptera; characterized by having two wings (except for some wingless species), also called true flies.

  • Fly (noun)

    Especially, any of the insects of the family Muscidae, such as the common housefly (other families of Diptera include mosquitoes and midges).

  • Fly (noun)

    Any similar, but unrelated insect such as dragonfly or butterfly.

  • Fly (noun)

    A lightweight fishing resembling an insect.

  • Fly (noun)

    A chest exercise performed by moving extended arms from the sides to in front of the chest. (also flye)

  • Fly (noun)

    A witch's familiar.

  • Fly (noun)

    A parasite.

  • Fly (noun)

    The butterfly stroke (plural is normally flys)

  • Fly (noun)

    A simple shaken in the air, popular in the 1960s.

  • Fly (noun)

    The action of flying; flight.

  • Fly (noun)

    An act of flying.

    "We had a quick half-hour fly back into the city."

    "There was a good wind, so I decided to give the kite a fly."

  • Fly (noun)

    A fly ball.

  • Fly (noun)

    A type of small, fast carriage (sometimes pluralised flys).

  • Fly (noun)

    A piece of canvas that covers the opening at the front of a tent.

  • Fly (noun)

    A strip of material (sometimes hiding zippers or buttons) at the front of a pair of trousers, pants, underpants, bootees, etc.

    "Ha-ha! Your flies are undone!"

  • Fly (noun)

    The free edge of a flag.

  • Fly (noun)

    The horizontal length of a flag.

  • Fly (noun)

    An exercise that involves wide opening and closing of the arms perpendicular to the shoulders.

  • Fly (noun)

    The part of a vane pointing the direction from which the wind blows.

  • Fly (noun)

    That part of a compass on which the points are marked; the compass card.

  • Fly (noun)

    Two or more vanes set on a revolving axis, to act as a fanner, or to equalize or impede the motion of machinery by the resistance of the air, as in the striking part of a clock.

  • Fly (noun)

    A heavy wheel, or cross arms with weights at the ends on a revolving axis, to regulate or equalize the motion of machinery by means of its inertia, where the power communicated, or the resistance to be overcome, is variable, as in the steam engine or the coining press. See flywheel.

  • Fly (noun)

    A light horse-drawn carriage that can be hired for transportation.

  • Fly (noun)

    In a knitting machine, the piece hinged to the needle, which holds the engaged loop in position while the needle is penetrating another loop; a latch.

  • Fly (noun)

    The pair of arms revolving around the bobbin, in a spinning wheel or spinning frame, to twist the yarn.

  • Fly (noun)

    A shuttle driven through the shed by a blow or jerk.

  • Fly (noun)

    The person who took the printed sheets from the press.

  • Fly (noun)

    A vibrating frame with fingers, attached to a power printing press for doing the same work.

  • Fly (noun)

    One of the upper screens of a stage in a theatre.

  • Fly (noun)

    waste cotton

  • Fly (noun)

    A wing.

    "The bullet barely grazed the wild fowl's fly."

  • Fly (verb)

    To travel through the air, another gas{{,}} or a vacuum, without being in contact with a grounded surface.

    "Birds of passage fly to warmer regions as it gets colder in winter."

    "The Concorde flew from Paris to New York faster than any other passenger airplane."

    "It takes about eleven hours to fly from Frankfurt to Hongkong."

    "The little fairy flew home on the back of her friend, the giant eagle."

  • Fly (verb)

    To flee, to escape (from).

    "Fly, my lord! The enemy are upon us!"

  • Fly (verb)

    To cause to fly travel or float in the air: to transport via air or the like.

    "Charles Lindbergh flew his airplane The Spirit of St. Louis across the Atlantic ocean."

    "Why don’t you go outside and fly kites, kids? The wind is just perfect."

    "Birds fly their prey to their nest to feed it to their young."

    "Each day the post flies thousands of letters around the globe."

  • Fly (verb)

    To be accepted, come about or work out.

    "Let's see if that idea flies."

    "You know, I just don't think that's going to fly. Why don't you spend your time on something better?"

  • Fly (verb)

    To travel very fast, hasten.

  • Fly (verb)

    To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly.

    "a door flies open;"

    "a bomb flies apart"

  • Fly (verb)

    To display (a flag) on a flagpole.

  • Fly (verb)

    To hunt with a hawk.

  • Fly (verb)

    To hit a fly ball; to hit a fly ball that is caught for an out. Compare ground (verb) and line (verb).

    "Jones flied to right in his last at-bat."

  • Fly (adjective)

    Quick-witted, alert, mentally sharp.

  • Fly (adjective)

    Well dressed, smart in appearance; in style, cool.

    "He's pretty fly."

  • Fly (adjective)

    Beautiful; displaying physical beauty.

  • Fly (adjective)

    Sneaky

  • Swap (verb)

    To exchange or give (something) in an exchange (for something else).

    "exchange|switch|trade"

  • Swap (verb)

    To hit, to strike.

  • Swap (verb)

    To beat the air, or ply the wings, with a sweeping flap.

  • Swap (verb)

    To fall; to rush hastily or violently.

  • Swap (noun)

    An exchange of two comparable things.

    "quote-book|lang=en|1819|{{w|Sir Walter Scott|w|Tales of My Landlord|section=The Bride of Lammermoor|passage=I e’en changed it, as occasion served, with the skippers o’ Dutch luggers and French vessels, for gin and brandy... a gude swap too, between what cheereth the soul of man and that which dingeth it clean out of his body}}"

  • Swap (noun)

    A financial derivative in which two parties agree to exchange one stream of cashflow against another stream.

  • Swap (noun)

    Space available in a swap file for use as auxiliary memory.

    "How much swap do you need?"

  • Swap (noun)

    A blow; a stroke.

Wiktionary
ADVERTISEMENT
Oxford Dictionary
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Fly (verb)

    To move in or pass through the air with wings, as a bird.

  • Fly (verb)

    To move through the air or before the wind; esp., to pass or be driven rapidly through the air by any impulse.

  • Fly (verb)

    To float, wave, or rise in the air, as sparks or a flag.

  • Fly (verb)

    To move or pass swiftly; to hasten away; to circulate rapidly; as, a ship flies on the deep; a top flies around; rumor flies.

  • Fly (verb)

    To run from danger; to attempt to escape; to flee; as, an enemy or a coward flies. See Note under Flee.

  • Fly (verb)

    To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly; - usually with a qualifying word; as, a door flies open; a bomb flies apart.

  • Fly

    To cause to fly or to float in the air, as a bird, a kite, a flag, etc.

  • Fly

    To fly or flee from; to shun; to avoid.

  • Fly

    To hunt with a hawk.

  • Fly

    To manage (an aircraft) in flight; as, to fly an aëroplane.

  • Fly (noun)

    Any winged insect; esp., one with transparent wings; as, the Spanish fly; firefly; gall fly; dragon fly.

  • Fly (noun)

    A hook dressed in imitation of a fly, - used for fishing.

  • Fly (noun)

    A familiar spirit; a witch's attendant.

  • Fly (noun)

    A parasite.

  • Fly (noun)

    A kind of light carriage for rapid transit, plying for hire and usually drawn by one horse.

  • Fly (noun)

    The length of an extended flag from its staff; sometimes, the length from the "union" to the extreme end.

  • Fly (noun)

    The part of a vane pointing the direction from which the wind blows.

  • Fly (noun)

    That part of a compass on which the points are marked; the compass card.

  • Fly (noun)

    Two or more vanes set on a revolving axis, to act as a fanner, or to equalize or impede the motion of machinery by the resistance of the air, as in the striking part of a clock.

  • Fly (noun)

    The piece hinged to the needle, which holds the engaged loop in position while the needle is penetrating another loop; a latch.

  • Fly (noun)

    The pair of arms revolving around the bobbin, in a spinning wheel or spinning frame, to twist the yarn.

  • Fly (noun)

    A shuttle driven through the shed by a blow or jerk.

  • Fly (noun)

    Formerly, the person who took the printed sheets from the press.

  • Fly (noun)

    The outer canvas of a tent with double top, usually drawn over the ridgepole, but so extended as to touch the roof of the tent at no other place.

  • Fly (noun)

    One of the upper screens of a stage in a theater.

  • Fly (noun)

    The fore flap of a bootee; also, a lap on trousers, overcoats, etc., to conceal a row of buttons.

  • Fly (noun)

    A batted ball that flies to a considerable distance, usually high in the air; also, the flight of a ball so struck; as, it was caught on the fly. Also called fly ball.

  • Fly (noun)

    Waste cotton.

  • Fly (adjective)

    Knowing; wide awake; fully understanding another's meaning.

  • Swap

    To strike; - with off.

  • Swap

    To exchange (usually two things of the same kind); to swop.

  • Swap (verb)

    To fall or descend; to rush hastily or violently.

  • Swap (verb)

    To beat the air, or ply the wings, with a sweeping motion or noise; to flap.

  • Swap (noun)

    A blow; a stroke.

  • Swap (noun)

    An exchange; a barter.

  • Swap (adverb)

    Hastily.

Webster Dictionary
  • Fly (noun)

    two-winged insects characterized by active flight

  • Fly (noun)

    flap consisting of a piece of canvas that can be drawn back to provide entrance to a tent

  • Fly (noun)

    an opening in a garment that is closed by a zipper or buttons concealed by a fold of cloth

  • Fly (noun)

    (baseball) a hit that flies up in the air

  • Fly (noun)

    fisherman's lure consisting of a fishhook decorated to look like an insect

  • Fly (verb)

    travel through the air; be airborne;

    "Man cannot fly"

  • Fly (verb)

    move quickly or suddenly;

    "He flew about the place"

  • Fly (verb)

    fly a plane

  • Fly (verb)

    transport by aeroplane;

    "We fly flowers from the Caribbean to North America"

  • Fly (verb)

    cause to fly or float;

    "fly a kite"

  • Fly (verb)

    be dispersed or disseminated;

    "Rumors and accusations are flying"

  • Fly (verb)

    change quickly from one emotional state to another;

    "fly into a rage"

  • Fly (verb)

    pass away rapidly;

    "Time flies like an arrow"

    "Time fleeing beneath him"

  • Fly (verb)

    travel in an airplane;

    "she is flying to Cincinnati tonight"

    "Are we driving or flying?"

  • Fly (verb)

    display in the air or cause to float;

    "fly a kite"

    "All nations fly their flags in front of the U.N."

  • Fly (verb)

    run away quickly;

    "He threw down his gun and fled"

  • Fly (verb)

    travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft;

    "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic"

  • Fly (verb)

    hit a fly

  • Fly (verb)

    decrease rapidly and disappear;

    "the money vanished in las Vegas"

    "all my stock assets have vaporized"

  • Fly (adjective)

    (British informal) not to be deceived or hoodwinked

  • Swap (noun)

    an equal exchange;

    "we had no money so we had to live by barter"

  • Swap (verb)

    exchange or give (something) in exchange for

  • Swap (verb)

    move (a piece of a program) into memory, in computer science

Princeton's WordNet

Fly Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons

Adblocker detected! Please consider reading this notice.

We've detected that you are using AdBlock Plus or some other adblocking software which is preventing the page from fully loading.

We don't have any banner, Flash, animation, obnoxious sound, or popup ad. We do not implement these annoying types of ads!

We need money to operate the site, and almost all of it comes from our online advertising.

Please add askdifference.com to your ad blocking whitelist or disable your adblocking software.

×