VS.

Fetch vs. Retch

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Fetchverb

To retrieve; to bear towards; to go and get.

Retchverb

(dialectal) to reach

Fetchverb

To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.

‘If you put some new tyres on it, and clean it up a bit, the car should fetch about $5,000’;

Retchverb

To make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; to strain, as in vomiting.

Fetchverb

(nautical) To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.

‘to fetch headway or sternway’;

Retchverb

To reck

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Fetchverb

(intransitive) To bring oneself; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.

Retchnoun

An unsuccessful effort to vomit.

Fetchverb

To take (a breath), to heave (a sigh)

Retchverb

To make an effort to vomit; to strain, as in vomiting.

‘Beloved Julia, hear me still beseeching!(Here he grew inarticulate with retching.’;

Fetchverb

To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.

Retchverb

To care for; to heed; to reck.

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Fetchverb

(obsolete) To recall from a swoon; to revive; sometimes with to.

‘to fetch a man to’;

Retchnoun

an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting;

‘a bad case of the heaves’;

Fetchverb

To reduce; to throw.

Retchverb

eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth;

‘After drinking too much, the students vomited’; ‘He purged continuously’; ‘The patient regurgitated the food we gave him last night’;

Fetchverb

To bring to accomplishment; to achieve; to make; to perform, with certain objects.

‘to fetch a compass;’; ‘to fetch a leap’;

Retchverb

make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit

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Fetchverb

To make (a pump) draw water by pouring water into the top and working the handle.

Fetchnoun

The object of fetching; the source and origin of attraction; a force, quality or propensity which is attracting eg., in a given attribute of person, place, object, principle, etc.

Fetchnoun

A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice.

Fetchnoun

(computing) The act of fetching data.

‘a fetch from a cache’;

Fetchverb

To bear toward the person speaking, or the person or thing from whose point of view the action is contemplated; to go and bring; to get.

‘Time will run back and fetch the age of gold.’; ‘He called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink. And as she was going to fetch it he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine hand.’;

Fetchverb

To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.

‘Our native horses were held in small esteem, and fetched low prices.’;

Fetchverb

To recall from a swoon; to revive; - sometimes with to; as, to fetch a man to.

‘Fetching men again when they swoon.’;

Fetchverb

To reduce; to throw.

‘The sudden trip in wrestling that fetches a man to the ground.’;

Fetchverb

To bring to accomplishment; to achieve; to make; to perform, with certain objects; as, to fetch a compass; to fetch a leap; to fetch a sigh.

‘I'll fetch a turn about the garden.’; ‘He fetches his blow quick and sure.’;

Fetchverb

To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.

‘Meantine flew our ships, and straight we fetchedThe siren's isle.’;

Fetchverb

To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.

‘They could n't fetch the butter in the churn.’;

Fetchverb

To bring one's self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.

Fetchnoun

A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice.

‘Every little fetch of wit and criticism.’;

Fetchnoun

The apparation of a living person; a wraith.

‘The very fetch and ghost of Mrs. Gamp.’;

Fetchnoun

The unobstructed region of the ocean over which the wind blows to generate waves.

Fetchnoun

The length of such a region.

Fetchverb

go or come after and bring or take back;

‘Get me those books over there, please’; ‘Could you bring the wine?’; ‘The dog fetched the hat’;

Fetchverb

be sold for a certain price;

‘The painting brought $10,000’; ‘The old print fetched a high price at the auction’;

Fetchverb

take away or remove;

‘The devil will fetch you!’;

Fetchverb

go for and then bring back (someone or something) for someone

‘he ran to fetch help’; ‘she fetched me a cup of tea’;

Fetchverb

bring forth (blood or tears)

‘kind offers fetched tears from me’;

Fetchverb

take a (breath); heave (a sigh).

Fetchverb

achieve (a particular price) when sold

‘the land could fetch over a million pounds’;

Fetchverb

inflict (a blow or slap) on (someone)

‘that brute Cullam fetched him a wallop’;

Fetchverb

cause great interest or delight in (someone)

‘that air of his always fetches women’;

Fetchnoun

the distance travelled by wind or waves across open water.

Fetchnoun

the distance a vessel must sail to reach open water.

Fetchnoun

a stratagem or trick.

Fetchnoun

the apparition or double of a living person, formerly believed to be a warning of that person's impending death.

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