VS.

Ferret vs. Out

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Ferretnoun

An often domesticated mammal (Mustela putorius furo) rather like a weasel, descended from the polecat and often trained to hunt burrowing animals.

Outadverb

Away from the inside or the centre.

‘The magician pulled the rabbit out of the hat.’;

Ferretnoun

The black-footed ferret, Mustela nigripes.

Outadverb

Away from home or one's usual place.

‘Let's eat out tonight’;

Ferretnoun

A diligent searcher.

Outadverb

Outside; not indoors.

‘Last night we slept out under the stars.’;

Ferretnoun

(dated) A tape of silk, cotton, or ribbon, used to tie documents, clothing, etc. or along the edge of fabric.

Outadverb

Away from; at a distance.

‘Keep out!’;

Ferretverb

To hunt game with ferrets.

Outadverb

Into a state of non-operation; into non-existence.

‘Switch the lights out.’; ‘Put the fire out.’;

Ferretverb

(ambitransitive) To uncover and bring to light by searching; usually to ferret out.

Outadverb

To the end; completely.

‘I hadn't finished. Hear me out.’;

Ferretnoun

An animal of the Weasel family (Mustela furo syn. Putorius furo), about fourteen inches in length, of a pale yellow or white color, with red eyes. It is a native of Africa, but has been domesticated in Europe. Ferrets are used to drive rabbits and rats out of their holes. They are sometimes kept as pets.

Outadverb

Used to intensify or emphasize.

‘The place was all decked out for the holidays.’;

Ferretnoun

A kind of narrow tape, usually made of woolen; sometimes of cotton or silk; - called also ferreting.

Outadverb

(of the sun, moon, stars, etc.) So as to be visible in the sky, and not covered by clouds, fog, etc.

‘The sun came out after the rain, and we saw a rainbow.’;

Ferretnoun

The iron used for trying the melted glass to see if is fit to work, and for shaping the rings at the mouths of bottles.

Outadverb

Of a player, so as to be disqualified from playing further by some action of a member of the opposing team (such as being stumped in cricket).

‘Wilson was bowled out for five runs.’;

Ferretverb

To drive or hunt out of a lurking place, as a ferret does the cony; to search out by patient and sagacious efforts; - often used with out; as, to ferret out a secret.

‘Master Fer! I'll fer him, and firk him, and ferret him.’;

Outpreposition

}} Away from the inside.

‘He threw it out the door.’;

Ferretnoun

ferret of prairie regions of United States; nearly extinct

Outnoun

A means of exit, escape, reprieve, etc.

‘They wrote the law to give those organizations an out.’;

Ferretnoun

domesticated albino variety of the European polecat bred for hunting rats and rabbits

Outnoun

(baseball) A state in which a member of the batting team is removed from play due to the application of various rules of the game such as striking out, hitting a fly ball which is caught by the fielding team before bouncing, etc.

Ferretverb

hound or harry relentlessly

Outnoun

(cricket) A dismissal; a state in which a member of the batting team finishes his turn at bat, due to the application of various rules of the game, such as the bowler knocking over the batsman's wicket with the ball.

Ferretverb

hunt with ferrets

Outnoun

(poker) A card which can make a hand a winner.

Ferretverb

search and discover through persistent investigation;

‘She ferreted out the truth’;

Outnoun

(dated) A trip out; an outing.

Ferret

The ferret (Mustela furo) is a domestic species of small mustelid. The only domesticated species in Mustelidae, it is thought to be a descendant of the European polecat, a mammal belonging to the same genus as the weasel, Mustela.

Outnoun

One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office.

Outnoun

A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space.

Outnoun

A word or words omitted by the compositor in setting up copy; an omission.

Outverb

(transitive) To eject; to expel.

Outverb

(transitive) To reveal (a person) to be gay, bisexual, or transgender.

Outverb

(transitive) To reveal (a person or organization) as having a certain secret, such as a being a secret agent or undercover detective.

Outverb

(transitive) To reveal (a secret).

‘A Brazilian company outed the new mobile phone design.’;

Outverb

To come or go out; to get out or away; to become public.

Outverb

To become apparent.

Outadjective

Not at home; not at one's office or place of employment.

‘I'm sorry, Mr Smith is out at the moment.’;

Outadjective

Released, available for purchase, download or other use.

‘Did you hear? Their newest CD is out!’;

Outadjective

(in various games; used especially of a batsman or batter in cricket or baseball) Dismissed from play under the rules of the game.

‘He bowls, Johnson pokes at it ... and ... Johnson is out! Caught behind by Ponsonby!’;

Outadjective

Openly acknowledging that one is queer and/or genderqueer.

‘It's no big deal to be out in the entertainment business.’;

Outadjective

(of flowers) In bloom.

‘The garden looks beautiful now that the roses are out.’;

Outadjective

(of the sun, moon or stars) Visible in the sky; not obscured by clouds.

‘The sun is out, and it's a lovely day.’;

Outadjective

(of lamps, fires etc.) Not shining or burning.

‘I called round to the house but all the lights were out and no one was home.’;

Outadjective

(of ideas, plans, etc.) Discarded; no longer a possibility.

‘Right, so that idea's out. Let's move on to the next one.’;

Outadjective

No longer popular or in fashion.

‘Black is out this season. The new black is white.’;

Outadjective

Without; no longer in possession of; not having more

‘Do you have any bread? Sorry, we're out.’;

Outadjective

(of calculations or measurements) Containing errors or discrepancies; in error by a stated amount.

‘Nothing adds up in this report. All these figures are out.’; ‘The measurement was out by three millimetres.’;

Outadjective

(obsolete) Of a young lady: having entered society and available to be courted.

Outinterjection

A radio procedure word meaning that the station is finished with its transmission and does not expect a response.

‘Destruction. Two T-72s destroyed. Three foot mobiles down. Out.’;

Outinterjection

Get out; begone; away!

Outadverb

In its original and strict sense, out means from the interior of something; beyond the limits or boundary of somethings; in a position or relation which is exterior to something; - opposed to in or into. The something may be expressed after of, from, etc. (see Out of, below); or, if not expressed, it is implied; as, he is out; or, he is out of the house, office, business, etc.; he came out; or, he came out from the ship, meeting, sect, party, etc.

Outadverb

Away; abroad; off; from home, or from a certain, or a usual, place; not in; not in a particular, or a usual, place; as, the proprietor is out, his team was taken out. Opposite of in.

‘He hath been out (of the country) nine years.’;

Outadverb

Beyond the limits of concealment, confinement, privacy, constraint, etc., actual or figurative; hence, not in concealment, constraint, etc., in, or into, a state of freedom, openness, disclosure, publicity, etc.; a matter of public knowledge; as, the sun shines out; he laughed out, to be out at the elbows; the secret has leaked out, or is out; the disease broke out on his face; the book is out.

‘Leaves are out and perfect in a month.’; ‘She has not been out [in general society] very long.’;

Outadverb

Beyond the limit of existence, continuance, or supply; to the end; completely; hence, in, or into, a condition of extinction, exhaustion, completion; as, the fuel, or the fire, has burned out; that style is on the way out.

‘Deceitful men shall not live out half their days.’; ‘When the butt is out, we will drink water.’;

Outadverb

Beyond possession, control, or occupation; hence, in, or into, a state of want, loss, or deprivation; - used of office, business, property, knowledge, etc.; as, the Democrats went out and the Whigs came in; he put his money out at interest.

‘I have forgot my part, and I am out.’;

Outadverb

Beyond the bounds of what is true, reasonable, correct, proper, common, etc.; in error or mistake; in a wrong or incorrect position or opinion; in a state of disagreement, opposition, etc.; in an inharmonious relation.

‘Wicked men are strangely out in the calculating of their own interest.’; ‘Very seldom out, in these his guesses.’;

Outadverb

Not in the position to score in playing a game; not in the state or turn of the play for counting or gaining scores.

Outadverb

Out of fashion; unfashionable; no longer in current vogue; unpopular.

Outnoun

One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office; - generally in the plural.

Outnoun

A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space; - chiefly used in the phrase ins and outs; as, the ins and outs of a question. See under In.

Outnoun

A word or words omitted by the compositor in setting up copy; an omission.

Outverb

To cause to be out; to eject; to expel.

‘A king outed from his country.’; ‘The French have been outed of their holds.’;

Outverb

To come out with; to make known.

Outverb

To give out; to dispose of; to sell.

Outverb

To come or go out; to get out or away; to become public.

Outinterjection

Expressing impatience, anger, a desire to be rid of; - with the force of command; go out; begone; away; off.

‘Out, idle words, servants to shallow fools!’;

Outnoun

(baseball) a failure by a batter or runner to reach a base safely in baseball;

‘you only get 3 outs per inning’;

Outverb

to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality;

‘This actor outed last year’;

Outverb

reveal somebody else's homosexuality;

‘This actor was outed last week’;

Outverb

be made known; be disclosed or revealed;

‘The truth will out’;

Outadjective

not allowed to continue to bat or run;

‘he was tagged out at second on a close play’; ‘he fanned out’;

Outadjective

of a fire; being out or having grown cold;

‘threw his extinct cigarette into the stream’; ‘the fire is out’;

Outadjective

not worth considering as a possibility;

‘a picnic is out because of the weather’;

Outadjective

out of power; especially having been unsuccessful in an election;

‘now the Democrats are out’;

Outadjective

excluded from use or mention;

‘forbidden fruit’; ‘in our house dancing and playing cards were out’; ‘a taboo subject’;

Outadjective

directed outward or serving to direct something outward;

‘the out doorway’; ‘the out basket’;

Outadjective

no longer fashionable;

‘that style is out these days’;

Outadjective

outside or external;

‘the out surface of a ship's hull’;

Outadjective

outer or outlying;

‘the out islands’;

Outadjective

knocked unconscious by a heavy blow

Outadverb

outside of an enclosed space;

‘she is out’;

Outadverb

outward from a reference point;

‘he kicked his legs out’;

Outadverb

away from home;

‘they went out last night’;

Outadverb

from one's possession;

‘he gave out money to the poor’; ‘gave away the tickets’;

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