VS.

Fence vs. Pale

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Fencenoun

A thin artificial barrier that separates two pieces of land or a house perimeter.

Paleadjective

Light in color.

‘I have pale yellow wallpaper.’; ‘She had pale skin because she didn't get much sunlight.’;

Fencenoun

Someone who hides or buys and sells stolen goods, a criminal middleman for transactions of stolen goods.

Paleadjective

(of human skin) Having a pallor (a light color, especially due to sickness, shock, fright etc.).

‘His face turned pale after hearing about his mother's death.’;

Fencenoun

The place whence such a middleman operates.

Paleadjective

Feeble, faint.

‘He is but a pale shadow of his former self.’;

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Fencenoun

Skill in oral debate.

Paleverb

(intransitive) To turn pale; to lose colour.

Fencenoun

The art or practice of fencing.

Paleverb

(intransitive) To become insignificant.

Fencenoun

A guard or guide on machinery.

Paleverb

(transitive) To make pale; to diminish the brightness of.

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Fencenoun

(figuratively) A barrier, for example an emotional barrier.

Paleverb

To enclose with pales, or as if with pales; to encircle or encompass; to fence off.

Fencenoun

A memory barrier.

Palenoun

(obsolete) Paleness; pallor.

Fenceverb

(transitive) To enclose, contain or separate by building fence.

Palenoun

A wooden stake; a picket.

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Fenceverb

(transitive) To defend or guard.

Palenoun

(archaic) Fence made from wooden stake; palisade.

Fenceverb

(transitive) To engage in the selling or buying of stolen goods.

Palenoun

(by extension) Limits, bounds (especially before of).

Fenceverb

To engage in the sport of fencing.

Palenoun

The bounds of morality, good behaviour or judgment in civilized company, in the phrase beyond the pale.

Fenceverb

To jump over a fence.

Palenoun

(heraldry) A vertical band down the middle of a shield.

Fencenoun

That which fends off attack or danger; a defense; a protection; a cover; security; shield.

‘Let us be backed with God and with the seas,Which he hath given for fence impregnable.’; ‘A fence betwixt us and the victor's wrath.’;

Palenoun

(archaic) A territory or defensive area within a specific boundary or under a given jurisdiction.

Fencenoun

An inclosure about a field or other space, or about any object; especially, an inclosing structure of wood, iron, or other material, intended to prevent intrusion from without or straying from within.

‘Leaps o'er the fence with ease into the fold.’;

Palenoun

(historical) The parts of Ireland under English jurisdiction.

Fencenoun

A projection on the bolt, which passes through the tumbler gates in locking and unlocking.

Palenoun

(historical) The territory around Calais under English control (from the 14th to 16th centuries).

Fencenoun

Self-defense by the use of the sword; the art and practice of fencing and sword play; hence, skill in debate and repartee. See Fencing.

‘Enjoy your dear wit, and gay rhetoric,That hath so well been taught her dazzing fence.’; ‘Of dauntless courage and consummate skill in fence.’;

Palenoun

(historical) A portion of Russia in which Jews were permitted to live.

Fencenoun

A receiver of stolen goods, or a place where they are received.

Palenoun

(archaic) The jurisdiction (territorial or otherwise) of an authority.

Fenceverb

To fend off danger from; to give security to; to protect; to guard.

‘To fence my ear against thy sorceries.’;

Palenoun

A cheese scoop.

Fenceverb

To inclose with a fence or other protection; to secure by an inclosure.

‘O thou wall! . . . dive in the earth,And fence not Athens.’; ‘A sheepcote fenced about with olive trees.’;

Palenoun

A shore for bracing a timber before it is fastened.

Fenceverb

To make a defense; to guard one's self of anything, as against an attack; to give protection or security, as by a fence.

‘Vice is the more stubborn as well as the more dangerous evil, and therefore, in the first place, to be fenced against.’;

Paleadjective

Wanting in color; not ruddy; dusky white; pallid; wan; as, a pale face; a pale red; a pale blue.

‘Speechless he stood and pale.’; ‘They are not of complexion red or pale.’;

Fenceverb

To practice the art of attack and defense with the sword or with the foil, esp. with the smallsword, using the point only.

‘He will fence with his own shadow.’;

Paleadjective

Not bright or brilliant; of a faint luster or hue; dim; as, the pale light of the moon.

‘The night, methinks, is but the daylight sick;It looks a little paler.’;

Fenceverb

Hence, to fight or dispute in the manner of fencers, that is, by thrusting, guarding, parrying, etc.

‘They fence and push, and, pushing, loudly roar;Their dewlaps and their sides are bat ed in gore.’; ‘As when a billow, blown against,Falls back, the voice with which I fencedA little ceased, but recommenced.’;

Palenoun

Paleness; pallor.

Fencenoun

a barrier that serves to enclose an area

Palenoun

A pointed stake or slat, either driven into the ground, or fastened to a rail at the top and bottom, for fencing or inclosing; a picket.

‘Deer creep through when a pale tumbles down.’;

Fencenoun

a dealer in stolen property

Palenoun

That which incloses or fences in; a boundary; a limit; a fence; a palisade.

Fenceverb

enclose with a fence;

‘we fenced in our yard’;

Palenoun

A space or field having bounds or limits; a limited region or place; an inclosure; - often used figuratively.

Fenceverb

receive stolen goods

Palenoun

A region within specified bounds, whether or not enclosed or demarcated.

Fenceverb

fight with fencing swords

Palenoun

A stripe or band, as on a garment.

Fenceverb

surround with a wall in order to fortify

Palenoun

One of the greater ordinaries, being a broad perpendicular stripe in an escutcheon, equally distant from the two edges, and occupying one third of it.

Fenceverb

have an argument about something

Palenoun

A cheese scoop.

Fence

A fence is a structure that encloses an area, typically outdoors, and is usually constructed from posts that are connected by boards, wire, rails or netting. A fence differs from a wall in not having a solid foundation along its whole length.Alternatives to fencing include a ditch (sometimes filled with water, forming a moat).

Palenoun

A shore for bracing a timber before it is fastened.

Paleverb

To turn pale; to lose color or luster.

‘Apt to pale at a trodden worm.’;

Paleverb

To make pale; to diminish the brightness of.

‘The glowworm shows the matin to be near,And 'gins to pale his uneffectual fire.’;

Paleverb

To inclose with pales, or as with pales; to encircle; to encompass; to fence off.

‘[Your isle, which stands] ribbed and paled inWith rocks unscalable and roaring waters.’;

Palenoun

a wooden strip forming part of a fence

Paleverb

turn pale, as if in fear

Paleadjective

very light colored; highly diluted with white;

‘pale seagreen’; ‘pale blue eyes’;

Paleadjective

(of light) lacking in intensity or brightness; dim or feeble;

‘the pale light of a half moon’; ‘a pale sun’; ‘the late afternoon light coming through the el tracks fell in pale oblongs on the street’; ‘a pallid sky’; ‘the pale (or wan) stars’; ‘the wan light of dawn’;

Paleadjective

lacking in vitality or interest or effectiveness;

‘a pale rendition of the aria’; ‘pale prose with the faint sweetness of lavender’; ‘a pallid performance’;

Paleadjective

abnormally deficient in color as suggesting physical or emotional distress;

‘the pallid face of the invalid’; ‘her wan face suddenly flushed’;

Paleadjective

not full or rich;

‘high, pale, pure and lovely song’;

Paleadjective

light in colour or shade; containing little colour or pigment

‘choose pale floral patterns for walls’;

Paleadjective

(of a person or their complexion) having less colour than usual, typically as a result of shock, fear, or ill health

‘she looked pale and drawn’;

Paleadjective

(of a light) not strong or bright

‘a pale dawn’;

Paleadjective

inferior or unimpressive

‘the new cheese is a pale imitation of continental cheeses’;

Paleverb

become pale in one's face from shock or fear

‘I paled at the thought of what she might say’;

Paleverb

seem or become less important

‘all else pales by comparison’;

Palenoun

a wooden stake or post used with others to form a fence.

Palenoun

a conceptual boundary

‘bring these things back within the pale of decency’;

Palenoun

an area within determined bounds, or subject to a particular jurisdiction.

Palenoun

another term for English Pale

Palenoun

the areas of Russia to which Jewish residence was formerly restricted.

Palenoun

a broad vertical stripe down the middle of a shield.

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