VS.

Fate vs. Karma

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Fatenoun

The presumed cause, force, principle, or divine will that predetermines events.

Karmanoun

The sum total of a person's actions, which determine the person's next incarnation in samsara, the cycle of death and rebirth.

Fatenoun

The effect, consequence, outcome, or inevitable events predetermined by this cause.

Karmanoun

A force or law of nature which causes one to reap what one sows; destiny; fate.

Fatenoun

Destiny; often with a connotation of death, ruin, misfortune, etc.

‘Accept your fate.’;

Karmanoun

(uncommon) A distinctive feeling, aura, or atmosphere.

Fatenoun

(mythology) lang=en (one of the goddesses said to control the destiny of human beings).

Karmanoun

(internet) A score assigned to a user of a discussion forum, indicating the popularity of their posts with other users.

Fateverb

(transitive) To foreordain or predetermine, to make inevitable.

‘The oracle's prediction fated Oedipus to kill his father; not all his striving could change what would occur.’;

Karmanoun

One's acts considered as fixing one's lot in the future existence.

Fatenoun

A fixed decree by which the order of things is prescribed; the immutable law of the universe; inevitable necessity; the force by which all existence is determined and conditioned.

‘Necessity and chanceApproach not me; and what I will is fate.’; ‘Beyond and above the Olympian gods lay the silent, brooding, everlasting fate of which victim and tyrant were alike the instruments.’;

Karmanoun

The doctrine of fate as the inflexible result of cause and effect, especially the principle by which a person is rewarded or punished in a subsequent incarnation for deeds in the previous incarnation; the theory of inevitable consequence.

Fatenoun

Appointed lot; allotted life; arranged or predetermined event; destiny; especially, the final lot; doom; ruin; death.

‘The great, th'important day, big with the fateOf Cato and of Rome.’; ‘Our wills and fates do so contrary runThat our devices still are overthrown.’; ‘The whizzing arrow sings,And bears thy fate, Antinous, on its wings.’;

Karmanoun

One's destiny; fate.

Fatenoun

The element of chance in the affairs of life; the unforeseen and unestimated conitions considered as a force shaping events; fortune; esp., opposing circumstances against which it is useless to struggle; as, fate was, or the fates were, against him.

‘A brave man struggling in the storms of fate.’; ‘Sometimes an hour of Fate's serenest weather strikes through our changeful sky its coming beams.’;

Karmanoun

The supposed non-physical emanations that a person gives off, which may affect other people; vibrations.

Fatenoun

The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, sometimes called the Destinies, or Parcæwho were supposed to determine the course of human life. They are represented, one as holding the distaff, a second as spinning, and the third as cutting off the thread.

Karmanoun

(Hinduism and Buddhism) the effects of a person's actions that determine his destiny in his next incarnation

Fatenoun

an event (or a course of events) that will inevitably happen in the future

Karmanoun

(in Hinduism and Buddhism) the sum of a person's actions in this and previous states of existence, viewed as deciding their fate in future existences.

Fatenoun

the ultimate agency that predetermines the course of events (often personified as a woman);

‘we are helpless in the face of Destiny’;

Karmanoun

good or bad luck, viewed as resulting from one's actions.

Fatenoun

your overall circumstances or condition in life (including everything that happens to you);

‘whatever my fortune may be’; ‘deserved a better fate’; ‘has a happy lot’; ‘the luck of the Irish’; ‘a victim of circumstances’; ‘success that was her portion’;

Karma

Karma (; Sanskrit: कर्म, IPA: [ˈkɐɽmɐ] (listen); Pali: kamma) means action, work, or deed. The term also refers to the spiritual principle of cause and effect, often descriptively called the principle of karma, wherein intent and actions of an individual (cause) influence the future of that individual (effect): good intent and good deeds contribute to good karma and happier rebirths, while bad intent and bad deeds contribute to bad karma and bad rebirths.The philosophy of karma is closely associated with the idea of rebirth in many schools of Indian religions (particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism), as well as Taoism.

Fateverb

decree or designate beforehand;

‘She was destined to become a great pianist’;

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