VS.

Fast vs. Pace

Published:

Fastadjective

(dated) Firmly or securely fixed in place; stable.

‘That rope is dangerously loose. Make it fast!’;

Pacenoun

(obsolete) Passage, route.

Fastadjective

Firm against attack; fortified by nature or art; impregnable; strong.

Pacenoun

(obsolete) One's journey or route.

Fastadjective

(of people) Steadfast, with unwavering feeling. (Now mostly in set phrases like fast friend(s).)

Pacenoun

(obsolete) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc.

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Fastadjective

Moving with great speed, or capable of doing so; swift, rapid.

‘I am going to buy a fast car.’;

Pacenoun

(obsolete) An aisle in a church.

Fastadjective

Causing unusual rapidity of play or action.

‘a fast racket, or tennis court; a fast track; a fast billiard table; a fast dance floor’;

Pacenoun

Step.

Fastadjective

Able to transfer data in a short period of time.

Pacenoun

A step taken with the foot.

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Fastadjective

Deep or sound (of sleep); fast asleep (of people).

Pacenoun

The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements.

‘Even at the duel, standing 10 paces apart, he could have satisfied Aaron’s honor.’; ‘I have perambulated your field, and estimate its perimeter to be 219 paces.’;

Fastadjective

(of dyes or colours) Not running or fading when subjected to detrimental conditions such as wetness or intense light; permanent.

‘All the washing has come out pink. That red tee-shirt was not fast.’;

Pacenoun

Way of stepping.

Fastadjective

(obsolete) Tenacious; retentive.

Pacenoun

A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet.

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Fastadjective

(dated) Having an extravagant lifestyle or immoral habits.

‘a fast woman’;

Pacenoun

Any of various gaits of a horse, specifically a 2-beat, lateral gait.

Fastadjective

Ahead of the correct time or schedule.

‘There must be something wrong with the hall clock. It is always fast.’;

Pacenoun

Speed or velocity in general.

Fastadjective

(of photographic film) More sensitive to light than average.

Pacenoun

(cricket) A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing.

Fastadverb

In a firm or secure manner, securely; in such a way as not to be moved; safe, sound .

‘Hold this rope as fast as you can.’;

Pacenoun

A group of donkeys. The collective noun for donkeys.

Fastadverb

(of sleeping) Deeply or soundly .

‘He is fast asleep.’;

Pacenoun

Easter.

Fastadverb

Immediately following in place or time; close, very near .

‘The horsemen came fast on our heels.’;

Paceadjective

(cricket) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.

Fastadverb

Quickly, with great speed; within a short time .

‘Do it as fast as you can.’;

Paceverb

Walk to and fro in a small space.

Fastadverb

Ahead of the correct time or schedule.

‘I think my watch is running fast.’;

Paceverb

Set the speed in a race.

Fastnoun

A train that calls at only some stations it passes between its origin and destination, typically just the principal stations

Paceverb

Measure by walking.

Fastnoun

The act or practice of abstaining from food or of eating very little food.

Pacepreposition

(formal) With all due respect to.

Fastnoun

The period of time during which one abstains from or eats very little food.

‘Lent and Ramadan are fasts of two religions.’;

Pacenoun

A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a step.

Fastinterjection

(archery) Short for "stand fast", a warning not to pass between the arrow and the target

Pacenoun

The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; - used as a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty paces.

Fastverb

(intransitive) To restrict one’s personal consumption, generally of food, but sometimes other things, in various manners (totally, temporally, by avoiding particular items), often for religious or medical reasons.

‘Muslims fast during Ramadan and Catholics during Lent.’;

Pacenoun

Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace.

‘To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,Creeps in this petty pace from day to day.’; ‘In the military schools of riding a variety of paces are taught.’;

Fastverb

To abstain from food; to omit to take nourishment in whole or in part; to go hungry.

‘Fasting he went to sleep, and fasting waked.’;

Pacenoun

A slow gait; a footpace.

Fastverb

To practice abstinence as a religious exercise or duty; to abstain from food voluntarily for a time, for the mortification of the body or appetites, or as a token of grief, or humiliation and penitence.

‘Thou didst fast and weep for the child.’;

Pacenoun

Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.

Fastnoun

Abstinence from food; omission to take nourishment.

‘Surfeit is the father of much fast.’;

Pacenoun

Any single movement, step, or procedure.

‘The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is to fall into confidence with Spain.’;

Fastnoun

Voluntary abstinence from food, for a space of time, as a spiritual discipline, or as a token of religious humiliation.

Pacenoun

A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at the upper end of a hall.

Fastnoun

A time of fasting, whether a day, week, or longer time; a period of abstinence from food or certain kinds of food; as, an annual fast.

Pacenoun

A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the warp in pacing the web.

Fastnoun

That which fastens or holds; especially, (Naut.) a mooring rope, hawser, or chain; - called, according to its position, a bow, head, quarter, breast, or stern fast; also, a post on a pier around which hawsers are passed in mooring.

Pacenoun

The rate of progress of any process or activity; as, the students ran at a rapid pace; the plants grew at a remarkable pace.

Fastadjective

Firmly fixed; closely adhering; made firm; not loose, unstable, or easily moved; immovable; as, to make fast the door.

‘There is an order that keeps things fast.’;

Paceverb

To go; to walk; specifically, to move with regular or measured steps.

Fastadjective

Firm against attack; fortified by nature or art; impregnable; strong.

‘Outlaws . . . lurking in woods and fast places.’;

Paceverb

To proceed; to pass on.

‘Or [ere] that I further in this tale pace.’;

Fastadjective

Firm in adherence; steadfast; not easily separated or alienated; faithful; as, a fast friend.

Paceverb

To move quickly by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse; to amble with rapidity; to rack.

Fastadjective

Permanent; not liable to fade by exposure to air or by washing; durable; lasting; as, fast colors.

Paceverb

To pass away; to die.

Fastadjective

Tenacious; retentive.

‘Roses, damask and red, are fast flowers of their smells.’;

Paceverb

To walk over with measured tread; to move slowly over or upon; as, the guard paces his round.

Fastadjective

Not easily disturbed or broken; deep; sound.

‘All this while in a most fast sleep.’;

Paceverb

To measure by steps or paces; as, to pace a piece of ground. Often used with out; as, to pace out the distance.

Fastadjective

Moving rapidly; quick in mition; rapid; swift; as, a fast horse.

Paceverb

To develop, guide, or control the pace or paces of; to teach the pace; to break in.

‘If you can, pace your wisdomIn that good path that I would wish it go.’;

Fastadjective

Given to pleasure seeking; disregardful of restraint; reckless; wild; dissipated; dissolute; as, a fast man; a fast liver.

Pacenoun

the rate of moving (especially walking or running)

Fastadjective

In such a condition, as to resilience, etc., as to make possible unusual rapidity of play or action; as, a fast racket, or tennis court; a fast track; a fast billiard table, etc.

Pacenoun

the distance covered by a step;

‘he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig’;

Fastadverb

In a fast, fixed, or firmly established manner; fixedly; firmly; immovably.

‘We will bind thee fast.’;

Pacenoun

the relative speed of progress or change;

‘he lived at a fast pace’; ‘he works at a great rate’; ‘the pace of events accelerated’;

Fastadverb

In a fast or rapid manner; quickly; swiftly; extravagantly; wildly; as, to run fast; to live fast.

‘He, after Eve seduced, unminded slunkInto the wood fast by.’; ‘Fast by the throne obsequious Fame resides.’;

Pacenoun

a step in walking or running

Fastnoun

abstaining from food

Pacenoun

the rate of some repeating event

Fastverb

abstain from certain foods, as for religious or medical reasons;

‘Catholics sometimes fast during Lent’;

Pacenoun

a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride

Fastverb

abstain from eating;

‘Before the medical exam, you must fast’;

Paceverb

walk with slow or fast paces;

‘He paced up and down the hall’;

Fastadjective

acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly;

‘fast film’; ‘on the fast track in school’; ‘set a fast pace’; ‘a fast car’;

Paceverb

go at a pace;

‘The horse paced’;

Fastadjective

(used of timepieces) indicating a time ahead of or later than the correct time;

‘my watch is fast’;

Paceverb

measure (distances) by pacing;

‘step off ten yards’;

Fastadjective

at a rapid tempo;

‘the band played a fast fox trot’;

Paceverb

regulate or set the pace of;

‘Pace your efforts’;

Fastadjective

(of surfaces) conducive to rapid speeds;

‘a fast road’; ‘grass courts are faster than clay’;

Pacenoun

a single step taken when walking or running

‘Kirov stepped back a pace’;

Fastadjective

firmly fastened or secured against opening;

‘windows and doors were all fast’; ‘a locked closet’; ‘left the house properly secured’;

Pacenoun

a unit of length representing the distance between two successive steps in walking

‘her eyes could size up a lad's wallet at fifty paces’;

Fastadjective

resistant to destruction or fading;

‘fast colors’;

Pacenoun

a gait of a horse or other animal, especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.

Fastadjective

unrestrained by convention or morality;

‘Congreve draws a debauched aristocratic society’; ‘deplorably dissipated and degraded’; ‘riotous living’; ‘fast women’;

Pacenoun

a person's manner of walking or running

‘I steal with quiet pace’;

Fastadjective

hurried and brief;

‘paid a flying visit’; ‘took a flying glance at the book’; ‘a quick inspection’; ‘a fast visit’;

Pacenoun

speed in walking, running, or moving

‘he's an aggressive player with plenty of pace’; ‘the ring road allows traffic to flow at a remarkably fast pace’;

Fastadjective

securely fixed in place;

‘the post was still firm after being hit by the car’;

Pacenoun

the speed or rate at which something happens or develops

‘the story rips along at a cracking pace’; ‘the industrial boom gathered pace’;

Fastadjective

unwavering in devotion to friend or vow or cause;

‘a firm ally’; ‘loyal supporters’; ‘the true-hearted soldier...of Tippecanoe’; ‘fast friends’;

Pacenoun

the state of a wicket as affecting the speed of the ball

‘he can cope with the pace of the Australian wickets’;

Fastadverb

quickly or rapidly (often used as a combining form);

‘how fast can he get here?’; ‘ran as fast as he could’; ‘needs medical help fast’; ‘fast-running rivers’; ‘fast-breaking news’; ‘fast-opening (or fast-closing) shutters’;

Paceverb

walk at a steady speed, especially without a particular destination and as an expression of anxiety or annoyance

‘we paced up and down in exasperation’; ‘she had been pacing the room’;

Fastadverb

firmly or tightly;

‘held fast to the rope’; ‘her foot was stuck fast’; ‘held tight’;

Paceverb

measure (a distance) by walking it and counting the number of steps taken

‘I paced out the dimensions of my new home’;

Paceverb

(of a trained horse) move in a distinctive lateral gait in which both legs on the same side are lifted together

‘he will suddenly pace for a few steps, then go back into normal walk’;

Paceverb

move or develop (something) at a particular rate or speed

‘our fast-paced daily lives’; ‘the action is paced to the beat of a perky march’;

Paceverb

lead (another runner in a race) in order to establish a competitive speed

‘McKenna paced us for four miles’;

Paceverb

do something at a slow and steady rate in order to avoid overexertion

‘Frank was pacing himself for the long night ahead’;

Pacepreposition

with due respect to (someone or their opinion), used to express polite disagreement or contradiction

‘narrative history, pace some theorists, is by no means dead’;

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