VS.

Fast vs. Loose

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Fastadjective

(dated) Firmly or securely fixed in place; stable.

‘That rope is dangerously loose. Make it fast!’;

Looseverb

(transitive) To let loose, to free from restraints.

Fastadjective

Firm against attack; fortified by nature or art; impregnable; strong.

Looseverb

(transitive) To unfasten, to loosen.

Fastadjective

(of people) Steadfast, with unwavering feeling. (Now mostly in set phrases like fast friend(s).)

Looseverb

(transitive) To make less tight, to loosen.

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Fastadjective

Moving with great speed, or capable of doing so; swift, rapid.

‘I am going to buy a fast car.’;

Looseverb

(intransitive) Of a grip or hold, to let go.

Fastadjective

Causing unusual rapidity of play or action.

‘a fast racket, or tennis court; a fast track; a fast billiard table; a fast dance floor’;

Looseverb

(archery) to shoot (an arrow)

Fastadjective

Able to transfer data in a short period of time.

Looseverb

(obsolete) To set sail.

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Fastadjective

Deep or sound (of sleep); fast asleep (of people).

Looseverb

(obsolete) To solve; to interpret.

Fastadjective

(of dyes or colours) Not running or fading when subjected to detrimental conditions such as wetness or intense light; permanent.

‘All the washing has come out pink. That red tee-shirt was not fast.’;

Looseadjective

Not fixed in place tightly or firmly.

‘This wheelbarrow has a loose wheel.’;

Fastadjective

(obsolete) Tenacious; retentive.

Looseadjective

Not held or packaged together.

‘You can buy apples in a pack, but they are cheaper loose.’;

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Fastadjective

(dated) Having an extravagant lifestyle or immoral habits.

‘a fast woman’;

Looseadjective

Not under control.

‘The dog is loose again.’;

Fastadjective

Ahead of the correct time or schedule.

‘There must be something wrong with the hall clock. It is always fast.’;

Looseadjective

Not fitting closely

‘I wear loose clothes when it is hot.’;

Fastadjective

(of photographic film) More sensitive to light than average.

Looseadjective

Not compact.

‘It is difficult walking on loose gravel.’; ‘a cloth of loose texture’;

Fastadverb

In a firm or secure manner, securely; in such a way as not to be moved; safe, sound .

‘Hold this rope as fast as you can.’;

Looseadjective

Relaxed.

‘She danced with a loose flowing movement.’;

Fastadverb

(of sleeping) Deeply or soundly .

‘He is fast asleep.’;

Looseadjective

Not precise or exact; vague; indeterminate.

‘a loose way of reasoning’;

Fastadverb

Immediately following in place or time; close, very near .

‘The horsemen came fast on our heels.’;

Looseadjective

Indiscreet.

‘Loose talk costs lives.’;

Fastadverb

Quickly, with great speed; within a short time .

‘Do it as fast as you can.’;

Looseadjective

(dated) Free from moral restraint; immoral, unchaste.

Fastadverb

Ahead of the correct time or schedule.

‘I think my watch is running fast.’;

Looseadjective

Not being in the possession of any competing team during a game.

‘He caught an elbow going after a loose ball.’; ‘The puck was momentarily loose right in front of the net.’;

Fastnoun

A train that calls at only some stations it passes between its origin and destination, typically just the principal stations

Looseadjective

(dated) Not costive; having lax bowels.

Fastnoun

The act or practice of abstaining from food or of eating very little food.

Loosenoun

(archery) The release of an arrow.

Fastnoun

The period of time during which one abstains from or eats very little food.

‘Lent and Ramadan are fasts of two religions.’;

Loosenoun

(obsolete) A state of laxity or indulgence; unrestrained freedom, abandonment.

Fastinterjection

(archery) Short for "stand fast", a warning not to pass between the arrow and the target

Loosenoun

(rugby) All play other than set pieces (scrums and line-outs).

Fastverb

(intransitive) To restrict one’s personal consumption, generally of food, but sometimes other things, in various manners (totally, temporally, by avoiding particular items), often for religious or medical reasons.

‘Muslims fast during Ramadan and Catholics during Lent.’;

Loosenoun

Freedom from restraint.

Fastverb

To abstain from food; to omit to take nourishment in whole or in part; to go hungry.

‘Fasting he went to sleep, and fasting waked.’;

Loosenoun

A letting go; discharge.

Fastverb

To practice abstinence as a religious exercise or duty; to abstain from food voluntarily for a time, for the mortification of the body or appetites, or as a token of grief, or humiliation and penitence.

‘Thou didst fast and weep for the child.’;

Looseinterjection

(archery) begin shooting; release your arrows

Fastnoun

Abstinence from food; omission to take nourishment.

‘Surfeit is the father of much fast.’;

Looseadjective

Unbound; untied; unsewed; not attached, fastened, fixed, or confined; as, the loose sheets of a book.

‘Her hair, nor loose, nor tied in formal plat.’;

Fastnoun

Voluntary abstinence from food, for a space of time, as a spiritual discipline, or as a token of religious humiliation.

Looseadjective

Free from constraint or obligation; not bound by duty, habit, etc.; - with from or of.

‘Now I standLoose of my vow; but who knows Cato's thoughts ?’;

Fastnoun

A time of fasting, whether a day, week, or longer time; a period of abstinence from food or certain kinds of food; as, an annual fast.

Looseadjective

Not tight or close; as, a loose garment.

Fastnoun

That which fastens or holds; especially, (Naut.) a mooring rope, hawser, or chain; - called, according to its position, a bow, head, quarter, breast, or stern fast; also, a post on a pier around which hawsers are passed in mooring.

Looseadjective

Not dense, close, compact, or crowded; as, a cloth of loose texture.

‘With horse and chariots ranked in loose array.’;

Fastadjective

Firmly fixed; closely adhering; made firm; not loose, unstable, or easily moved; immovable; as, to make fast the door.

‘There is an order that keeps things fast.’;

Looseadjective

Not precise or exact; vague; indeterminate; as, a loose style, or way of reasoning.

‘The comparison employed . . . must be considered rather as a loose analogy than as an exact scientific explanation.’;

Fastadjective

Firm against attack; fortified by nature or art; impregnable; strong.

‘Outlaws . . . lurking in woods and fast places.’;

Looseadjective

Not strict in matters of morality; not rigid according to some standard of right.

‘The loose morality which he had learned.’;

Fastadjective

Firm in adherence; steadfast; not easily separated or alienated; faithful; as, a fast friend.

Looseadjective

Unconnected; rambling.

‘Vario spends whole mornings in running over loose and unconnected pages.’;

Fastadjective

Permanent; not liable to fade by exposure to air or by washing; durable; lasting; as, fast colors.

Looseadjective

Lax; not costive; having lax bowels.

Fastadjective

Tenacious; retentive.

‘Roses, damask and red, are fast flowers of their smells.’;

Looseadjective

Dissolute; unchaste; as, a loose man or woman.

‘Loose ladies in delight.’;

Fastadjective

Not easily disturbed or broken; deep; sound.

‘All this while in a most fast sleep.’;

Looseadjective

Containing or consisting of obscene or unchaste language; as, a loose epistle.

Fastadjective

Moving rapidly; quick in mition; rapid; swift; as, a fast horse.

Loosenoun

Freedom from restraint.

Fastadjective

Given to pleasure seeking; disregardful of restraint; reckless; wild; dissipated; dissolute; as, a fast man; a fast liver.

Loosenoun

A letting go; discharge.

‘Vent all its griefs, and give a loose to sorrow.’;

Fastadjective

In such a condition, as to resilience, etc., as to make possible unusual rapidity of play or action; as, a fast racket, or tennis court; a fast track; a fast billiard table, etc.

Loose

To untie or unbind; to free from any fastening; to remove the shackles or fastenings of; to set free; to relieve.

‘Canst thou . . . loose the bands of Orion ?’; ‘Ye shall find an ass tied, and a colt with her; loose them, and bring them unto me.’;

Fastadverb

In a fast, fixed, or firmly established manner; fixedly; firmly; immovably.

‘We will bind thee fast.’;

Loose

To release from anything obligatory or burdensome; to disengage; hence, to absolve; to remit.

‘Art thou loosed from a wife ? seek not a wife.’; ‘Whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.’;

Fastadverb

In a fast or rapid manner; quickly; swiftly; extravagantly; wildly; as, to run fast; to live fast.

‘He, after Eve seduced, unminded slunkInto the wood fast by.’; ‘Fast by the throne obsequious Fame resides.’;

Loose

To relax; to loosen; to make less strict.

‘The joints of his loins were loosed.’;

Fastnoun

abstaining from food

Loose

To solve; to interpret.

Fastverb

abstain from certain foods, as for religious or medical reasons;

‘Catholics sometimes fast during Lent’;

Looseverb

To set sail.

Fastverb

abstain from eating;

‘Before the medical exam, you must fast’;

Looseverb

grant freedom to; free from confinement

Fastadjective

acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly;

‘fast film’; ‘on the fast track in school’; ‘set a fast pace’; ‘a fast car’;

Looseverb

turn loose or free from restraint;

‘let loose mines’; ‘Loose terrible plagues upon humanity’;

Fastadjective

(used of timepieces) indicating a time ahead of or later than the correct time;

‘my watch is fast’;

Looseverb

make loose or looser;

‘loosen the tension on a rope’;

Fastadjective

at a rapid tempo;

‘the band played a fast fox trot’;

Looseverb

become loose or looser or less tight;

‘The noose loosened’; ‘the rope relaxed’;

Fastadjective

(of surfaces) conducive to rapid speeds;

‘a fast road’; ‘grass courts are faster than clay’;

Looseadjective

not restrained or confined or attached;

‘a pocket full of loose bills’; ‘knocked the ball loose’; ‘got loose from his attacker’;

Fastadjective

firmly fastened or secured against opening;

‘windows and doors were all fast’; ‘a locked closet’; ‘left the house properly secured’;

Looseadjective

not compact or dense in structure or arrangement;

‘loose gravel’;

Fastadjective

resistant to destruction or fading;

‘fast colors’;

Looseadjective

(of a ball in sport) not in the possession or control of any player;

‘a loose ball’;

Fastadjective

unrestrained by convention or morality;

‘Congreve draws a debauched aristocratic society’; ‘deplorably dissipated and degraded’; ‘riotous living’; ‘fast women’;

Looseadjective

not tight; not closely constrained or constricted or constricting;

‘loose clothing’; ‘the large shoes were very loose’;

Fastadjective

hurried and brief;

‘paid a flying visit’; ‘took a flying glance at the book’; ‘a quick inspection’; ‘a fast visit’;

Looseadjective

not officially recognized or controlled;

‘an informal agreement’; ‘a loose organization of the local farmers’;

Fastadjective

securely fixed in place;

‘the post was still firm after being hit by the car’;

Looseadjective

not literal;

‘a loose interpretation of what she had been told’; ‘a free translation of the poem’;

Fastadjective

unwavering in devotion to friend or vow or cause;

‘a firm ally’; ‘loyal supporters’; ‘the true-hearted soldier...of Tippecanoe’; ‘fast friends’;

Looseadjective

emptying easily or excessively;

‘loose bowels’;

Fastadverb

quickly or rapidly (often used as a combining form);

‘how fast can he get here?’; ‘ran as fast as he could’; ‘needs medical help fast’; ‘fast-running rivers’; ‘fast-breaking news’; ‘fast-opening (or fast-closing) shutters’;

Looseadjective

not affixed;

‘the stamp came loose’;

Fastadverb

firmly or tightly;

‘held fast to the rope’; ‘her foot was stuck fast’; ‘held tight’;

Looseadjective

not tense or taut;

‘the old man's skin hung loose and gray’; ‘slack and wrinkled skin’; ‘slack sails’; ‘a slack rope’;

Looseadjective

(of textures) full of small openings or gaps;

‘an open texture’; ‘a loose weave’;

Looseadjective

not fixed firmly or tightly;

‘the bolts became loose over time’; ‘a loose chair leg’; ‘loose bricks’;

Looseadjective

lacking a sense of restraint or responsibility;

‘idle talk’; ‘a loose tongue’;

Looseadjective

not carefully arranged in a package;

‘a box of loose nails’;

Looseadjective

freely producing mucus;

‘a loose phlegmy cough’;

Looseadjective

having escaped, especially from confinement;

‘a convict still at large’; ‘searching for two escaped prisoners’; ‘dogs loose on the streets’; ‘criminals on the loose in the neighborhood’;

Looseadjective

casual and unrestrained in sexual behavior;

‘her easy virtue’; ‘he was told to avoid loose (or light) women’; ‘wanton behavior’;

Looseadjective

not bound or fastened or gathered together;

‘loose pages’; ‘loose papers’;

Looseadverb

without restraint;

‘cows in India are running loose’;

Looseadjective

not firmly or tightly fixed in place; detached or able to be detached

‘the lorry's trailer came loose’; ‘a loose tooth’;

Looseadjective

not held or tied together or contained within something

‘pockets bulging with loose change’; ‘wear your hair loose’;

Looseadjective

(of a person or animal) not tied up or shut in

‘the tethered horses broke loose’; ‘the bull was loose with cattle in the field’;

Looseadjective

(of faeces) containing excessive liquid

‘loose bowel movements’;

Looseadjective

(of the ball or puck in a game) in play but not in any player's possession.

Looseadjective

(of a garment) not fitting tightly or closely

‘she slipped into a loose T-shirt’;

Looseadjective

not close, compact, or solid in structure or formation

‘loose soil’; ‘the fabric's loose weave’;

Looseadjective

not rigidly organized

‘a loose federation of political groups’;

Looseadjective

relaxed; physically slack

‘she swung into her easy, loose stride’;

Looseadjective

(of play, especially in rugby) with the players not close together.

Looseadjective

not strict or exact

‘a loose interpretation’;

Looseadjective

careless and indiscreet in what is said

‘there is too much loose talk about the situation’;

Looseadjective

(of play in cricket) inaccurate or careless

‘Lucas punished some loose bowling severely’;

Looseadjective

engaging in casual sexual encounters or relationships

‘she ran the risk of being called a loose woman’;

Loosenoun

loose play

‘he was in powerful form in the loose’;

Looseverb

set free; release

‘the hounds have been loosed’;

Looseverb

make (something) loose; untie or undo

‘the ropes were loosed’;

Looseverb

relax (one's grip)

‘he loosed his grip suddenly’;

Looseverb

fire (a bullet, arrow, etc.)

‘he loosed off a shot at the vehicle’;

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