VS.

Fancy vs. Plain

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  • Fancy (noun)

    The imagination.

  • Fancy (noun)

    An image or representation of anything formed in the mind.

    "conception|thought|idea"

  • Fancy (noun)

    An opinion or notion formed without much reflection.

    "impression"

  • Fancy (noun)

    A whim.

    "Thesaurus:whim"

    "I had a fancy to learn to play the flute."

  • Fancy (noun)

    Love or amorous attachment.

    "Thesaurus:predilection"

    "He took a fancy to her."

  • Fancy (noun)

    The object of inclination or liking.

  • Fancy (noun)

    Any sport or hobby pursued by a group.

    "hobby|Thesaurus:hobby"

    "Trainspotting is the fancy of a special lot."

    "the cat fancy"

  • Fancy (noun)

    The enthusiasts of such a pursuit.

    "Thesaurus:fan"

    "He fell out of favor with the boxing fancy after the incident."

  • Fancy (noun)

    A diamond with a distinctive colour.

  • Fancy (noun)

    That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value.

  • Fancy (noun)

    A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad.

  • Fancy (noun)

    In the game of jacks, a style of play involving additional actions (contrasted with plainsies).

  • Fancy (adjective)

    Decorative.

    "decorative|ornate"

    "plain|simple"

    "This is a fancy shawl."

  • Fancy (adjective)

    Of a superior grade.

    "high-end"

    "This box contains bottles of the fancy grade of jelly."

  • Fancy (adjective)

    Executed with skill.

    "He initiated the game winning play with a fancy, deked saucer pass to the winger."

  • Fancy (adjective)

    Unnecessarily complicated.

    "highfalutin"

    "simple"

    "I'm not keen on him and his fancy ideas."

  • Fancy (adjective)

    Extravagant; above real value.

  • Fancy (adverb)

    In a fancy manner; fancily.

  • Fancy (verb)

    To appreciate without jealousy or greed.

    "I fancy your new car, but I like my old one just fine."

  • Fancy (verb)

    would like

    "feel like"

    "I fancy a burger tonight for dinner."

    "Do you fancy going to town this weekend?"

  • Fancy (verb)

    To be sexually attracted to.

    "like|q1=US"

    "I fancy that girl over there."

  • Fancy (verb)

    To imagine, suppose.

    "I fancy you'll want something to drink after your long journey."

    "Fancy meeting you here!"

    "Fancy that! I saw Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy kissing in the garden."

  • Fancy (verb)

    To form a conception of; to portray in the mind.

    "imagine"

  • Fancy (verb)

    To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners.

  • Fancy (verb)

    To breed (animals) as a hobby.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Flat, level. from 14th c.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Simple.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Ordinary; lacking adornment or ornamentation; unembellished. from 14th c.

    "He was dressed simply in plain black clothes."

    "a plain tune"

  • Plain (adjective)

    Of just one colour; lacking a pattern.

    "a plain pink polycotton skirt"

  • Plain (adjective)

    Simple in habits or qualities; unsophisticated, not exceptional, ordinary. from 16th c.

    "They're just plain people like you or me."

  • Plain (adjective)

    Having only few ingredients, or no additional ingredients or seasonings; not elaborate, without toppings or extras. from 17th c.

    "Would you like a poppy bagel or a plain bagel?"

  • Plain (adjective)

    Obvious.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Containing no extended or nonprinting characters (especially in plain text). from 20th c.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Evident to one's senses or reason; manifest, clear, unmistakable. from 14th c.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Open.

  • Plain (adjective)

    Downright; total, unmistakable (as intensifier). from 14th c.

    "His answer was just plain nonsense."

  • Plain (adjective)

    Honest and without deception; candid, open; blunt. from 14th c.

    "Let me be plain with you: I don't like her."

  • Plain (adjective)

    Not unusually beautiful; unattractive. from 17th c.

    "Throughout high school she worried that she had a rather plain face."

  • Plain (adverb)

    Simply

    "It was just plain stupid."

    "I plain forgot."

  • Plain (noun)

    A lamentation.

  • Plain (noun)

    An expanse of land with relatively low relief.

  • Plain (noun)

    A battlefield.

  • Plain (noun)

    A plane.

  • Plain (verb)

    To complain. 13th-19th c.

  • Plain (verb)

    To lament, bewail. from 14th c.

    "to plain a loss"

  • Plain (verb)

    To level; to raze; to make plain or even on the surface.

  • Plain (verb)

    To make plain or manifest; to explain.

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