VS.

Fancy vs. Ornate

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Fancynoun

The imagination.

Ornateadjective

Elaborately ornamented, often to excess.

Fancynoun

An image or representation of anything formed in the mind.

Ornateadjective

Flashy, flowery or showy

Fancynoun

An opinion or notion formed without much reflection.

Ornateadjective

Finely finished, as a style of composition.

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Fancynoun

A whim.

‘I had a fancy to learn to play the flute.’;

Ornateverb

(obsolete) To adorn; to honour.

Fancynoun

Love or amorous attachment.

‘He took a fancy to her.’;

Ornateadjective

Elaborately adorned or decorated; beautifully sumptuous.

Fancynoun

The object of inclination or liking.

Ornateadjective

Finely finished, as a style of composition.

‘A graceful and ornate rhetoric.’;

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Fancynoun

Any sport or hobby pursued by a group.

‘Trainspotting is the fancy of a special lot.’; ‘the cat fancy’;

Ornateverb

To adorn; to honor.

‘They may ornate and sanctify the name of God.’;

Fancynoun

The enthusiasts of such a pursuit.

‘He fell out of favor with the boxing fancy after the incident.’;

Ornateadjective

rich in decorative detail

Fancynoun

A diamond with a distinctive colour.

Ornateadjective

marked by elaborate rhetoric and elaborated with decorative details;

‘a flowery speech’; ‘ornate rhetoric taught out of the rule of Plato’;

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Fancynoun

That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value.

Fancynoun

(obsolete) A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad.

Fancynoun

In the game of jacks, a style of play involving additional actions (contrasted with plainsies).

Fancyadjective

Decorative.

‘This is a fancy shawl.’;

Fancyadjective

Of a superior grade.

‘This box contains bottles of the fancy grade of jelly.’;

Fancyadjective

Executed with skill.

‘He initiated the game winning play with a fancy, deked saucer pass to the winger.’;

Fancyadjective

(colloquial) Unnecessarily complicated.

‘I'm not keen on him and his fancy ideas.’;

Fancyadjective

(obsolete) Extravagant; above real value.

Fancyadverb

(nonstandard) In a fancy manner; fancily.

Fancyverb

(formal) To appreciate without jealousy or greed.

‘I fancy your new car, but I like my old one just fine.’;

Fancyverb

(British) would like

‘I fancy a burger tonight for dinner.’; ‘Do you fancy going to town this weekend?’;

Fancyverb

To be sexually attracted to.

‘I fancy that girl over there.’;

Fancyverb

(dated) To imagine, suppose.

‘I fancy you'll want something to drink after your long journey.’; ‘Fancy meeting you here!’; ‘Fancy that! I saw Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy kissing in the garden.’;

Fancyverb

To form a conception of; to portray in the mind.

Fancyverb

To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners.

Fancyverb

(transitive) To breed (animals) as a hobby.

Fancynoun

The faculty by which the mind forms an image or a representation of anything perceived before; the power of combining and modifying such objects into new pictures or images; the power of readily and happily creating and recalling such objects for the purpose of amusement, wit, or embellishment; imagination.

‘In the soulAre many lesser faculties, that serveReason as chief. Among these fancy nextHer office holds.’;

Fancynoun

An image or representation of anything formed in the mind; conception; thought; idea; conceit.

‘How now, my lord ! why do you keep alone,Of sorriest fancies your companoins making ?’;

Fancynoun

An opinion or notion formed without much reflection; caprice; whim; impression.

‘I have always had a fancy that learning might be made a play and recreation to children.’;

Fancynoun

Inclination; liking, formed by caprice rather than reason; as, to strike one's fancy; hence, the object of inclination or liking.

‘To fit your fancies to your father's will.’;

Fancynoun

That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value.

‘London pride is a pretty fancy for borders.’;

Fancynoun

A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad.

‘At a great book sale in London, which had congregated all the fancy.’;

Fancyverb

To figure to one's self; to believe or imagine something without proof.

‘If our search has reached no farther than simile and metaphor, we rather fancy than know.’;

Fancyverb

To love.

Fancyverb

To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine.

‘He whom I fancy, but can ne'er express.’;

Fancyverb

To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners.

Fancyverb

To believe without sufficient evidence; to imagine (something which is unreal).

‘He fancied he was welcome, because those arounde him were his kinsmen.’;

Fancyadjective

Adapted to please the fancy or taste, especially when of high quality or unusually appealing; ornamental; as, fancy goods; fancy clothes.

Fancyadjective

Extravagant; above real value.

‘This anxiety never degenerated into a monomania, like that which led his [Frederick the Great's] father to pay fancy prices for giants.’;

Fancynoun

something many people believe that is false;

‘they have the illusion that I am very wealthy’;

Fancynoun

fancy was held by Coleridge to be more casual and superficial than imagination

Fancynoun

a predisposition to like something;

‘he had a fondness for whiskey’;

Fancyverb

imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind;

‘I can't see him on horseback!’; ‘I can see what will happen’; ‘I can see a risk in this strategy’;

Fancyverb

have a fancy or particular liking or desire for;

‘She fancied a necklace that she had seen in the jeweler's window’;

Fancyadjective

not plain; decorative or ornamented;

‘fancy handwriting’; ‘fancy clothes’;

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