VS.

Extravagant vs. Gaudy

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Extravagantadjective

Exceeding the bounds of something; roving; hence, foreign.

Gaudyadjective

very showy or ornamented, now especially when excessive, or in a tasteless or vulgar manner

Extravagantadjective

Extreme; wild; excessive; unrestrained.

‘extravagant acts, praise, or abuse’;

Gaudyadjective

(obsolete) gay; merry; festive

Extravagantadjective

Exorbitant.

Gaudynoun

One of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited.

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Extravagantadjective

Profuse in expenditure; prodigal; wasteful.

‘an extravagant man;’; ‘extravagant expense’;

Gaudynoun

A reunion held by one of the colleges of the University of Oxford for alumni, normally held during the summer vacations.

Extravagantadjective

Wandering beyond one's bounds; roving; hence, foreign.

‘The extravagant and erring spirit hiesTo his confine.’;

Gaudyadjective

Ostentatiously fine; showy; gay, but tawdry or meretricious.

‘Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy.’;

Extravagantadjective

Exceeding due bounds; wild; excessive; unrestrained; as, extravagant acts, wishes, praise, abuse.

‘There appears something nobly wild and extravagant in great natural geniuses.’;

Gaudyadjective

Gay; merry; festal.

‘Let's have one other gaudy night.’;

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Extravagantadjective

Profuse in expenditure; prodigal; wasteful; as, an extravagant man.

Gaudynoun

One of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited.

Extravagantnoun

One who is confined to no general rule.

Gaudynoun

A feast or festival; - called also gaud-day and gaudy day.

Extravagantnoun

Certain constitutions or decretal epistles, not at first included with others, but subsequently made a part of the canon law.

Gaudynoun

a celebratory feast held annually at one of the colleges in a British university

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Extravagantadjective

unrestrained in especially feelings;

‘extravagant praise’; ‘exuberant compliments’; ‘overweening ambition’; ‘overweening greed’;

Gaudyadjective

tastelessly showy;

‘a flash car’; ‘a flashy ring’; ‘garish colors’; ‘a gaudy costume’; ‘loud sport shirts’; ‘a meretricious yet stylish book’; ‘tawdry ornaments’;

Extravagantadjective

recklessly wasteful;

‘prodigal in their expenditures’;

Gaudyadjective

(used especially of clothes) marked by conspicuous display

Extravagantadjective

lacking restraint in spending money or using resources

‘it was rather extravagant to buy both’;

Gaudyadjective

extravagantly bright or showy, typically so as to be tasteless

‘silver bows and gaudy ribbons’;

Extravagantadjective

resulting from or showing a lack of restraint in spending money or resources

‘extravagant gifts like computer games’;

Gaudynoun

a celebratory dinner or entertainment held by a college for old members

‘administratively, the college cannot cope with more than one gaudy per year’;

Extravagantadjective

exceeding what is reasonable or appropriate; excessive or elaborate

‘extravagant claims about the merchandise’;

Gaudy

Gaudy or gaudie (from the Latin, , meaning or ) is a term used to reflect student life in a number of the ancient universities in the United Kingdom as well as other institutions such as Durham University and Reading University. It is generally believed to relate to the traditional student song, (On the Shortness of Life), which is commonly known as the Gaudeamus (Let's make merry) by virtue of its first word.

‘gaudium’; ‘enjoyment’; ‘merry-making’; ‘De Brevitate Vitae’;

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