VS.

Expect vs. Except

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Expectverb

To look for (mentally); to look forward to, as to something that is believed to be about to happen or come; to have a previous apprehension of, whether of good or evil; to look for with some confidence; to anticipate; -- often followed by an infinitive, sometimes by a clause (with, or without, that).

‘I expect to receive wages.’; ‘I expect that the troops will be defeated.’;

Exceptverb

(transitive) To exclude; to specify as being an exception.

Expectverb

To consider obligatory or required.

Exceptverb

(intransitive) To take exception, to object (to or against).

‘to except to a witness or his testimony’;

Expectverb

To consider reasonably due.

‘You are expected to get the task done by the end of next week.’;

Exceptpreposition

With the exception of; but.

‘There was nothing in the cupboard except a tin of beans.’;

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Expectverb

(continuous aspect only, of a woman or couple) To be pregnant, to consider a baby due.

Exceptconjunction

With the exception (that); used to introduce a clause, phrase or adverb forming an exception or qualification to something previously stated.

‘You look a bit like my sister, except she has longer hair.’; ‘I never made fun of her except teasingly.’;

Expectverb

To wait for; to await.

Exceptconjunction

(archaic) Unless; used to introduce a hypothetical case in which an exception may exist.

Expectverb

To wait; to stay.

Exceptverb

To take or leave out (anything) from a number or a whole as not belonging to it; to exclude; to omit.

‘Who never touchedThe excepted tree.’; ‘Wherein (if we only except the unfitness of the judge) all other things concurred.’;

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Expectverb

To wait for; to await.

‘Let's in, and there expect their coming.’;

Exceptverb

To object to; to protest against.

Expectverb

To look for (mentally); to look forward to, as to something that is believed to be about to happen or come; to have a previous apprehension of, whether of good or evil; to look for with some confidence; to anticipate; - often followed by an infinitive, sometimes by a clause (with, or without, that); as, I expect to receive wages; I expect that the troops will be defeated.

‘The Somersetshire or yellow regiment . . . was expected to arrive on the following day.’;

Exceptverb

To take exception; to object; - usually followed by to, sometimes by against; as, to except to a witness or his testimony.

‘Except thou wilt except against my love.’;

Expectverb

To wait; to stay.

Exceptpreposition

With exclusion of; leaving or left out; excepting.

‘God and his Son except,Created thing naught valued he nor . . . shunned.’;

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Expectnoun

Expectation.

Exceptconjunction

Unless; if it be not so that.

‘And he said, I will not let thee go, except thou bless me.’; ‘But yesterday you never opened lip,Except, indeed, to drink.’;

Expectverb

regard something as probable or likely;

‘The meteorologists are expecting rain for tomorrow’;

Exceptverb

take exception to;

‘he demurred at my suggestion to work on Saturday’;

Expectverb

consider obligatory; request and expect;

‘We require our secretary to be on time’; ‘Aren't we asking too much of these children?’; ‘I expect my students to arrive in time for their lessons’;

Exceptverb

prevent from being included or considered or accepted;

‘The bad results were excluded from the report’; ‘Leave off the top piece’;

Expectverb

look forward to the probable occurrence of;

‘We were expecting a visit from our relatives’; ‘She is looking to a promotion’; ‘he is waiting to be drafted’;

Exceptpreposition

not including; other than

‘they work every day except Sunday’; ‘I was naked except for my socks’;

Expectverb

consider reasonable or due;

‘I'm expecting a full explanation as to why these files were destroyed’;

Exceptconjunction

used before a statement that forms an exception to one just made

‘I didn't tell him anything, except that I needed the money’; ‘our berets were the same except mine was blue’;

Expectverb

be pregnant with;

‘She is bearing his child’; ‘The are expecting another child in January’; ‘I am carrying his child’;

Exceptconjunction

unless

‘she never offered advice, except it were asked of her’;

Expectverb

look forward to the birth of a child;

‘She is expecting in March’;

Exceptverb

specify as excluded from a category or group

‘five classes of advertisement are excepted from control’;

Expectverb

regard (something) as likely to happen

‘one might expect that Hollywood would adjust its approach’; ‘it's as well to expect the worst’; ‘the hearing is expected to last a week’;

Expectverb

regard (someone) as likely to do or be something

‘they were not expecting him to continue’;

Expectverb

believe that (someone or something) will arrive soon

‘Celia was expecting a visitor’;

Expectverb

require (something) as rightfully due or appropriate in the circumstances

‘we expect great things of you’;

Expectverb

require (someone) to fulfil an obligation

‘we expect employers to pay a reasonable salary’;

Expectverb

used to indicate that one supposes something to be so but has no firm evidence

‘they're just friends of his, I expect’; ‘I expect you know them?’;

Expect

Expect is an extension to the Tcl scripting language written by Don Libes. The program automates interactions with programs that expose a text terminal interface.

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