VS.

Exculpate vs. Acquit

Published:

Exculpateverb

To clear of or to free from guilt; exonerate.

Acquitverb

(transitive) To declare or find innocent or not guilty.

Exculpateverb

To clear from alleged fault or guilt; to prove to be guiltless; to relieve of blame; to acquit.

‘He exculpated himself from being the author of the heroic epistle.’; ‘I exculpate him further for his writing against me.’;

Acquitverb

(transitive) To discharge (for example, a claim or debt); to clear off, to pay off; to fulfil.

Exculpateverb

pronounce not guilty of criminal charges;

‘The suspect was cleared of the murder charges’;

Acquitverb

(transitive) Followed by of (and formerly by from): to discharge, release, or set free from a burden, duty, liability, or obligation, or from an accusation or charge.

‘The jury acquitted the prisoner of the charge.’;

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Exculpateverb

show or declare that (someone) is not guilty of wrongdoing

‘the article exculpated the mayor’;

Acquitverb

(reflexive) To bear or conduct oneself; to perform one's part.

‘The soldier acquitted herself well in battle.’; ‘The orator acquitted himself very poorly.’;

Acquitverb

(reflexive) To clear oneself.

Acquitverb

past participle of acquit.

Acquitverb

To release, to rescue, to set free.

Acquitverb

To pay for; to atone for.

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Acquit

Acquitted; set free; rid of.

Acquitverb

To discharge, as a claim or debt; to clear off; to pay off; to requite.

‘A responsibility that can never be absolutely acquitted.’;

Acquitverb

To pay for; to atone for.

Acquitverb

To set free, release or discharge from an obligation, duty, liability, burden, or from an accusation or charge; - now followed by of before the charge, formerly by from; as, the jury acquitted the prisoner; we acquit a man of evil intentions.

Acquitverb

To clear one's self.

Acquitverb

pronounce not guilty of criminal charges;

‘The suspect was cleared of the murder charges’;

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Acquitverb

behave in a certain manner;

‘She carried herself well’; ‘he bore himself with dignity’; ‘They conducted themselves well during these difficult times’;

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