VS.

Epitrachelion vs. Maniple

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Epitrachelionnoun

(Eastern Orthodoxy) The liturgical vestment worn by priests and bishops of the Eastern Orthodox Church as the symbol of their priesthood, corresponding to the Western stole.

Maniplenoun

A division of the Roman army numbering 120 (or sometimes 60) soldiers exclusive of officers; any small body of soldiers.

Epitrachelion

The epitrachelion (Greek: ἐπιτραχήλιον Slavic: епитрахиль, epitrachil; often called simply a stole in casual English-language usage) is the liturgical vestment worn by priests and bishops of the Orthodox Church and Eastern Catholic Churches as the symbol of their priesthood, corresponding to the Western stole. It is essentially the orarion adapted for priests and bishops, worn around the neck with two ends of equal length hanging down in front of the clergyman's body (more or less to the ankle) and with the two adjacent sides sewn or buttoned together up the center, leaving enough space through which to place the head.

‘around the neck’;

Maniplenoun

In Western Christianity, an ornamental band or scarf worn upon the left arm as a part of the vestments of a priest in the Roman Catholic Church, and sometimes the Church of England.

Maniplenoun

A hand; a fist.

Maniplenoun

(obsolete) A handful.

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Maniplenoun

A handful.

Maniplenoun

A division of the Roman army numbering sixty men exclusive of officers; any small body of soldiers; a company.

Maniplenoun

Originally, a napkin; later, an ornamental band or scarf worn upon the left arm as a part of the vestments of a priest in the Roman Catholic Church. It is sometimes worn in the English Church service.

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