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Engorge vs. Gorge — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Engorge and Gorge

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Definitions

Engorge

To devour greedily.

Gorge

A narrow valley between hills or mountains, typically with steep rocky walls and a stream running through it.

Engorge

To gorge; glut.

Gorge

The throat.

Engorge

To fill to excess, as with blood or other fluid.

Gorge

A narrow rear entrance to a bastion, outwork, or other fortification.
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Engorge

To feed ravenously.

Gorge

A mass of ice obstructing a narrow passage, especially a river.

Engorge

(transitive) To devour something greedily, gorge, glut.

Gorge

Eat a large amount greedily; fill oneself with food
They gorged themselves on Cornish cream teas

Engorge

(intransitive) To feed ravenously.

Gorge

A deep narrow valley with steep rocky sides; a ravine.
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Engorge

(pathology) To fill excessively with a body liquid, especially blood.

Gorge

A narrow entrance into the outwork of a fortification.

Engorge

To gorge; to glut.

Gorge

The throat; the gullet
The gory sight made my gorge rise.

Engorge

To swallow with greediness or in large quantities; to devour.

Gorge

The crop of a hawk.

Engorge

To feed with eagerness or voracity; to stuff one's self with food.

Gorge

An instance of gluttonous eating.

Engorge

Overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself;
She stuffed herself at the dinner
The kids binged on icecream

Gorge

The contents of the stomach; something swallowed.

Gorge

A mass obstructing a narrow passage
A shipping lane blocked by an ice gorge.

Gorge

The seam on the front of a coat or jacket where the lapel and the collar are joined.

Gorge

To stuff with food; glut
Gorged themselves with candy.

Gorge

To devour greedily.

Gorge

To eat gluttonously.

Gorge

(archaic) The front aspect of the neck; the outside of the throat.

Gorge

The inside of the throat; the esophagus, the gullet; the crop or gizzard of a hawk.

Gorge

Food that has been taken into the gullet or the stomach, particularly if it is regurgitated or vomited out.

Gorge

(US) A choking or filling of a channel or passage by an obstruction; the obstruction itself.
An ice gorge in a river

Gorge

(architectural element) A concave moulding; a cavetto.

Gorge

The rearward side of an outwork, a bastion, or a fort, often open, or not protected against artillery; a narrow entry passage into the outwork of an enclosed fortification.

Gorge

(fishing) A primitive device used instead of a hook to catch fish, consisting of an object that is easy to swallow but difficult to eject or loosen, such as a piece of bone or stone pointed at each end and attached in the middle to a line.

Gorge

(geography) A deep, narrow passage with steep, rocky sides, particularly one with a stream running through it; a ravine.

Gorge

(mechanical engineering) The groove of a pulley.

Gorge

An act of gorging.

Gorge

To stuff the gorge or gullet with food; to eat greedily and in large quantities. on
They gorged themselves on chocolate and cake.

Gorge

(transitive) To swallow, especially with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities.

Gorge

(transitive) To fill up to the throat; to glut, to satiate.

Gorge

(transitive) To fill up (an organ, a vein, etc.); to block up or obstruct; of ice: to choke or fill a channel or passage, causing an obstruction.

Gorge

(slang) Gorgeous.
Oh, look at him: isn’t he gorge?

Gorge

The throat; the gullet; the canal by which food passes to the stomach.
Wherewith he gripped her gorge with so great pain.
Now, how abhorred! . . . my gorge rises at it.

Gorge

A narrow passage or entrance

Gorge

That which is gorged or swallowed, especially by a hawk or other fowl.
And all the way, most like a brutish beast,e spewed up his gorge, that all did him detest.

Gorge

A filling or choking of a passage or channel by an obstruction; as, an ice gorge in a river.

Gorge

A concave molding; a cavetto.

Gorge

The groove of a pulley.

Gorge

A primitive device used instead of a fishhook, consisting of an object easy to be swallowed but difficult to be ejected or loosened, as a piece of bone or stone pointed at each end and attached in the middle to a line.

Gorge

To swallow; especially, to swallow with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities.
The fish has gorged the hook.

Gorge

To glut; to fill up to the throat; to satiate.
The giant gorged with flesh.
Gorge with my blood thy barbarous appetite.

Gorge

To eat greedily and to satiety.

Gorge

A deep ravine (usually with a river running through it)

Gorge

A narrow pass (especially one between mountains)

Gorge

The passage between the pharynx and the stomach

Gorge

Overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself;
She stuffed herself at the dinner
The kids binged on icecream

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