VS.

Energy vs. Essence

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Energynoun

The impetus behind all motion and all activity.

Essencenoun

The inherent nature of a thing or idea.

Energynoun

The capacity to do work.

Essencenoun

(philosophy) The true nature of anything, not accidental or illusory.

Energynoun

(physics) A quantity that denotes the ability to do work and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance²/time² (ML²/T²) or the equivalent.

Essencenoun

Constituent substance.

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Energynoun

An intangible, modifiable force (often characterized as either 'positive' or 'negative') believed in some New Age religions to emanate from a person, place or thing and which is (or can be) preserved and transferred in human interactions; shared mood or group habit; a vibe, a feeling, an impression. aura.}}

Essencenoun

A being; especially, a purely spiritual being.

Energynoun

A measure of how many actions a player or unit can take; in the fantasy genre often called magic points or mana.

‘action points’;

Essencenoun

A significant feature of something.

Energynoun

Internal or inherent power; capacity of acting, operating, or producing an effect, whether exerted or not; as, men possessing energies may suffer them to lie inactive.

‘The great energies of nature are known to us only by their effects.’;

Essencenoun

The concentrated form of a plant or drug obtained through a distillation process.

‘essence of Jojoba’;

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Energynoun

Power efficiently and forcibly exerted; vigorous or effectual operation; as, the energy of a magistrate.

Essencenoun

An extract or concentrate obtained from a plant or other matter used for flavouring.

‘vanilla essence’;

Energynoun

Strength of expression; force of utterance; power to impress the mind and arouse the feelings; life; spirit; - said of speech, language, words, style; as, a style full of energy.

Essencenoun

Fragrance, a perfume.

Energynoun

Capacity for performing work.

Essencenoun

The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence.

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Energynoun

(physics) the capacity of a physical system to do work; the units of energy are joules or ergs;

‘energy can take a wide variety of forms’;

Essencenoun

The constituent quality or qualities which belong to any object, or class of objects, or on which they depend for being what they are (distinguished as real essence); the real being, divested of all logical accidents; that quality which constitutes or marks the true nature of anything; distinctive character; hence, virtue or quality of a thing, separated from its grosser parts.

‘The laws are at present, both in form and essence, the greatest curse that society labors under.’; ‘Gifts and alms are the expressions, not the essence of this virtue [charity].’; ‘The essence of Addison's humor is irony.’;

Energynoun

an exertion of force;

‘he plays tennis with great energy’;

Essencenoun

Constituent substance.

‘And uncompounded is their essence pure.’;

Energynoun

enterprising or ambitious drive;

‘Europeans often laugh at American energy’;

Essencenoun

A being; esp., a purely spiritual being.

‘As far as gods and heavenly essencesCan perish.’; ‘He had been indulging in fanciful speculations on spiritual essences, until . . . he had and ideal world of his own around him.’;

Energynoun

an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing);

‘his writing conveys great energy’;

Essencenoun

The predominant qualities or virtues of a plant or drug, extracted and refined from grosser matter; or, more strictly, the solution in spirits of wine of a volatile or essential oil; as, the essence of mint, and the like.

‘The . . . word essence . . . scarcely underwent a more complete transformation when from being the abstract of the verb "to be," it came to denote something sufficiently concrete to be inclosed in a glass bottle.’;

Energynoun

a healthy capacity for vigorous activity;

‘jogging works off my excess energy’; ‘he seemed full of vim and vigor’;

Essencenoun

Perfume; odor; scent; or the volatile matter constituting perfume.

‘Nor let the essences exhale.’;

Energynoun

the federal department responsible for maintaining a national energy policy of the United States; created in 1977

Essenceverb

To perfume; to scent.

Energy

In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to a body or physical system to perform work on the body, or to heat it. Energy is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed.

Essencenoun

the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience;

‘the gist of the prosecutor's argument’; ‘the heart and soul of the Republican Party’; ‘the nub of the story’;

Essencenoun

any substance possessing to a high degree the predominant properties of a plant or drug or other natural product from which it is extracted

Essencenoun

the central meaning or theme of a speech or literary work

Essencenoun

a toiletry that emits and diffuses a fragrant odor

Essencenoun

the intrinsic nature or indispensable quality of something, especially something abstract, which determines its character

‘conflict is the essence of drama’;

Essencenoun

a property or group of properties of something without which it would not exist or be what it is

‘Locke's scepticism about our ability to penetrate to the real essences of things’;

Essencenoun

an extract or concentrate obtained from a plant or other matter and used for flavouring or scent

‘vanilla essence’;

Essence

Essence (Latin: essentia) is a polysemic term, used in philosophy and theology as a designation for the property or set of properties that make an entity or substance what it fundamentally is, and which it has by necessity, and without which it loses its identity. Essence is contrasted with accident: a property that the entity or substance has contingently, without which the substance can still retain its identity.

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