VS.

Endure vs. Weather

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Endureverb

(intransitive) To continue or carry on, despite obstacles or hardships.

‘The singer's popularity endured for decades.’;

Weathernoun

The short term state of the atmosphere at a specific time and place, including the temperature, relative humidity, cloud cover, precipitation, wind, etc.

Endureverb

(transitive) To tolerate or put up with something unpleasant.

Weathernoun

Unpleasant or destructive atmospheric conditions, and their effects.

‘Wooden garden furniture must be well oiled as it is continuously exposed to weather.’;

Endureverb

(intransitive) To last.

‘Our love will endure forever.’;

Weathernoun

(nautical) The direction from which the wind is blowing; used attributively to indicate the windward side.

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Endureverb

To remain firm, as under trial or suffering; to suffer patiently or without yielding; to bear up under adversity; to hold out.

Weathernoun

A situation.

Endureverb

(transitive) To suffer patiently.

‘He endured years of pain.’;

Weathernoun

(obsolete) A storm; a tempest.

Endureverb

(obsolete) To indurate.

Weathernoun

(obsolete) A light shower of rain.

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Endureverb

To continue in the same state without perishing; to last; to remain.

‘Their verdure still endure.’; ‘He shall hold it [his house] fast, but it shall not endure.’;

Weatheradjective

Facing towards the flow of a fluid, usually air.

‘weather side, weather helm’;

Endureverb

To remain firm, as under trial or suffering; to suffer patiently or without yielding; to bear up under adversity; to hold out.

‘Can thine heart endure, or can thine hands be strong in the days that I shall deal with thee?’;

Weatherverb

To expose to the weather, or show the effects of such exposure, or to withstand such effects.

Endureverb

To remain firm under; to sustain; to undergo; to support without breaking or yielding; as, metals endure a certain degree of heat without melting; to endure wind and weather.

‘Both were of shining steel, and wrought so pure,As might the strokes of two such arms endure.’;

Weatherverb

(by extension) To sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to endure; to resist.

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Endureverb

To bear with patience; to suffer without opposition or without sinking under the pressure or affliction; to bear up under; to put up with; to tolerate.

‘I will no longer endure it.’; ‘Therefore I endure all things for the elect's sake.’; ‘How can I endure to see the evil that shall come unto my people?’;

Weatherverb

To break down, of rocks and other materials, under the effects of exposure to rain, sunlight, temperature, and air.

Endureverb

To harden; to toughen; to make hardy.

‘Manly limbs endured with little ease.’;

Weatherverb

(nautical) To pass to windward in a vessel, especially to beat 'round.

‘to weather a cape; to weather another ship’;

Endureverb

put up with something or somebody unpleasant;

‘I cannot bear his constant criticism’; ‘The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks’; ‘he learned to tolerate the heat’; ‘She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage’;

Weatherverb

(nautical) To endure or survive an event or action without undue damage.

‘Joshua weathered a collision with a freighter near South Africa.’;

Endureverb

face or endure with courage;

‘She braved the elements’;

Weatherverb

(falconry) To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air.

Endureverb

continue to live; endure or last;

‘We went without water and food for 3 days’; ‘These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America’; ‘The racecar driver lived through several very serious accidents’;

Weathernoun

The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; meteorological condition of the atmosphere; as, warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather, etc.

‘Not amiss to cool a man's stomach this hot weather.’; ‘Fair weather cometh out of the north.’;

Endureverb

undergo or be subjected to;

‘He suffered the penalty’; ‘Many saints suffered martyrdom’;

Weathernoun

Vicissitude of season; meteorological change; alternation of the state of the air.

Endureverb

last and be usable;

‘This dress wore well for almost ten years’;

Weathernoun

Storm; tempest.

‘What gusts of weather from that gathering cloudMy thoughts presage!’;

Endureverb

persist or be long; in time;

‘The bad weather lasted for three days’;

Weathernoun

A light rain; a shower.

‘Peace to the artist whose ingenious thoughtDevised the weather house, that useful toy!’;

Endureverb

continue to exist;

‘These stories die hard’; ‘The legend of Elvis endures’;

Weatherverb

To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air.

‘[An eagle] soaring through his wide empire of the airTo weather his broad sails.’; ‘This gear lacks weathering.’;

Endure

Endure is a 2010 crime thriller film directed and written by Joe O'Brien. It stars Judd Nelson, Devon Sawa, Tom Arnold and Joey Lauren Adams.

Weatherverb

Hence, to sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to sustain; to endure; to resist; as, to weather the storm.

‘For I can weather the roughest gale.’; ‘You will weather the difficulties yet.’;

Weatherverb

To sail or pass to the windward of; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship.

Weatherverb

To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air.

Weatherverb

To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather.

‘The organisms . . . seem indestructible, while the hard matrix in which they are imbedded has weathered from around them.’;

Weatheradjective

Being toward the wind, or windward - opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc.

‘To veer, and tack, and steer a causeAgainst the weather gauge of laws.’;

Weathernoun

the meteorological conditions: temperature and wind and clouds and precipitation;

‘they were hoping for good weather’; ‘every day we have weather conditions and yesterday was no exception’;

Weatherverb

face or endure with courage;

‘She braved the elements’;

Weatherverb

cause to slope

Weatherverb

sail to the windward of

Weatherverb

change under the action or influence of the weather;

‘A weathered old hut’;

Weatheradjective

towards the side exposed to wind

Weather

Weather is the state of the atmosphere, describing for example the degree to which it is hot or cold, wet or dry, calm or stormy, clear or cloudy. On Earth, most weather phenomena occur in the lowest layer of the planet's atmosphere, the troposphere, just below the stratosphere.

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