VS.

Encourage vs. Compulsory

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Encourageverb

To mentally support; to motivate, give courage, hope or spirit.

‘I encouraged him during his race.’;

Compulsoryadjective

Required; obligatory; mandatory.

‘The ten-dollar fee was compulsory.’;

Encourageverb

To spur on, strongly recommend.

‘We encourage the use of bicycles in the town centre.’;

Compulsoryadjective

Having the power of compulsion; constraining.

‘Such compulsory measures are limited.’;

Encourageverb

To foster, give help or patronage

‘''The royal family has always encouraged the arts in word and deed’;

Compulsorynoun

Something that is compulsory or required.

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Encourageverb

To give courage to; to inspire with courage, spirit, or hope; to raise, or to increase, the confidence of; to animate; enhearten; to incite; to help forward; - the opposite of discourage.

‘David encouraged himself in the Lord.’;

Compulsoryadjective

Having the power of compulsion; constraining.

Encourageverb

contribute to the progress or growth of;

‘I am promoting the use of computers in the classroom’;

Compulsoryadjective

Obligatory; enjoined by authority; necessary; due to compulsion.

‘This contribution threatening to fall infinitely short of their hopes, they soon made it compulsory.’;

Encourageverb

inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to

Compulsoryadjective

required by rule;

‘in most schools physical education are compulsory’; ‘attendance is mandatory’; ‘required reading’;

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Encourageverb

spur on;

‘His financial success encouraged him to look for a wife’;

Compulsoryadjective

required by law or a rule; obligatory

‘compulsory military service’; ‘it was compulsory to attend mass’;

Compulsoryadjective

involving or exercising compulsion; coercive

‘the abuse of compulsory powers’;

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