VS.

Encompass vs. Entail

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Encompassverb

(transitive) To form a circle around; to encircle.

Entailverb

(transitive) To imply or require.

‘This activity will entail careful attention to detail.’;

Encompassverb

(transitive) To include within its scope; to circumscribe or go round so as to surround; to enclose; to contain.

Entailverb

(transitive) To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; -- said especially of an estate; to bestow as a heritage.

Encompassverb

(transitive) To include completely; to describe fully or comprehensively.

‘This book on English grammar encompasses all irregular verbs.’;

Entailverb

To appoint hereditary possessor.

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Encompassverb

(transitive) To go around, especially, to circumnavigate.

‘Drake encompassed the globe.’;

Entailverb

To cut or carve in an ornamental way.

Encompassverb

To circumscribe or go round so as to surround closely; to encircle; to inclose; to environ; as, a ring encompasses the finger; an army encompasses a city; a voyage encompassing the world.

‘A question may be encompassed with difficulty.’; ‘The love of all thy sons encompass thee.’;

Entailnoun

That which is entailed. Hence:

Encompassverb

include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory;

‘This group encompasses a wide range of people from different backgrounds’; ‘this should cover everyone in the group’;

Entailnoun

An estate in fee entailed, or limited in descent to a particular class of issue.

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Encompass

Encompass, the Enterprise Computing Association, was the original computer user group for business customers of Hewlett-Packard. Encompass's history began with DECUS, founded in 1961, for customers of the Digital Equipment Corporation, which was acquired in 1998 by Compaq.

Entailnoun

The rule by which the descent is fixed.

Entailnoun

(obsolete) Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio.

Entailnoun

That which is entailed.

‘A power of breaking the ancient entails, and of alienating their estates.’;

Entailnoun

Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio.

Entailverb

To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; - said especially of an estate; to bestow as an heritage.

‘Allowing them to entail their estates.’; ‘I here entailThe crown to thee and to thine heirs forever.’;

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Entailverb

To appoint hereditary possessor.

‘To entail him and his heirs unto the crown.’;

Entailverb

To cut or carve in an ornamental way.

‘Entailed with curious antics.’;

Entailnoun

land received by fee tail

Entailnoun

the act of entailing property; the creation of a fee tail from a fee simple

Entailverb

have as a logical consequence;

‘The water shortage means that we have to stop taking long showers’;

Entailverb

impose, involve, or imply as a necessary accompaniment or result;

‘What does this move entail?’;

Entailverb

limit the inheritance of property to a specific class of heirs

Entailverb

involve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence

‘a situation which entails considerable risks’;

Entailverb

have as a logically necessary consequence.

Entailverb

limit the inheritance of (property) over a number of generations so that ownership remains within a particular family or group

‘her father's estate was entailed on a cousin’;

Entailverb

cause to experience or possess (something) permanently or inescapably

‘I cannot get rid of the disgrace which you have entailed upon us’;

Entailnoun

a limitation of the inheritance of property to certain heirs over a number of generations

‘landed property was governed by primogeniture and entail’; ‘the damage being done in England by entails’;

Entailnoun

a property bequeathed under an entail

‘the spinning mills were not part of the entail’;

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