VS.

Emerge vs. Expose

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Emergeverb

(intransitive) To come into view.

Exposeverb

(transitive) To reveal, uncover, make visible, bring to light, introduce to.

Emergeverb

To come out of a situation, object or a liquid.

‘He emerged unscathed from the accident.’; ‘The Soviet Union emerged from the ruins of an empire.’; ‘The submarine emerged from the ocean.’;

Exposeverb

(transitive) To subject photographic film to light thereby recording an image.

Emergeverb

(intransitive) To become known.

‘Gradually the truth emerged.’;

Exposeverb

(transitive) To abandon, especially an unwanted baby in the wilderness.

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Emergeverb

To rise out of a fluid; to come forth from that in which anything has been plunged, enveloped, or concealed; to issue and appear; as, to emerge from the water or the ocean; the sun emerges from behind the moon in an eclipse; to emerge from poverty or obscurity.

‘Those who have emerged from very low, some from the lowest, classes of society.’;

Exposeverb

To submit to an active (mostly dangerous) substance like an allergen, ozone, nicotine, solvent, or to any other stress, in order to test the reaction, resistance, etc.

Emergeverb

come out into view, as from concealment;

‘Suddenly, the proprietor emerged from his office’;

Exposeverb

To make available to other parts of a program, or to other programs.

Emergeverb

come out of;

‘Water issued from the hole in the wall’; ‘The words seemed to come out by themselves’;

Exposeverb

To set forth; to set out to public view; to exhibit; to show; to display; as, to expose goods for sale; to expose pictures to public inspection.

‘Those who seek truth only, freely expose their principles to the test, and are pleased to have them examined.’;

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Emergeverb

become known or apparent;

‘Some nice results emerged from the study’;

Exposeverb

To lay bare; to lay open to attack, danger, or anything objectionable; to render accessible to anything which may affect, especially detrimentally; to make liable; as, to expose one's self to the heat of the sun, or to cold, insult, danger, or ridicule; to expose an army to destruction or defeat.

‘Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel.’;

Emergeverb

come up to the surface of or rise;

‘He felt new emotions emerge’;

Exposeverb

To deprive of concealment; to discover; to lay open to public inspection, or bring to public notice, as a thing that shuns publicity, something criminal, shameful, or the like; as, to expose the faults of a neighbor.

‘You only expose the follies of men, without arraigning their vices.’;

Emergeverb

happen or occur as a result of something

Exposeverb

To disclose the faults or reprehensible practices of; to lay open to general condemnation or contempt by making public the character or arts of; as, to expose a cheat, liar, or hypocrite.

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Exposenoun

A formal recital or exposition of facts; exposure, or revelation, of something which some one wished to keep concealed.

Exposenoun

the exposure of an impostor or a fraud;

‘he published an expose of the graft and corruption in city government’;

Exposeverb

expose or make accessible to some action or influence;

‘Expose your students to art’; ‘expose the blanket to sunshine’;

Exposeverb

make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret;

‘The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold’; ‘The actress won't reveal how old she is’; ‘bring out the truth’; ‘he broke the news to her’;

Exposeverb

to show, make visible or apparent;

‘The Metropolitan Museum is exhibiting Goya's works this month’; ‘Why don't you show your nice legs and wear shorter skirts?’; ‘National leaders will have to display the highest skills of statesmanship’;

Exposeverb

remove all or part of one's clothes to show one's body;

‘uncover your belly’; ‘The man exposed himself in the subway’;

Exposeverb

disclose to view as by removing a cover;

‘The curtain rose to disclose a stunning set’;

Exposeverb

put in a dangerous, disadvantageous, or difficult position

Exposeverb

expose to light, of photographic film

Exposeverb

expose while ridiculing; especially of pretentious or false claims and ideas;

‘The physicist debunked the psychic's claims’;

Exposeverb

abandon by leaving out in the open air;

‘The infant was exposed by the teenage mother’; ‘After Christmas, many pets get abandoned’;

Exposeverb

make (something) visible by uncovering it

‘at low tide the sands are exposed’;

Exposeverb

unprotected, especially from the weather

‘the coast is very exposed to the south-west’;

Exposeverb

cause someone to be vulnerable or at risk

‘many newcomers are exposing themselves to injury’;

Exposeverb

introduce someone to (a subject or area of knowledge)

‘students were exposed to statistics in high school’;

Exposeverb

publicly and indecently display one's genitals

‘police are hunting a man who exposed himself to a schoolgirl’;

Exposeverb

leave (a child) in the open to die.

Exposeverb

reveal the true, objectionable nature of (someone or something)

‘he has been exposed as a liar and a traitor’;

Exposeverb

make (something embarrassing or damaging) public

‘the situation exposed a conflict within the government’;

Exposeverb

subject (photographic film) to light when operating a camera

‘all over Europe, thousands of miles of film are exposed for holiday snaps’;

Exposenoun

a report in the media that reveals something discreditable

‘a shocking exposé of a medical cover-up’;

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