VS.

Embosom vs. Embrace

Published:

Embosomverb

To draw to or into one's bosom; to treasure.

Embraceverb

To clasp (someone or each other) in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.

Embosomverb

To enclose, surround, or protect.

Embraceverb

(obsolete) To accept (someone) as a friend or servant.

Embosomverb

To take into, or place in, the bosom; to cherish; to foster.

‘Glad to embosom his affection.’;

Embraceverb

To seize (something) eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome.

‘I wholeheartedly embrace the new legislation.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Embosomverb

To inclose or surround; to shelter closely; to place in the midst of something.

‘His house embosomed in the grove.’; ‘Some tender flower . . . .Embosomed in the greenest glade.’;

Embraceverb

To accept; to undergo; to submit to.

Embraceverb

To encircle; to encompass; to enclose.

Embraceverb

(figurative) To enfold, to include (ideas, principles, etc.); to encompass.

‘Natural philosophy embraces many sciences.’;

Embraceverb

(obsolete) To fasten on, as armour.

Embraceverb

(legal) To attempt to influence (a jury, court, etc.) corruptly; to practise embracery.

ADVERTISEMENT

Embracenoun

Hug noun; putting arms around someone.

Embracenoun

Enclosure, (partially or fully) surrounding someone or something.

Embracenoun

Full acceptance (of something).

Embracenoun

(figuratively) Enfolding, including.

Embraceverb

To fasten on, as armor.

Embraceverb

To clasp in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.

‘I will embrace him with a soldier's arm,That he shall shrink under my courtesy.’; ‘Paul called unto him the disciples, and embraced them.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Embraceverb

To cling to; to cherish; to love.

Embraceverb

To seize eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome.

‘What is there that he may not embrace for truth?’;

Embraceverb

To encircle; to encompass; to inclose.

‘Low at his feet a spacious plain is placed,Between the mountain and the stream embraced.’;

Embraceverb

To include as parts of a whole; to comprehend; to take in; as, natural philosophy embraces many sciences.

‘Not that my song, in such a scanty space,So large a subject fully can embrace.’;

Embraceverb

To accept; to undergo; to submit to.

Embraceverb

To attempt to influence corruptly, as a jury or court.

Embraceverb

To join in an embrace.

Embracenoun

Intimate or close encircling with the arms; pressure to the bosom; clasp; hug.

‘We stood tranced in long embraces,Mixed with kisses.’;

Embracenoun

the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection)

Embracenoun

the state of taking in or encircling;

‘an island in the embrace of the sea’;

Embracenoun

a close affectionate and protective acceptance;

‘his willing embrace of new ideas’; ‘in the bosom of the family’;

Embraceverb

include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory;

‘This group encompasses a wide range of people from different backgrounds’; ‘this should cover everyone in the group’;

Embraceverb

hug, usually with fondness;

‘Hug me, please’; ‘They embraced’;

Embraceverb

take up the cause, ideology, practice, method, of someone and use it as one's own;

‘She embraced Catholocism’; ‘They adopted the Jewish faith’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons