VS.

Embody vs. Imbody

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Embodyverb

(transitive) To represent in a physical or concrete form; to incarnate or personify.

‘As the car salesman approached, wearing a plaid suit and slicked-back hair, he seemed to embody sleaze.’;

Imbodyverb

To become corporeal; to assume the qualities of a material body. See Embody.

‘The soul grows clotted by contagion,Imbodies, and imbrutes.’;

Embodyverb

(transitive) To represent in some other form, such as a code of laws.

‘The US Constitution aimed to embody the ideals of diverse groups of people, from Puritans to Deists.’; ‘The principle was recognized by some of the early Greek philosophers who embodied it in their systems.’;

Embodyverb

(transitive) To comprise or include as part of a cohesive whole; to be made up of.

Embodyverb

(intransitive) To unite in a body or mass.

Embodyverb

To form into a body; to invest with a body; to collect into a body, a united mass, or a whole; to incorporate; as, to embody one's ideas in a treatise.

‘Devils embodied and disembodied.’; ‘The soul, while it is embodied, can no more be divided from sin.’;

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Embodyverb

To unite in a body, a mass, or a collection; to coalesce.

‘Firmly to embody against this court party.’;

Embodyverb

represent in bodily form;

‘He embodies all that is evil wrong with the system’; ‘The painting substantiates the feelings of the artist’;

Embodyverb

represent, as of a character on stage;

‘Derek Jacobi was Hamlet’;

Embodyverb

represent or express something abstract in tangible form;

‘This painting embodies the feelings of the Romantic period’;

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