VS.

Embark vs. Imbark

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Embarkverb

To get on a boat or ship or (outside the USA) an aeroplane.

‘All passengers please embark now.’;

Imbarkverb

See Embark.

Embarkverb

To start, begin.

‘Phil embarked on his journey yesterday.’;

Embarkverb

(transitive) To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard.

Embarkverb

(transitive) To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair.

‘He embarked his fortune in trade.’;

Embarkverb

To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard.

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Embarkverb

To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair; as, he embarked his fortune in trade.

‘It was the reputation of the sect upon which St. Paul embarked his salvation.’;

Embarkverb

To go on board a vessel or a boat for a voyage; as, the troops embarked for Lisbon.

Embarkverb

To engage in any affair.

‘Slow to embark in such an undertaking.’;

Embarkverb

go on board

Embarkverb

set out on (an enterprise, subject of study, etc.);

‘she embarked upon a new career’;

Embarkverb

proceed somewhere despite the risk of possible dangers;

‘We ventured into the world of high-tech and bought a supercomputer’;

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Embarkverb

go on board a ship or aircraft

‘he embarked for India in 1817’;

Embarkverb

put or take on board a ship or aircraft

‘the passengers were ready to be embarked’;

Embarkverb

begin (a course of action)

‘she embarked on a new career’;

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