VS.

Elope vs. Marry

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Elopeverb

To run away from home with a paramour.

Marryverb

(intransitive) To enter into the conjugal or connubial state; to take a husband or a wife.

‘Neither of her daughters showed any desire to marry.’;

Elopeverb

To run away secretly for the purpose of getting married with one's intended spouse; to marry in a quick or private fashion, especially without a public period of engagement.

Marryverb

To be joined to (someone) as spouse according to law or custom.

‘She was not happily married.’; ‘His daughter was married some five years ago to a tailor's apprentice.’;

Elopeverb

To run away from home (for any reason).

Marryverb

(transitive) To arrange for the marriage of; to give away as wife or husband.

‘He was eager to marry his daughter to a nobleman.’;

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Elopeverb

To run away, or escape privately, from the place or station to which one is bound by duty; - said especially of a woman or a man, either married or unmarried, who runs away with a paramour or a sweetheart.

‘Great numbers of them [the women] have eloped from their allegiance.’;

Marryverb

(transitive) To take as husband or wife.

‘In some cultures, it is acceptable for an uncle to marry his niece.’;

Elopeverb

run away secretly with one's beloved;

‘The young couple eloped and got married in Las Vegas’;

Marryverb

To unite; to join together into a close union.

‘The attempt to marry medieval plainsong with speed metal produced interesting results.’;

Marryverb

(transitive) To unite in wedlock or matrimony; to perform the ceremony of joining spouses; to bring about a marital union according to the laws or customs of a place.

‘A justice of the peace will marry Jones and Smith.’;

Marryverb

(nautical) To place (two ropes) alongside each other so that they may be grasped and hauled on at the same time.

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Marryverb

(nautical) To join (two ropes) end to end so that both will pass through a block.

Marryinterjection

(obsolete) indeed!, in truth!; a term of asseveration.

Marryverb

To unite in wedlock or matrimony; to perform the ceremony of joining, as a man and a woman, for life; to constitute (a man and a woman) husband and wife according to the laws or customs of the place.

‘Tell him that he shall marry the couple himself.’;

Marryverb

To join according to law, (a man) to a woman as his wife, or (a woman) to a man as her husband. See the Note to def. 4.

‘A woman who had been married to her twenty-fifth husband, and being now a widow, was prohibited to marry.’;

Marryverb

To dispose of in wedlock; to give away as wife.

‘Mæcenas took the liberty to tell him [Augustus] that he must either marry his daughter [Julia] to Agrippa, or take away his life.’;

Marryverb

To take for husband or wife. See the Note below.

‘They got him [the Duke of Monmouth] . . . to declare in writing, that the last king [Charles II.] told him he was never married to his mother.’;

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Marryverb

Figuratively, to unite in the closest and most endearing relation.

‘Turn, O backsliding children, saith the Lord; for I am married unto you.’;

Marryverb

To enter into the conjugal or connubial state; to take a husband or a wife.

‘I will, therefore, that the younger women marry.’;

Marryinterjection

Indeed! in truth! - a term of asseveration said to have been derived from the practice of swearing by the Virgin Mary.

Marryverb

take in marriage

Marryverb

perform a marriage ceremony;

‘The minister married us on Saturday’; ‘We were wed the following week’; ‘The couple got spliced on Hawaii’;

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