Elicit vs. Illicit - What's the difference?

Wiktionary

  • Elicit (verb)

    To evoke, educe (emotions, feelings, responses, etc.); to generate, obtain, or provoke as a response or answer.

  • Elicit (verb)

    To draw out, bring out, bring forth (something latent); to obtain information from someone or something.

    "Fred wished to elicit the time of the meeting from Jane."

    "''Did you elicit a response?"

  • Elicit (verb)

    To use logic to arrive at truth; to derive by reason

    "deduce|construe"

  • Elicit (adjective)

    Elicited; drawn out; made real; open; evident.

  • Illicit (adjective)

    Not approved by law, but not invalid.

    "The bigamous marriage, while illicit, was not invalid."

  • Illicit (adjective)

    Breaking social norms.

  • Illicit (adjective)

    Unlawful.

  • Illicit (noun)

    A banned or unlawful item.

Webster Dictionary

  • Elicit (adjective)

    Elicited; drawn out; made real; open; evident.

  • Elicit

    To draw out or entice forth; to bring to light; to bring out against the will; to deduce by reason or argument; as, to elicit truth by discussion.

  • Illicit (adjective)

    Not permitted or allowed; prohibited; unlawful; as, illicit trade; illicit intercourse; illicit pleasure.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Elicit (verb)

    call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses);

    "arouse pity"

    "raise a smile"

    "evoke sympathy"

  • Elicit (verb)

    deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning);

    "We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant"

  • Elicit (verb)

    derive by reason;

    "elicit a solution"

  • Illicit (adjective)

    contrary to accepted morality (especially sexual morality) or convention;

    "an illicit association with his secretary"

  • Illicit (adjective)

    contrary to or forbidden by law;

    "an illegitimate seizure of power"

    "illicit trade"

    "an outlaw strike"

    "unlawful measures"

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