VS.

Edge vs. Line

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Edgenoun

The boundary line of a surface.

Linenoun

A path through two or more points (compare ‘segment’); a continuous mark, including as made by a pen; any path, curved or straight.

‘The arrow descended in a curved line.’;

Edgenoun

(geometry) A one-dimensional face of a polytope. In particular, the joining line between two vertices of a polygon; the place where two faces of a polyhedron meet.

Linenoun

(geometry) An infinitely extending one-dimensional figure that has no curvature; one that has length but not breadth or thickness.

Edgenoun

An advantage.

‘I have the edge on him.’;

Linenoun

A line segment; a continuous finite segment of such a figure.

Edgenoun

The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe; that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc.

Linenoun

(graph theory) An edge of a graph.

Edgenoun

A sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; an extreme verge.

‘The cup is right on the edge of the table.’; ‘He is standing on the edge of a precipice.’;

Linenoun

(geography) A circle of latitude or of longitude, as represented on a map.

Edgenoun

Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.

Linenoun

The equator.

Edgenoun

The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part (of a period of time)

‘in the edge of evening’;

Linenoun

(music) One of the straight horizontal and parallel prolonged strokes on and between which the notes are placed.

Edgenoun

(cricket) A shot where the ball comes off the edge of the bat, often unintentionally.

Linenoun

(cricket) The horizontal path of a ball towards the batsman (see also length).

Edgenoun

(graph theory) A connected pair of vertices in a graph.

Linenoun

(soccer) The goal line.

Edgenoun

In male masturbation, a level of sexual arousal that is maintained just short of reaching the point of inevitability, or climax; see also edging.

Linenoun

A rope, cord, string, or thread, of any thickness.

Edgeverb

(transitive) To move an object slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

‘He edged the book across the table.’;

Linenoun

A hose or pipe, of any size.

‘a brake line, the main water line to the house,’;

Edgeverb

(intransitive) To move slowly and carefully in a particular direction.

‘He edged away from her.’;

Linenoun

Direction, path.

‘the line of sight;’; ‘the line of vision’;

Edgeverb

(usually in the form 'just edge') To win by a small margin.

Linenoun

The wire connecting one telegraphic station with another, a telephone or internet cable between two points: a telephone or network connection.

‘I tried to make a call, but the line was dead.’; ‘a dedicated line;’; ‘a shared line’; ‘Please speak up, the line is very faint.’;

Edgeverb

To hit the ball with an edge of the bat, causing a fine deflection.

Linenoun

A clothesline.

Edgeverb

(transitive) To trim the margin of a lawn where the grass meets the sidewalk, usually with an electric or gas-powered lawn edger.

Linenoun

A letter, a written form of communication.

‘Drop me a line.’;

Edgeverb

(transitive) To furnish with an edge; to construct an edging.

Linenoun

A connected series of public conveyances, as a roadbed or railway track; and hence, an established arrangement for forwarding merchandise, etc.

‘a line of stages;’; ‘an express line’;

Edgeverb

To furnish with an edge, as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.

Linenoun

(military) A trench or rampart, or the non-physical demarcation of the extent of the territory occupied by specified forces.

Edgeverb

(figurative) To make sharp or keen; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.

Linenoun

The exterior limit of a figure or territory: a boundary, contour, or outline; a demarcation.

Edgeverb

To delay one's orgasm so as to remain almost at the point of orgasm.

Linenoun

A long tape or ribbon marked with units for measuring; a tape measure.

Edgenoun

The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument; as, the edge of an ax, knife, sword, or scythe.

‘He which hath the sharp sword with two edges.’; ‘Slander,Whose edge is sharper than the sword.’;

Linenoun

(obsolete) A measuring line or cord.

Edgenoun

Any sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; extreme verge; as, the edge of a table, a precipice.

‘Upon the edge of yonder coppice.’; ‘In worst extremes, and on the perilous edgeOf battle.’; ‘Pursue even to the very edge of destruction.’;

Linenoun

That which was measured by a line, such as a field or any piece of land set apart; hence, allotted place of abode.

Edgenoun

Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.

‘The full edge of our indignation.’; ‘Death and persecution lose all the ill that they can have, if we do not set an edge upon them by our fears and by our vices.’;

Linenoun

A threadlike crease or wrinkle marking the face, hand, or body; hence, a characteristic mark.

Edgenoun

The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part; as, in the edge of evening.

Linenoun

Lineament; feature; figure (of one's body).

Edgeverb

To furnish with an edge as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.

‘To edge her champion's sword.’;

Linenoun

A more-or-less straight sequence of people, objects, etc., either arranged as a queue or column and often waiting to be processed or dealt with, or arranged abreast of one another in a row (and contrasted with a column), as in a military formation.

‘The line forms on the right.’; ‘There is a line of houses.’;

Edgeverb

To shape or dress the edge of, as with a tool.

Linenoun

(military) The regular infantry of an army, as distinguished from militia, guards, volunteer corps, cavalry, artillery, etc.

Edgeverb

To furnish with a fringe or border; as, to edge a dress; to edge a garden with box.

‘Hills whose tops were edged with groves.’;

Linenoun

A series or succession of ancestors or descendants of a given person; a family or race; compare lineage.

Edgeverb

To make sharp or keen, figuratively; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.

‘By such reasonings, the simple were blinded, and the malicious edged.’;

Linenoun

A small amount of text. Specifically:

Edgeverb

To move by little and little or cautiously, as by pressing forward edgewise; as, edging their chairs forwards.

Linenoun

A written or printed row of letters, words, numbers, or other text, especially a row of words extending across a page or column, or a blank in place of such text.

‘The answer to the comprehension question can be found in the third line of the accompanying text.’;

Edgeverb

To move sideways; to move gradually; as, edge along this way.

Linenoun

A verse (in poetry).

Edgeverb

To sail close to the wind.

‘I must edge up on a point of wind.’;

Linenoun

A sentence of dialogue, especially in a play, movie, or the like.

‘He was perfecting his pickup lines for use at the bar.’; ‘"It is what it is" was one his more annoying lines.’;

Edgenoun

the boundary of a surface

Linenoun

A lie or exaggeration, especially one told to gain another's approval or prevent losing it.

‘Don't feed me a line!’;

Edgenoun

a sharp side formed by the intersection of two surfaces of an object;

‘he rounded the edges of the box’;

Linenoun

Course of conduct, thought, occupation, or policy; method of argument; department of industry, trade, or intellectual activity.

Edgenoun

a line determining the limits of an area

Linenoun

The official, stated position (or set of positions) of an individual or group, particularly a political or religious faction.

‘Remember, your answers must match the party line.’;

Edgenoun

the attribute of urgency;

‘his voice had an edge to it’;

Linenoun

A set of products or services sold by a business, or by extension, the business itself.

‘line of business, product line’; ‘How many buses does the line have?’; ‘The airline is in danger of bankruptcy.’;

Edgenoun

a slight competitive advantage;

‘he had an edge on the competition’;

Linenoun

(stock exchange) A number of shares taken by a jobber.

Edgenoun

a strip near the boundary of an object;

‘he jotted a note on the margin of the page’;

Linenoun

A measure of length:

Edgeverb

advance slowly, as if by inches;

‘He edged towards the car’;

Linenoun

(historical) A tsarist-era Russian unit of measure, approximately equal to one tenth of an English inch, used especially when measuring the calibre of firearms.

Edgeverb

provide with a border or edge;

‘edge the tablecloth with embroidery’;

Linenoun

One twelfth of an inch.

Edgeverb

lie adjacent to another or share a boundary;

‘Canada adjoins the U.S.’; ‘England marches with Scotland’;

Linenoun

One fortieth of an inch.

Edgeverb

provide with an edge;

‘edge a blade’;

Linenoun

(historical) A maxwell, a unit of magnetic flux.

Edgenoun

the outside limit of an object, area, or surface

‘she perched on the edge of a desk’; ‘a willow tree at the water's edge’;

Linenoun

The batter’s box.

Edgenoun

an area next to a steep drop

‘the cliff edge’;

Linenoun

The position in which the fencers hold their swords.

Edgenoun

the point immediately before something unpleasant or momentous occurs

‘the economy was teetering on the edge of recession’;

Linenoun

(engineering) Proper relative position or adjustment (of parts, not as to design or proportion, but with reference to smooth working).

‘the engine is in line / out of line’;

Edgenoun

the sharpened side of the blade of a cutting implement or weapon

‘a knife with a razor-sharp edge’;

Linenoun

A small portion or serving (of a powdery illegal drug).

Edgenoun

the line along which two surfaces of a solid meet.

Linenoun

(obsolete) Instruction; doctrine.

Edgenoun

an intense, sharp, or striking quality

‘a flamenco singer brings a primitive edge to the music’; ‘there was an edge of menace in his voice’;

Linenoun

(genetics) Population of cells derived from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup.

Edgenoun

a quality or factor which gives superiority over close rivals

‘his cars have the edge over his rivals'’;

Linenoun

(perfusion line) a set composed of a spike, a drip chamber, a clamp, a Y-injection site, a three-way stopcock and a catheter.

Edgeverb

provide with a border or edge

‘the pool is edged with paving’;

Linenoun

(ice hockey) A group of forwards that play together.

Edgeverb

move or cause to move gradually or furtively in a particular direction

‘Hazel quietly edged him away from the others’; ‘she tried to edge away from him’;

Linenoun

A vascular catheter.

‘patient had a line inserted’; ‘line' sepsis’;

Edgeverb

give an intense or sharp quality to

‘the bitterness that edged her voice’;

Linenoun

(obsolete) Flax; linen, particularly the longer fiber of flax.

Edgeverb

strike (the ball) with the edge of the bat; strike a ball delivered by (the bowler) with the edge of the bat

‘Haynes edged to slip’; ‘he edged a ball into his pad’;

Lineverb

(transitive) To place (objects) into a line (usually used with "up"); to form into a line; to align.

‘to line troops’; ‘some more, please’;

Edgeverb

ski with one's weight on the edges of one's skis

‘you will be edging early, controlling a parallel turn’;

Lineverb

(transitive) To place persons or things along the side of for security or defense; to strengthen by adding; to fortify.

‘to line works with soldiers’;

Lineverb

To form a line along.

Lineverb

(transitive) To mark with a line or lines, to cover with lines.

‘to line a copy book’;

Lineverb

To represent by lines; to delineate; to portray.

Lineverb

(transitive) To read or repeat line by line.

‘to line out a hymn’;

Lineverb

To form or enter into a line.

Lineverb

To hit a line drive; to hit a line drive which is caught for an out. Compare fly and ground.

‘Jones lined to left in his last at-bat.’;

Lineverb

To track (wild bees) to their nest by following their line of flight.

Lineverb

(transitive) To cover the inner surface of (something), originally especially with linen.

‘The bird lines its nest with soft grass.’; ‘to line a cloak with silk or fur’; ‘to line a box with paper or tin’; ‘paintings lined the walls of the cavernous dining room’;

Lineverb

To reinforce (the back of a book) with glue and glued scrap material such as fabric or paper.

Lineverb

(transitive) To fill or supply (something), as a purse with money.

‘to line the shelves’;

Lineverb

to copulate with, to impregnate.

Linenoun

Flax; linen.

Linenoun

The longer and finer fiber of flax.

Linenoun

A linen thread or string; a slender, strong cord; also, a cord of any thickness; a rope; a hawser; as, a fishing line; a line for snaring birds; a clothesline; a towline.

‘Who so layeth lines for to latch fowls.’;

Linenoun

A more or less threadlike mark of pen, pencil, or graver; any long mark; as, a chalk line.

Linenoun

The course followed by anything in motion; hence, a road or route; as, the arrow descended in a curved line; the place is remote from lines of travel.

Linenoun

Direction; as, the line of sight or vision.

Linenoun

A row of letters, words, etc., written or printed; esp., a row of words extending across a page or column.

Linenoun

A short letter; a note; as, a line from a friend.

Linenoun

A verse, or the words which form a certain number of feet, according to the measure.

‘In the preceding line Ulysses speaks of Nausicaa.’;

Linenoun

Course of conduct, thought, occupation, or policy; method of argument; department of industry, trade, or intellectual activity.

‘He is uncommonly powerful in his own line, but it is not the line of a first-rate man.’;

Linenoun

That which has length, but not breadth or thickness.

Linenoun

The exterior limit of a figure, plat, or territory; boundary; contour; outline.

‘Eden stretched her lineFrom Auran eastward to the royal towersOf great Seleucia.’;

Linenoun

A threadlike crease marking the face or the hand; hence, characteristic mark.

‘Though on his brow were graven lines austere.’; ‘He tipples palmistry, and dinesOn all her fortune-telling lines.’;

Linenoun

Lineament; feature; figure.

Linenoun

A straight row; a continued series or rank; as, a line of houses, or of soldiers; a line of barriers.

‘Unite thy forces and attack their lines.’;

Linenoun

A series or succession of ancestors or descendants of a given person; a family or race; as, the ascending or descending line; the line of descent; the male line; a line of kings.

‘Of his lineage am I, and his offspringBy very line, as of the stock real.’;

Linenoun

A connected series of public conveyances, and hence, an established arrangement for forwarding merchandise, etc.; as, a line of stages; an express line.

Linenoun

A circle of latitude or of longitude, as represented on a map.

Linenoun

A long tape, or a narrow ribbon of steel, etc., marked with subdivisions, as feet and inches, for measuring; a tapeline.

Linenoun

A measuring line or cord.

‘He marketh it out with a line.’;

Linenoun

That which was measured by a line, as a field or any piece of land set apart; hence, allotted place of abode.

‘The lines are fallen unto me in pleasant places; yea, I have a goodly heritage.’;

Linenoun

The proper relative position or adjustment of parts, not as to design or proportion, but with reference to smooth working; as, the engine is in line or out of line.

Linenoun

Instruction; doctrine.

‘Their line is gone out through all the earth.’;

Linenoun

The track and roadbed of a railway; railroad.

Linenoun

A row of men who are abreast of one another, whether side by side or some distance apart; - opposed to column.

Linenoun

A trench or rampart.

Linenoun

Form of a vessel as shown by the outlines of vertical, horizontal, and oblique sections.

Linenoun

One of the straight horizontal and parallel prolonged strokes on and between which the notes are placed.

Linenoun

A number of shares taken by a jobber.

Linenoun

A series of various qualities and values of the same general class of articles; as, a full line of hosiery; a line of merinos, etc.

Linenoun

The wire connecting one telegraphic station with another, or the whole of a system of telegraph wires under one management and name.

Linenoun

The reins with which a horse is guided by his driver.

Linenoun

A measure of length; one twelfth of an inch.

Lineverb

To cover the inner surface of; as, to line a cloak with silk or fur; to line a box with paper or tin.

‘The inside lined with rich carnation silk.’;

Lineverb

To put something in the inside of; to fill; to supply, as a purse with money.

‘The charge amounteth very high for any one man's purse, except lined beyond ordinary, to reach unto.’; ‘Till coffee has her stomach lined.’;

Lineverb

To place persons or things along the side of for security or defense; to strengthen by adding anything; to fortify; as, to line works with soldiers.

‘Line and new repair our towns of warWith men of courage and with means defendant.’;

Lineverb

To impregnate; - applied to brute animals.

Lineverb

To mark with a line or lines; to cover with lines; as, to line a copy book.

‘He had a healthy color in his cheeks, and his face, though lined, bore few traces of anxiety.’;

Lineverb

To represent by lines; to delineate; to portray.

Lineverb

To read or repeat line by line; as, to line out a hymn.

‘This custom of reading or lining, or, as it was frequently called "deaconing" the hymn or psalm in the churches, was brought about partly from necessity.’;

Lineverb

To form into a line; to align; as, to line troops.

Linenoun

a formation of people or things one beside another;

‘the line of soldiers advanced with their bayonets fixed’; ‘they were arrayed in line of battle’; ‘the cast stood in line for the curtain call’;

Linenoun

a mark that is long relative to its width;

‘He drew a line on the chart’; ‘The substance produced characteristic lines on the spectroscope’;

Linenoun

a formation of people or things one behind another;

‘the line stretched clear around the corner’; ‘you must wait in a long line at the checkout counter’;

Linenoun

a length (straight or curved) without breadth or thickness; the trace of a moving point

Linenoun

text consisting of a row of words written across a page or computer screen;

‘the letter consisted of three short lines’; ‘there are six lines in every stanza’;

Linenoun

a single frequency (or very narrow band) of radiation in a spectrum

Linenoun

a fortified position (especially one marking the most forward position of troops);

‘they attacked the enemy's line’;

Linenoun

the methodical process of logical reasoning;

‘I can't follow your line of reasoning’;

Linenoun

a conductor for transmitting electrical or optical signals or electric power

Linenoun

a connected series of events or actions or developments;

‘the government took a firm course’; ‘historians can only point out those lines for which evidence is available’;

Linenoun

a spatial location defined by a real or imaginary unidimensional extent

Linenoun

a slight depression in the smoothness of a surface;

‘his face has many lines’; ‘ironing gets rid of most wrinkles’;

Linenoun

a pipe used to transport liquids or gases;

‘a pipeline runs from the wells to the seaport’;

Linenoun

the road consisting of railroad track and roadbed

Linenoun

a telephone connection

Linenoun

acting in conformity;

‘in line with’; ‘he got out of line’; ‘toe the line’;

Linenoun

the descendants of one individual;

‘his entire lineage has been warriors’;

Linenoun

something (as a cord or rope) that is long and thin and flexible;

‘a washing line’;

Linenoun

the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money;

‘he's not in my line of business’;

Linenoun

in games or sports; a mark indicating positions or bounds of the playing area

Linenoun

(often plural) a means of communication or access;

‘it must go through official channels’; ‘lines of communication were set up between the two firms’;

Linenoun

a particular kind of product or merchandise;

‘a nice line of shoes’;

Linenoun

a commercial organization serving as a common carrier

Linenoun

space for one line of print (one column wide and 1/14 inch deep) used to measure advertising

Linenoun

the maximum credit that a customer is allowed

Linenoun

a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence;

‘she was humming an air from Beethoven’;

Linenoun

a short personal letter;

‘drop me a line when you get there’;

Linenoun

a conceptual separation or demarcation;

‘there is a narrow line between sanity and insanity’;

Linenoun

mechanical system in a factory whereby an article is conveyed through sites at which successive operations are performed on it

Lineverb

be in line with; form a line along;

‘trees line the riverbank’;

Lineverb

cover the interior of (garments);

‘line the gloves’;

Lineverb

make a mark or lines on a surface;

‘draw a line’; ‘trace the outline of a figure in the sand’;

Lineverb

mark with lines;

‘sorrow had lined his face’;

Lineverb

fill plentifully;

‘line one's pockets’;

Lineverb

reinforce with fabric;

‘lined books are more enduring’;

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