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Eclipse vs. Overshadow

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Eclipsenoun

(astronomy) An alignment of astronomical objects whereby one object comes between the observer (or notional observer) and another object, thus obscuring the latter.

Overshadowverb

(transitive) To obscure something by casting a shadow.

Eclipsenoun

Especially, an alignment whereby a planetary object (for example, the Moon) comes between the Sun and another planetary object (for example, the Earth), resulting in a shadow being cast by the middle planetary object onto the other planetary object.

Overshadowverb

(transitive) To dominate something and make it seem insignificant.

Eclipsenoun

A seasonal state of plumage in some birds, notably ducks, adopted temporarily after the breeding season and characterised by a dull and scruffy appearance.

Overshadowverb

(transitive) To shelter or protect.

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Eclipsenoun

Obscurity, decline, downfall

Overshadowverb

To throw a shadow, or shade, over; to darken; to obscure.

‘There was a cloud that overshadowed them.’;

Eclipseverb

(transitive) Of astronomical bodies, to cause an eclipse.

‘The Moon eclipsed the Sun.’;

Overshadowverb

To cover with a superior influence; to be viewed as more important than.

Eclipseverb

To overshadow; to be better or more noticeable than.

Overshadowverb

To cause to be sad or disappointing; to cast a sad shadow on; as, an accidental death overshadowed the joy of the festival.

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Eclipseverb

(Irish grammar) To undergo eclipsis.

Overshadowverb

exceed in importance; outweigh;

‘This problem overshadows our lives right now’;

Eclipsenoun

An interception or obscuration of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminous body, by the intervention of some other body, either between it and the eye, or between the luminous body and that illuminated by it. A lunar eclipse is caused by the moon passing through the earth's shadow; a solar eclipse, by the moon coming between the sun and the observer. A satellite is eclipsed by entering the shadow of its primary. The obscuration of a planet or star by the moon or a planet, though of the nature of an eclipse, is called an occultation. The eclipse of a small portion of the sun by Mercury or Venus is called a transit of the planet.

‘That fatal and perfidious bark,Built in the eclipse, and rigged with curses dark.’;

Overshadowverb

make appear small by comparison;

‘This year's debt dwarves that of last year’;

Eclipsenoun

The loss, usually temporary or partial, of light, brilliancy, luster, honor, consciousness, etc.; obscuration; gloom; darkness.

‘All the posterity of our fist parents suffered a perpetual eclipse of spiritual life.’; ‘As in the soft and sweet eclipse,When soul meets soul on lovers' lips.’;

Overshadowverb

cast a shadow upon;

‘The tall tree overshadowed the house’; ‘The tragedy overshadowed the couple's happiness’;

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Eclipseverb

To cause the obscuration of; to darken or hide; - said of a heavenly body; as, the moon eclipses the sun.

Eclipseverb

To obscure, darken, or extinguish the beauty, luster, honor, etc., of; to sully; to cloud; to throw into the shade by surpassing.

‘My joy of liberty is half eclipsed.’;

Eclipseverb

To suffer an eclipse.

‘While the laboring moonEclipses at their charms.’;

Eclipsenoun

one celestial body obscures another

Eclipseverb

exceed in importance; outweigh;

‘This problem overshadows our lives right now’;

Eclipseverb

cause an eclipse of (a celestial body) by intervention;

‘The Sun eclipses the moon today’; ‘Planets and stars often are occulted by other celestial bodies’;

Eclipseverb

cause an eclipse of; of celestial bodies;

‘The moon eclipsed the sun’;

Eclipsenoun

an obscuring of the light from one celestial body by the passage of another between it and the observer or between it and its source of illumination

‘an eclipse of the sun’;

Eclipsenoun

a loss of significance or power in relation to another person or thing

‘the election result marked the eclipse of the traditional right’;

Eclipsenoun

a phase during which the distinctive markings of a bird (especially a male duck) are obscured by moulting of the breeding plumage

‘eclipse plumage’;

Eclipseverb

(of a celestial body) obscure the light from or to (another celestial body)

‘Jupiter was eclipsed by the Moon’;

Eclipseverb

deprive (someone or something) of significance or power

‘the economy has eclipsed the environment as the main issue’;

Eclipseverb

obscure or block out (light)

‘a sea of blue sky violently eclipsed by showers’;

Eclipse

An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when an astronomical object or spacecraft is temporarily obscured, by passing into the shadow of another body or by having another body pass between it and the viewer. This alignment of three celestial objects is known as a syzygy.

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