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Drum vs. Timbrel — What's the Difference?

Drum vs. Timbrel — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Drum and Timbrel

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Drum

The drum is a member of the percussion group of musical instruments. In the Hornbostel-Sachs classification system, it is a membranophone.

Timbrel

The timbrel or tabret (also known as the tof of the ancient Hebrews, the deff of Islam, the adufe of the Moors of Spain) was the principal percussion instrument of the ancient Israelites. It resembled either a frame drum or a modern tambourine.

Drum

A percussion instrument sounded by being struck with sticks or the hands, typically cylindrical, barrel-shaped, or bowl-shaped, with a taut membrane over one or both ends
A shuffling dance to the beat of a drum

Timbrel

A tambourine or similar instrument.

Drum

A cylindrical container or receptacle
A drum of powdered bleach
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Timbrel

An ancient percussion instrument similar to a tambourine.

Drum

A house or flat.

Timbrel

An ancient percussion instrument rather like a simple tambourine.

Drum

An evening or afternoon tea party of a kind that was popular in the late 18th and early 19th century
A drum at Lady Beresford's

Timbrel

(intransitive) To play the timbrel.

Drum

A piece of reliable inside information
He had got the drum that the police wouldn't lock us up

Timbrel

(transitive) To accompany with the sound of the timbrel.

Drum

A long, narrow hill, especially one separating two parallel valleys.

Timbrel

A kind of drum, tabor, or tabret, in use from the highest antiquity.
Miriam . . . took a timbrel in her hand, and all the women went out after her with timbrels and with dances.

Drum

A fish that makes a drumming sound by vibrating its swim bladder, found mainly in estuarine and shallow coastal waters.

Timbrel

Small hand drum similar to a tambourine; formerly carried by itinerant jugglers

Drum

Play on a drum
He channelled his energies into drumming with local groups

Drum

Give (someone) reliable information or a warning
I'm drumming you, if they come I'm going

Drum

A percussion instrument consisting of a hollow cylinder or hemisphere with a membrane stretched tightly over one or both ends, played by beating with the hands or sticks.

Drum

A sound produced by this instrument.

Drum

Something resembling a drum in shape or structure, especially a barrellike metal container or a metal cylinder wound with cable, wire, or heavy rope.

Drum

A circular or polygonal wall supporting a dome or cupola. Also called tambour.

Drum

Any of the cylindrical stone blocks that are stacked to form the shaft of a column.

Drum

Any of various marine and freshwater fishes of the family Sciaenidae that make a drumming sound by vibrating certain muscles attached to the swim bladder.

Drum

(Anatomy) The eardrum.

Drum

To play a drum or drums.

Drum

To thump or tap rhythmically or continually
Nervously drummed on the table.

Drum

To produce a booming, reverberating sound by beating the wings, as certain birds do.

Drum

To perform (a piece or tune) on or as if on a drum.

Drum

To summon by or as if by beating a drum.

Drum

To make known to or force upon (a person) by constant repetition
Drummed the answers into my head.

Drum

To expel or dismiss in disgrace. Often used with out
Was drummed out of the army.

Drum

A percussive musical instrument spanned with a thin covering on at least one end for striking, forming an acoustic chamber; a membranophone.
Percussion instrument

Drum

Any similar hollow, cylindrical object.
Replace the drum unit of your printer.

Drum

A barrel or large cylindrical container for liquid transport and storage.
The restaurant ordered ketchup in 50-gallon drums.

Drum

(architecture) The encircling wall that supports a dome or cupola.

Drum

(architecture) Any of the cylindrical blocks that make up the shaft of a pillar.

Drum

A drumfish (family Sciaenidae).

Drum

A tip; a piece of information.

Drum

A small hill or ridge of hills.

Drum

A social gathering or assembly held in the evening.

Drum

A person's home; a house or other building, especially when insalubrious; a tavern, a brothel.

Drum

(informal) A drumstick (of chicken, turkey, etc).

Drum

(intransitive) To beat a drum.

Drum

(ambitransitive) To beat with a rapid succession of strokes.
The ruffed grouse drums with his wings.

Drum

(transitive) To drill or review in an attempt to establish memorization.
He’s still trying to drum Spanish verb conjugations into my head.

Drum

To throb, as the heart.

Drum

To go about, as a drummer does, to gather recruits, to draw or secure partisans, customers, etc.; used with for.

Drum

Of various animals, to make a vocalisation or mechanical sound that resembles drumming.

Drum

An instrument of percussion, consisting either of a hollow cylinder, over each end of which is stretched a piece of skin or vellum, to be beaten with a stick; or of a metallic hemisphere (kettledrum) with a single piece of skin to be so beaten; the common instrument for marking time in martial music; one of the pair of tympani in an orchestra, or cavalry band.
The drums cry bud-a-dub.

Drum

Anything resembling a drum in form

Drum

See Drumfish.

Drum

A noisy, tumultuous assembly of fashionable people at a private house; a rout.
Not unaptly styled a drum, from the noise and emptiness of the entertainment.

Drum

A tea party; a kettledrum.

Drum

To beat a drum with sticks; to beat or play a tune on a drum.

Drum

To beat with the fingers, as with drumsticks; to beat with a rapid succession of strokes; to make a noise like that of a beaten drum; as, the ruffed grouse drums with his wings.
Drumming with his fingers on the arm of his chair.

Drum

To throb, as the heart.

Drum

To go about, as a drummer does, to gather recruits, to draw or secure partisans, customers, etc,; - with for.

Drum

To execute on a drum, as a tune.

Drum

With out) To expel ignominiously, with beat of drum; as, to drum out a deserter or rogue from a camp, etc.

Drum

With up) To assemble by, or as by, beat of drum; to collect; to gather or draw by solicitation; as, to drum up recruits; to drum up customers.

Drum

A musical percussion instrument; usually consists of a hollow cylinder with a membrane stretch across each end

Drum

The sound of a drum;
He could hear the drums before he heard the fifes

Drum

A bulging cylindrical shape; hollow with flat ends

Drum

A cylindrical metal container used for shipping or storage of liquids

Drum

A hollow cast-iron cylinder attached to the wheel that forms part of the brakes

Drum

Small to medium-sized bottom-dwelling food and game fishes of shallow coastal and fresh waters that make a drumming noise

Drum

Make a rhythmic sound;
Rain drummed against the windshield
The drums beat all night

Drum

Play a percussion instrument

Drum

Study intensively, as before an exam;
I had to bone up on my Latin verbs before the final exam

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