VS.

Drive vs. Driver

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Drivenoun

Motivation to do or achieve something; ability coupled with ambition.

‘Crassus had wealth and wit, but Pompey had drive and Caesar as much again.’;

Drivernoun

One who drives something, in any sense of the verb to drive.

Drivenoun

Violent or rapid motion; a rushing onward or away; especially, a forced or hurried dispatch of business.

Drivernoun

Something that drives something, in any sense of the verb to drive.

Drivenoun

An act of driving animals forward, such as to be captured, hunted etc.

Drivernoun

A person who drives a motorized vehicle such as a car or a bus.

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Drivenoun

(military) A sustained advance in the face of the enemy to take a strategic objective.

‘Napoleon's drive on Moscow was as determined as it was disastrous.’;

Drivernoun

A person who drives some other vehicle.

Drivenoun

A motor that does not take fuel, but instead depends on a mechanism that stores potential energy for subsequent use.

‘Some old model trains have clockwork drives.’;

Drivernoun

(computing) A program that acts as an interface between an application and hardware, written specifically for the device it controls.

Drivenoun

A trip made in a vehicle (now generally in a motor vehicle).

‘It was a long drive.’;

Drivernoun

(golf) A golf club used to drive the ball a great distance.

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Drivenoun

A driveway.

‘The mansion had a long, tree-lined drive.’;

Drivernoun

(nautical) a kind of sail, smaller than a fore and aft spanker on a square-rigged ship, a driver is tied to the same spars.

Drivenoun

A type of public roadway.

‘Beverly Hills’ most famous street is Rodeo Drive.’;

Drivernoun

A mallet.

Drivenoun

(dated) A place suitable or agreeable for driving; a road prepared for driving.

Drivernoun

A tamping iron.

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Drivenoun

(psychology) Desire or interest.

Drivernoun

A cooper's hammer for driving on barrel hoops.

Drivenoun

(computing) An apparatus for reading and writing data to or from a mass storage device such as a disk, as a floppy drive.

Drivernoun

A screwdriver.

Drivenoun

(computing) A mass storage device in which the mechanism for reading and writing data is integrated with the mechanism for storing data, as a hard drive, a flash drive.

Drivernoun

One who, or that which, drives; the person or thing that urges or compels anything else to move onward.

Drivenoun

(golf) A stroke made with a driver.

Drivernoun

The person who drives beasts or a carriage; a coachman; a charioteer, etc.; hence, also, one who controls the movements of a any vehicle.

Drivenoun

A ball struck in a flat trajectory.

Drivernoun

An overseer of a gang of slaves or gang of convicts at their work.

Drivenoun

(cricket) A type of shot played by swinging the bat in a vertical arc, through the line of the ball, and hitting it along the ground, normally between cover and midwicket.

Drivernoun

A part that transmits motion to another part by contact with it, or through an intermediate relatively movable part, as a gear which drives another, or a lever which moves another through a link, etc. Specifically:

Drivenoun

(soccer) A straight level shot or pass.

Drivernoun

The driving wheel of a locomotive.

Drivenoun

(American football) An offensive possession, generally one consisting of several plays and/ or first downs, often leading to a scoring opportunity.

Drivernoun

The after sail in a ship or bark, being a fore-and-aft sail attached to a gaff; a spanker.

Drivenoun

A charity event such as a fundraiser, bake sale, or toy drive.

‘a whist drive; a beetle drive’;

Drivernoun

An implement used for driving;

Drivenoun

(typography) An impression or matrix formed by a punch drift.

Drivernoun

the operator of a motor vehicle

Drivenoun

A collection of objects that are driven; a mass of logs to be floated down a river.

Drivernoun

someone who drives animals that pull a vehicle

Driveverb

(transitive) To impel or urge onward by force; to push forward; to compel to move on.

‘to drive sheep out of a field’;

Drivernoun

a golfer who hits the golf ball with a driver

Driveverb

To direct a vehicle powered by a horse, ox or similar animal.

Drivernoun

(computer science) a program that determines how a computer will communicate with a peripheral device

Driveverb

(transitive) To cause animals to flee out of.

Drivernoun

a golf club (a wood) with a near vertical face that is used for hitting long shots from the tee

Driveverb

(transitive) To move (something) by hitting it with great force.

‘You drive nails into wood with a hammer.’;

Driveverb

(transitive) To cause (a mechanism) to operate.

‘The pistons drive the crankshaft.’;

Driveverb

To operate (a wheeled motorized vehicle).

‘drive a car’;

Driveverb

(transitive) To motivate; to provide an incentive for.

‘What drives a person to run a marathon?’;

Driveverb

(transitive) To compel (to do something).

‘Their debts finally drove them to sell the business.’;

Driveverb

(transitive) To cause to become.

‘This constant complaining is going to drive me to insanity.’; ‘You are driving me crazy!’;

Driveverb

To hit the ball with a drive.

Driveverb

(intransitive) To travel by operating a wheeled motorized vehicle.

‘I drive to work every day.’;

Driveverb

(transitive) To convey (a person, etc) in a wheeled motorized vehicle.

‘My wife drove me to the airport.’;

Driveverb

(intransitive) To move forcefully.

Driveverb

(intransitive) To be moved or propelled forcefully (especially of a ship).

Driveverb

(transitive) To urge, press, or bring to a point or state.

Driveverb

(transitive) To carry or to keep in motion; to conduct; to prosecute.

Driveverb

(transitive) To clear, by forcing away what is contained.

Driveverb

(mining) To dig horizontally; to cut a horizontal gallery or tunnel.

Driveverb

(American football) To put together a drive (n.): to string together offensive plays and advance the ball down the field.

Driveverb

(obsolete) To distrain for rent.

Driveverb

(transitive) To separate the lighter (feathers or down) from the heavier, by exposing them to a current of air.

Driveverb

To be the dominant party in a sex act.

Driveverb

To impel or urge onward by force in a direction away from one, or along before one; to push forward; to compel to move on; to communicate motion to; as, to drive cattle; to drive a nail; smoke drives persons from a room.

‘A storm came on and drove them into Pylos.’; ‘Shield pressed on shield, and man drove man along.’; ‘Go drive the deer and drag the finny prey.’;

Driveverb

To urge on and direct the motions of, as the beasts which draw a vehicle, or the vehicle borne by them; hence, also, to take in a carriage; to convey in a vehicle drawn by beasts; as, to drive a pair of horses or a stage; to drive a person to his own door.

‘How . . . proud he was to drive such a brother!’;

Driveverb

To urge, impel, or hurry forward; to force; to constrain; to urge, press, or bring to a point or state; as, to drive a person by necessity, by persuasion, by force of circumstances, by argument, and the like.

‘He, driven to dismount, threatened, if I did not do the like, to do as much for my horse as fortune had done for his.’;

Driveverb

To carry or; to keep in motion; to conduct; to prosecute.

‘The trade of life can not be driven without partners.’;

Driveverb

To clear, by forcing away what is contained.

‘To drive the country, force the swains away.’;

Driveverb

To dig Horizontally; to cut a horizontal gallery or tunnel.

Driveverb

To pass away; - said of time.

Driveverb

Specif., in various games, as tennis, baseball, etc., to propel (the ball) swiftly by a direct stroke or forcible throw.

Driveverb

to operate (a vehicle) while it is on motion, by manipulating the controls, such as the steering, propulsion, and braking mechanisms.

Driveverb

To rush and press with violence; to move furiously.

‘Fierce Boreas drove against his flying sails.’; ‘Under cover of the night and a driving tempest.’; ‘Time driveth onward fast,And in a little while our lips are dumb.’;

Driveverb

To be forced along; to be impelled; to be moved by any physical force or agent; to be driven.

‘The hull drives on, though mast and sail be torn.’; ‘The chaise drives to Mr. Draper's chambers.’;

Driveverb

To go by carriage; to pass in a carriage; to proceed by directing or urging on a vehicle or the animals that draw it; as, the coachman drove to my door.

Driveverb

To press forward; to aim, or tend, to a point; to make an effort; to strive; - usually with at.

‘Let them therefore declare what carnal or secular interest he drove at.’;

Driveverb

To distrain for rent.

Driveverb

To make a drive, or stroke from the tee.

Driveverb

to go from one place to another in a vehicle, serving as the operator of the vehicle; to drive{9} a vehicle from one location to another.

Drivenoun

In various games, as tennis, cricket, etc., the act of player who drives the ball; the stroke or blow; the flight of the ball, etc., so driven.

Drivenoun

A stroke from the tee, generally a full shot made with a driver; also, the distance covered by such a stroke.

Drivenoun

The act of driving; a trip or an excursion in a carriage, as for exercise or pleasure; - distinguished from a ride taken on horseback.

Drivenoun

A place suitable or agreeable for driving; a road prepared for driving.

Drivenoun

Violent or rapid motion; a rushing onward or away; esp., a forced or hurried dispatch of business.

‘The Murdstonian drive in business.’;

Drivenoun

In type founding and forging, an impression or matrix, formed by a punch drift.

Drivenoun

A collection of objects that are driven; a mass of logs to be floated down a river.

Drivenoun

a private road; a driveway.

Drivenoun

a strong psychological motivation to perform some activity.

Drivenoun

a device for reading or writing data from or to a data storage medium, as a disk drive, a tape drive, a CD drive, etc.

Drivenoun

an organized effort by a group to accomplish a goal within a limited period of time; as, a fund-raising drive.

Drivenoun

a physiological function of an organism motivating it to perform specific behaviors; as, the sex drive.

Drivenoun

the period during which one team sustains movement of the ball toward the opponent's goal without losing possession of the ball; as, a long drive downfield.

Drivenoun

an act of driving a vehicle, especially an automobile; the journey undertaken by driving an automobile; as, to go for a drive in the country.

Drivenoun

the mechanism which causes the moving parts of a machine to move; as, a belt drive.

Drivenoun

the way in which the propulsive force of a vehicle is transmitted to the road; as, a car with four-wheel drive, front-wheel drive, etc.

Drive

Driven.

Drivenoun

the act of applying force to propel something;

‘after reaching the desired velocity the drive is cut off’;

Drivenoun

a mechanism by which force or power is transmitted in a machine;

‘a variable speed drive permitted operation through a range of speeds’;

Drivenoun

a series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end;

‘he supported populist campaigns’; ‘they worked in the cause of world peace’; ‘the team was ready for a drive toward the pennant’; ‘the movement to end slavery’; ‘contributed to the war effort’;

Drivenoun

a road leading up to a private house;

‘they parked in the driveway’;

Drivenoun

the trait of being highly motivated;

‘his drive and energy exhausted his co-workers’;

Drivenoun

hitting a golf ball off of a tee with a driver;

‘he sliced his drive out of bounds’;

Drivenoun

the act of driving a herd of animals overland

Drivenoun

a journey in a vehicle driven by someone else;

‘he took the family for a drive in his new car’;

Drivenoun

a physiological state corresponding to a strong need or desire

Drivenoun

(computer science) a device that writes data onto or reads data from a storage medium

Drivenoun

a wide scenic road planted with trees;

‘the riverside drive offers many exciting scenic views’;

Drivenoun

(sports) a hard straight return (as in tennis or squash)

Driveverb

operate or control a vehicle;

‘drive a car or bus’; ‘Can you drive this four-wheel truck?’;

Driveverb

travel or be transported in a vehicle;

‘We drove to the university every morning’; ‘They motored to London for the theater’;

Driveverb

cause someone or something to move by driving;

‘She drove me to school every day’; ‘We drove the car to the garage’;

Driveverb

force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically;

‘She rammed her mind into focus’; ‘He drives me mad’;

Driveverb

to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly;

‘She is driven by her passion’;

Driveverb

cause to move back by force or influence;

‘repel the enemy’; ‘push back the urge to smoke’; ‘beat back the invaders’;

Driveverb

compel somebody to do something, often against his own will or judgment;

‘She finally drove him to change jobs’;

Driveverb

push, propel, or press with force;

‘Drive a nail into the wall’;

Driveverb

cause to move rapidly by striking or throwing with force;

‘drive the ball far out into the field’;

Driveverb

strive and make an effort to reach a goal;

‘She tugged for years to make a decent living’; ‘We have to push a little to make the deadline!’; ‘She is driving away at her doctoral thesis’;

Driveverb

move into a desired direction of discourse;

‘What are you driving at?’;

Driveverb

have certain properties when driven;

‘This car rides smoothly’; ‘My new truck drives well’;

Driveverb

work as a driver;

‘He drives a bread truck’; ‘She drives for the taxi company in Newark’;

Driveverb

move by being propelled by a force;

‘The car drove around the corner’;

Driveverb

urge forward;

‘drive the cows into the barn’;

Driveverb

proceed along in a vehicle;

‘We drive the turnpike to work’;

Driveverb

strike with a driver, as in teeing off;

‘drive a golfball’;

Driveverb

hit very hard and straight with the bat swinging more or less vertically;

‘drive a ball’;

Driveverb

excavate horizontally;

‘drive a tunnel’;

Driveverb

cause to function by supplying the force or power for or by controlling;

‘The amplifier drives the tube’; ‘steam drives the engines’; ‘this device drives the disks for the computer’;

Driveverb

hunting: search for game;

‘drive the forest’;

Driveverb

hunting: chase from cover into more open ground;

‘drive the game’;

Driveverb

operate and control the direction and speed of a motor vehicle

‘they drove back into town’; ‘he got into his car and drove off’;

Driveverb

(of a motor vehicle) travel under the control of a driver

‘a stream of black cars drove by’; ‘a car drives up, and a man gets out’;

Driveverb

own or use (a specified type of car)

‘Sue drives an estate car’;

Driveverb

be licensed or competent to drive a motor vehicle

‘I take it you can drive?’;

Driveverb

convey (someone) in a vehicle, especially a private car

‘his wife drove him to Regent's Park’;

Driveverb

propel or carry along by force in a specified direction

‘the wind will drive you onshore’;

Driveverb

(of wind, rain, or snow) move or fall with great force

‘the snow drove against him’;

Driveverb

(of a source of power) provide the energy to set and keep (an engine or piece of machinery) in motion

‘turbines driven by steam’;

Driveverb

(of a device) power or operate (another device)

‘the interface can be used to drive a printer’;

Driveverb

force (a stake or nail) into place by hitting or pushing it

‘nails are driven through the boards’;

Driveverb

bore (a tunnel)

‘an engineer suggested driving a tunnel through the Judean hills’;

Driveverb

(in ball games) hit or kick (the ball) hard with a free swing of the bat, racket, or foot

‘from the free kick Owen drove the ball past the keeper’;

Driveverb

strike (a ball) from the tee, typically with a driver

‘I'm driving the ball really well and my irons are good’;

Driveverb

urge or force (animals or people) to move in a specified direction

‘the French infantry were driven back’; ‘they drove a flock of sheep through the centre of the city’;

Driveverb

compel to leave

‘he wanted to drive me away’; ‘troops drove out the demonstrators’;

Driveverb

(of a fact or feeling) compel (someone) to act in a particular way, especially one that is considered undesirable or inappropriate

‘he was driven by ambition’; ‘some people are driven to murder their tormentors’;

Driveverb

bring (someone) forcibly into a specified negative state

‘the thought drove him to despair’; ‘my laziness drives my wife crazy’;

Driveverb

force (someone) to work to an excessive extent

‘you're driving yourself too hard’;

Driveverb

cause (something abstract) to happen or develop

‘the consumer has been driving the economy for a number of years’; ‘we need to allow market forces to drive growth in the telecommunications sector’;

Drivenoun

a trip or journey in a car

‘they went for a drive in the country’;

Drivenoun

a street or road

‘Hammond Drive’;

Drivenoun

a short road leading from a public road to a house or other building

‘from the window he could see right down the weedy drive to the front gate’;

Drivenoun

an innate, biologically determined urge to attain a goal or satisfy a need

‘emotional and sexual drives’;

Drivenoun

determination and ambition to achieve something

‘his drive helped Leeds to four Cup finals’;

Drivenoun

an organized effort by a number of people to achieve a purpose

‘a recruitment drive by the police’;

Drivenoun

an organized gathering to play whist or another game, involving many players

‘a whist drive’;

Drivenoun

the transmission of power to machinery or to the wheels of a motor vehicle

‘he experimented with chain drive to run the propeller’;

Drivenoun

(in a car with automatic transmission) the position of the gear selector in which the car will move forward, changing gears automatically as required

‘he threw the car into drive’;

Drivenoun

short for disk drive

‘insert the disk into drive A’;

Drivenoun

(in ball games) a forceful stroke made with a free swing of the bat, racket, or foot against the ball

‘a hard drive to left field’;

Drivenoun

a shot from the tee

‘Greg hit a good drive at the 18th’;

Drivenoun

an act of driving a group of animals to a particular destination

‘cattle were no longer taken on long drives, but were delivered by rail’;

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